Blur It!

I don’t know about you, but when I look at a photograph on my monitor, I sometimes wish I had used a different shutter speed (to freeze or blur action) or a different aperture (for more or less depth of field).

I don’t know about you, but when I look at a photograph on my monitor, I sometimes wish I had used a different shutter speed (to freeze or blur action) or a different aperture (for more or less depth of field). Well, in Photoshop or Photoshop Elements, accomplishing that feat is sometimes possible—to a degree. In this column I’ll show you how... Read more

From Drab To Fab In Five Minutes

Check out the color, contrast and sharpness in this picture of a short-eared owl that I photographed with its prey, a small dove, in the Galápagos.

Original Check out the color, contrast and sharpness in this picture of a short-eared owl that I photographed with its prey, a small dove, in the Galápagos. Notice the exposure and the nice composition. Pretty good, don’t you think? Well, the image didn’t start out that way. Here’s the original shot, which looks kind of drab and flat, mostly... Read more

Photographic Time Shifting

I recently was watching a nature show on television and marveled at some of the nighttime images of jaguars.

I recently was watching a nature show on television and marveled at some of the nighttime images of jaguars. I thought, “Man, I wish I had some nighttime shots of those big cats.” Then I thought, “What the heck.” With Photoshop, I easily can make a daytime shot look like a nighttime one. The opening image for this column is my transformed... Read more

Exposure Rescues

A confession: I’ve made every photo mistake in the book. But, hey, I’ve been at this game for 331?3 years.

FINAL ORIGINAL A confession: I’ve made every photo mistake in the book. But, hey, I’ve been at this game for 331?3 years. If 331?3 doesn’t mean anything to you, then you’re much younger than I am! Here, I’ll show you techniques for fixing two common mistakes: over- and underexposed images. You can use these techniques in Photoshop... Read more

Seeing The Big Picture

Panoramas usually are associated with sweeping landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes.

Panoramas usually are associated with sweeping landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes. However, you can use the pano technique in relatively tight places, too—such as on a narrow street—as I did here for one of my favorite panos from a trip to Cuba. Cool, no? If you’ve never tried a panorama image, here are a few quick tips for creating... Read more

HDR To The Rescue

I guess I could have entitled this column, “Ricky’s Believe It or Not!” but “Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” already has the corner on fascinating and intriguing stories—and has had that corner since I used to read the column of the same name in the Sunday comics in the 1950s at my grandmother’s apartment.

I guess I could have entitled this column, “Ricky’s Believe It or Not!” but “Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” already has the corner on fascinating and intriguing stories—and has had that corner since I used to read the column of the same name in the Sunday comics in the 1950s at my grandmother’s apartment. FINAL I thought about the... Read more

From Flat To Fab

This is a bad news/good news story—one with a happy ending. This past November, I had the opportunity to travel to the bottom of the world to photograph emperor penguins. It was supposed to be the trip of a lifetime. I planned this trip to Antarctica for a year, and couldn’t wait for the day that I’d be on the ice photographing these magnificent animals.

FINAL This is a bad news/good news story—one with a happy ending. This past November, I had the opportunity to travel to the bottom of the world to photograph emperor penguins. It was supposed to be the trip of a lifetime. I planned this trip to Antarctica for a year, and couldn’t wait for the day that I’d be on the ice photographing these... Read more

Quality Of Light

You may not believe it at first, but all the photographs in this issue of PCPhoto have something in common. That something in common is, of course, light.

ORIGINAL You may not believe it at first, but all the photographs in this issue of PCPhoto have something in common. That something in common is, of course, light. Before we take a picture, seeing the light—the contrast range in a scene, the color of light and the direction of light—and then making camera adjustments and/or using accessories... Read more

Thinking Ahead For Better Photos

Ansel Adams, one of the greatest photographers of all time, was big on thinking ahead, or as he put it, envisioning the end result. I’m also big on envisioning the end result, as illustrated by the picture of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco that I used to open this column. It’s one of my favorite images from a recent trip.

Ansel Adams, one of the greatest photographers of all time, was big on thinking ahead, or as he put it, envisioning the end result. I’m also big on envisioning the end result, as illustrated by the picture of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco that I used to open this column. It’s one of my favorite images from a recent trip. Original ... Read more

Rock ‘n’ Roll Photos

Check out my photograph of a young musician who was performing at a local park. My son thinks the photo rocks. He likes the spotlights shining on the subject, the blurred motion of the rocker’s hands and guitar, and the red-hot border that frames the image. He also likes the way I composed the picture, tilting my camera down to one side to create what’s called the disequilibrium effect. What’s more, he likes the way the young rocker is brighter than the background, which makes him stand out prominently in the scene.

Original 1. Check out my photograph of a young musician who was performing at a local park. My son thinks the photo rocks. He likes the spotlights shining on the subject, the blurred motion of the rocker’s hands and guitar, and the red-hot border that frames the image. He also likes the way I composed the picture, tilting my camera down to one... Read more

Add A Creative Touch To Your Pictures

We all strive for pictures that look unique, artistic and creative. That goes for when they’re framed and hung on a wall, when they’re posted on the web, and maybe even when they’re published in a book or magazine article. One creative idea is to add emphasis to the main or central subject in an image. Another is to dress up the image with a digital frame or border. In this column, we’ll cover a few easy techniques for accomplishing both goals—and more.

Original We all strive for pictures that look unique, artistic and creative. That goes for when they’re framed and hung on a wall, when they’re posted on the web, and maybe even when they’re published in a book or magazine article. One creative idea is to add emphasis to the main or central subject in an image. Another is to dress... Read more

Adventures In Aperture

I made this image during my trip to Carnevale in Venice, Italy, this year. Sure, the model is terrific, and the location, an 800-year-old palace, is fantastic. From a technical standpoint, the image is super-sharp, the lighting is flattering and well balanced, the colors are vibrant, and the tight crop draws attention to the subject.

AFTER CROP 1 I made this image during my trip to Carnevale in Venice, Italy, this year. Sure, the model is terrific, and the location, an 800-year-old palace, is fantastic. From a technical standpoint, the image is super-sharp, the lighting is flattering and well balanced, the colors are vibrant, and the tight crop draws... Read more
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