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How to Instantly Make Colors Pop in Photoshop

If you don't like what you see, change the profile
Photo of Photoshop trick

Last week we shared a tutorial on how to make colors pop for portraits through a simple trick in Photoshop and it’s already one of Digital Photo‘s most popular stories of the year. So, we thought we’d share a new video with another Photoshop tip to also help make colors pop.

Where the previous lesson involved five steps of subject separation in Photoshop to produce the 3D color effect, in this case, the software trick should instantly get your colors to pop. Unmesh Dinda, the software guru at PiXimperfect leads the 1.5-minute video below where he explains his “weird color profile trick.”

“Discover how to assign color profiles to instantly make the colors come to life with Photoshop,” Dinda says. “In this video, we will discuss an unconventional, easy, and super-fast technique to enhance colors.”

He admits his simple Photoshop tip seems a bit unusual, but it really works.

“Today I’m going to share with you a weird trick that just feels wrong, but it works brilliantly when it comes to making colors pop,” Dinda says.

First, he explains, make sure the image you are working with has an sRGB color profile, which you can see at the bottom left of the photo. If you can’t see it, click on arrow at the bottom left, and make sure “Document Profile” is selected.

If it’s not already sRGB, you can convert it to sRGB by going to Edit and then Convert to Profile.

“Then, this is the trick,” Dinda notes. “Go to Edit and then Assign Profile. And right in here, choose Profile and choose Adobe RGB. And just as you choose that, have a look at the preview. Here’s the before, here’s the after. Then hit Ok.”

As you’ll notice, once you make that switch to Adobe RGB, the colors in the image should instantly pop off your screen. It’s that simple.

“With Adobe RGB, you can, of course, export it later as sRGB by going to File > Export > Export As,” he adds. “And there’s also an option to convert it to sRGB but that doesn’t change the colors. Isn’t that amazing?”

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