A commercial that doubles as a really interesting video.

Ever since I interviewed adventure photographer Tyler Stableford for a DPP profile a few years ago I’ve been a big fan of his work. Not only does Tyler create great pictures, he’s a downright master of the business and digital sides of photography. He apparently likes Lightroom, as he was tasked with using it recently on assignment for Adobe’s new 3.0 version of the software. The resulting commercial can be found on YouTube, and while it’s a sponsored advertisement, it’s also a really interesting look into how he works in the field as well as the digital workflow of a phenomenal photographer. Check it out.

youtube.com

Ever since I interviewed adventure photographer Tyler Stableford for a DPP profile a few years ago I’ve been a big fan of his work. Not only does Tyler create great pictures, he’s a downright master of the business and digital sides of photography. He apparently likes Lightroom, as he was tasked with using it recently on assignment for Adobe’s... Read more

Funding Photographic History

Tewfic Al-Sawy, The Travel Photographer, recently highlighted the work of an early 20th century photographic visionary by the name of Albert Kahn. Albert wasn’t a photographer, though, he was a banker. He funded a grand photographic project, sending 50 photographers around the world to utilize the new autochrome process to document the peoples of the world. It’s one of the earliest examples of color travel photography in the National Geographic tradition that I’ve ever seen, and both the story and the images are amazing. Read more at Tewfic’s Travel Photographer blog, and then check out more of the work Mr. Kahn brought into being at the web site of his museum and BBC-created book.

thetravelphotographer.blogspot.com

albertkhan.co.uk

Tewfic Al-Sawy, The Travel Photographer, recently highlighted the work of an early 20th century photographic visionary by the name of Albert Kahn. Albert wasn’t a photographer, though, he was a banker. He funded a grand photographic project, sending 50 photographers around the world to utilize the new autochrome process to document the peoples of... Read more

Soccer Photography, Sort Of

I may not be the world’s greatest soccer fan, but I know great photography when I see it. In the spirit of honoring the World Cup fever that’s sweeping the world these days, allow me to direct you to a captivating set of images from photographer Dean Dorat made during 2006’s World Cup. No, they’re not sports photographs. They’re photographs of people engrossed in the sport. It’s a phenomenal look at fandom, and just how important this game is to many, many people.

rachelhulin.com

I may not be the world’s greatest soccer fan, but I know great photography when I see it. In the spirit of honoring the World Cup fever that’s sweeping the world these days, allow me to direct you to a captivating set of images from photographer Dean Dorat made during 2006’s World Cup. No, they’re not sports photographs. They’re photographs... Read more
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New Lightroom 3 is out now.

New Lightroom 3 is out now, and I got it on day 1.

New Lightroom 3 is out now, and I got it on day 1. Actually, I made the switch to Lightroom about six months back when I upgraded to a new desktop machine. The idea of allowing users to beta test prelease versions of software like this must be a brilliant one, because the morning last week when I walked in to my office to find a message from Adobe about... Read more

Astronomy!

I don’t know much about astronomy or even astronomical photography. But I know what I like, and I like the APOD site. I think you will too. It’s the Astronomy Picture Of the Day web site, and every day they upload a great photography from somewhere out there in the surprisingly beautiful universe, along with a description for us laymen written by a professional astronomer. One of my most recent favorites is an image of a silhouetted Space Shuttle Atlantis and the International Space Station transiting the sun. It’s a phenomenal moment of objects we know by heart, yet still shown in a manner we’ve never seen before. I highly recommend adding the APOD site to your daily blogroll. You might even learn a little about astronomy along the way.

apod.nasa.gov

I don’t know much about astronomy or even astronomical photography. But I know what I like, and I like the APOD site. I think you will too. It’s the Astronomy Picture Of the Day web site, and every day they upload a great photography from somewhere out there in the surprisingly beautiful universe, along with a description for us laymen written... Read more

Lynn Goldsmith at work

I’m currently working on a story with photographer Lynn Goldsmith. You may be most familiar with Lynn’s history as a rock ‘n roll photographer, but for the better part of a decade she’s been working on an elaborate self portrait project. You’ll have to wait for the printed page to read my interview with Lynn, but until then you can watch her work. Her partner in photography, camera maker Mamiya, has uploaded a series of behind the scenes videos that show her making portraits of musicians, celebrities and regular people too. It’s interesting and educational to watch her work, and she’s a heck of a nice lady—which comes through when you watch her on video.

youtube.com

I’m currently working on a story with photographer Lynn Goldsmith. You may be most familiar with Lynn’s history as a rock ‘n roll photographer, but for the better part of a decade she’s been working on an elaborate self portrait project. You’ll have to wait for the printed page to read my interview with Lynn, but until then you can watch... Read more

Jim Richardson’s Notes From the Field

I’ve been fortunate throughout my career to spend great portions of my time interviewing and interacting with some of the most talented photographers around. I’m consistently awed and inspired by their work and their stories, and I’m frequently impressed by how nice and down to earth these masters truly are. One photographer still stands as one of my favorite people too, and that’s National Geographic’s Jim Richardson. Not only does Jim manage to consistently create stunning storytelling images, he manages to put a smile on your face too. I even get that sense from looking at his work, which you can do at National Geographic’s web site. Better still, you can get photography tips directly from the master’s mouth in his Notes and Tips From the Field. Inspiring images, phenomenal advice, and just a really great guy. What more could you ask for in a photographer?

photography.nationalgeographic.com

I’ve been fortunate throughout my career to spend great portions of my time interviewing and interacting with some of the most talented photographers around. I’m consistently awed and inspired by their work and their stories, and I’m frequently impressed by how nice and down to earth these masters truly are. One photographer still... Read more

A real photographic use for the iPad

I first considered the practical uses of the Epson P series of digital backup devices a few years ago when I interviewed photographer Frans Lanting. He told me about taking the devices into the field when he shoots in exotic places; they are the perfect surrogate for a laptop where a laptop wouldn’t be practical. Lanting, and many photographers like him, shoot their gigs of data and then download it onto an Epson multimedia viewer to free CF card space and view shots on the built-in LCD screen. When they’re back in the world, they transfer the images from the viewer (the P-7000, for instance, has a 160GB capacity) to the computer and resume their normal workflow. But now there’s a new catch in that method: the iPad.

The iPad is a multimedia viewer of its own sort. An entirely different form factor and, as of now, still not available at the price and capacity of the Epson series of devices, but certainly this is something photographers can consider as a temporary holding tank when working far afield. The interesting thing about the device is the plethora of additional uses for the thing when it’s not being a photographic storage system. The presumed eventual popularity of the thing might make it an ideal interim archive, especially if we’re all carrying them already. But that’s all speculation at this point. After all, as currently priced and spec’d you be much better served by an Epson P-7000 in purely photo storage terms. Still, it’s interesting to see how photographers adapt to new technologies, and how new technologies adapt to photographers. Read up on the idea, including the comments of many photographers dealing directly with the issue, on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider blog.

scottkelby.com

I first considered the practical uses of the Epson P series of digital backup devices a few years ago when I interviewed photographer Frans Lanting. He told me about taking the devices into the field when he shoots in exotic places; they are the perfect surrogate for a laptop where a laptop wouldn’t be practical. Lanting, and many photographers like... Read more

Phase One & Expression Media

In case you didn’t catch it, Phase One (makers of Phase One digital cameras and the increasingly popular Capture One image processing software) has purchased Expression Media (digital asset management and database software used by folks who have a whole lot of images to organize). This is good news for users of both programs, because owners of one can upgrade to the other for free. For a month, Phase One is offering a free copy of Capture One to Expression Media users, and a free copy of Expression Media to Capture One users. I’m anticipating a whole new uber-player in the processing/browsing/management arena. Only time will tell…

phaseone.com

In case you didn’t catch it, Phase One (makers of Phase One digital cameras and the increasingly popular Capture One image processing software) has purchased Expression Media (digital asset management and database software used by folks who have a whole lot of images to organize). This is good news for users of both programs, because owners of one... Read more

The Power of Graphic Simplicity

Over on Tamron’s Angle of View blog, photographer Andre Costantini just published a few great photographs that illustrate one of my favorite photographic concepts: graphic simplicity. Andre had the opportunity to shoot the Golden Gate Bridge from a unique position, and so he utilized his zoom lens across its wide focal range to find the compositions that worked best to showcase the subject—and to do so with the utmost graphic simplicity. It’s no mind-blowing revelation, but sometimes we do forget: less is often more. It’s frequently better to compose with fewer and simpler elements in the frame rather than to try to tell a whole complex story amid a muddled composition. Thanks, Andre, for the simple reminder about simplicity.

tamrontechstips.typepad.com

Photograph by Andre Costantini

Over on Tamron’s Angle of View blog, photographer Andre Costantini just published a few great photographs that illustrate one of my favorite photographic concepts: graphic simplicity. Andre had the opportunity to shoot the Golden Gate Bridge from a unique position, and so he utilized his zoom lens across its wide focal range to find the compositions... Read more