A Great Video About Sibling Photojournalists

Yet another reason to love YouTube. It’s like the library of congress for quirky videos. Do you remember a great news item from 15 years ago? Check YouTube and, sure enough, it probably lives there. The 15-year-old piece in this case is a great interview and exploration of the work of twin brother photographers Peter and David Turnley. These world-class photojournalists can teach all of us a thing or two about documentary photography, and image gathering in general. It’s interesting enough that twin brothers both became prize-winning photographers; even more so when you consider just how competitive they are. The nice thing about the 60 minutes story is that it isn’t just a mere glimpse, but a real in-depth exploration; this piece, called Double Exposure, comes in at nearly 14 minutes long. It’s intense but worthwhile. Thanks to Michael Johnston at The Online Photographer for linking to this interesting video. 

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/02/double-exposure.html

Yet another reason to love YouTube. It’s like the library of congress for quirky videos. Do you remember a great news item from 15 years ago? Check YouTube and, sure enough, it probably lives there. The 15-year-old piece in this case is a great interview and exploration of the work of twin brother photographers Peter and David Turnley. These... Read more

Would You Consider A Class In Cell Phone Photography?

I see you’ve got a pretty nice smartphone there. You must be a really good photographer. No? Oh, I see—you’re just learning. Oh, you’re studying photography? And you say all the material requirements for your college level course are a cell phone and a good attitude? Well that’s great. I never would have believed that you could be a student of photography with only a cell phone, but sure enough you must be enrolled in the cell phone photography course at Immaculata University outside of Philadelphia. What do you do if you need a zoom lens? Oh, that’s a different class. I see. Makes perfect sense to me. Where do I sign up?

hhttp://www.silberstudios.tv/blog/2011/03/college-offers-class-on-cell-phone-photography

I see you’ve got a pretty nice smartphone there. You must be a really good photographer. No? Oh, I see—you’re just learning. Oh, you’re studying photography? And you say all the material requirements for your college level course are a cell phone and a good attitude? Well that’s great. I never would have believed that... Read more

Stanley Kubrick, Photojournalist

I don’t often like to tip my hand when it shows just how little I actually know, but in this case I’ll make an exception. Maybe you’ll also be equally surprised by what I just learned: iconic filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, director of such classics as 2001 and The Shining, was once a working photojournalist. And he was a good one, too. That should be no surprise to any fan of the master’s beautiful cinematography, but it’s neat to look at these great old photographs and search for inklings of what was to come in the future. The wonderful blog How To Be A Retronaut just introduced me to this great collection via a great post full of Kubrick’s late 1940s photography, and the Chicago Tribune has another gallery of classic images from the director’s days as a magazine photographer on assignment for Look.

http://www.howtobearetronaut.com/2011/03/stanley-kubricks-chicago-1949-2
http://www.chicagotribune.com/chi-kubrick-photogallery,0,5085476.photogallery

I don’t often like to tip my hand when it shows just how little I actually know, but in this case I’ll make an exception. Maybe you’ll also be equally surprised by what I just learned: iconic filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, director of such classics as 2001 and The Shining, was once a working photojournalist. And he was a good one, too.... Read more
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Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts

I absolutely love keyboard shortcuts. I’m a Ctrl-A kinda guy; who wants to go to the dropdown menu just to select everything when one quick keystroke does it for you? I’ve got all sorts of speedkeys programmed into my brain that help me navigate through my files and tools quickly and easily. It really does speed up the workflow too, meaning you can spend time on the creative parts of editing and retouching, and not dwell on the menial tasks of opening files, positioning them as you’d like and moving from one to another. I actually have a Ctrl-S compulsion too, and I recommend it to everyone else: each time I pause when working on a file, I automatically hit that key combination to save my work where it is. These tips are all well and good, but did you know that along with pre-programmed shortcut keys you can customize your own unique key combinations to build your own speedkeys in Photoshop? You can even change existing standard presets to work with different key combinations that you prefer. It’s pretty easy, and pretty great, and John Paul Caponigro explains how it works.

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/?p=5388

I absolutely love keyboard shortcuts. I’m a Ctrl-A kinda guy; who wants to go to the dropdown menu just to select everything when one quick keystroke does it for you? I’ve got all sorts of speedkeys programmed into my brain that help me navigate through my files and tools quickly and easily. It really does speed up the workflow too, meaning... Read more

Time Lapse Bridge Installation

Well this is super cool. It’s another great time lapse-video, but this one isn’t just made of sunrises and moody clouds. It’s a sort of preposterous thing: the transportation and installation of the new Willis Avenue Bridge in New York. Photographer Stephen Mallon made more than 30,000 still images and edited them together into this interesting and entertaining video of something not many of us would otherwise get to witness. And we certainly wouldn’t have been able to see it in quite this way. It looks like he went to extensive trouble to set up multiple cameras and multiple vantage points throughout the bridge’s long journey to its new home. Thanks to Rob Galbraith for pointing out this wonderful video.

http://vimeo.com/19020956

Well this is super cool. It’s another great time lapse-video, but this one isn’t just made of sunrises and moody clouds. It’s a sort of preposterous thing: the transportation and installation of the new Willis Avenue Bridge in New York. Photographer Stephen Mallon made more than 30,000 still images and edited them together into this... Read more

The Most Popular Stolen Photo In The World

I never know how to respond to my friends and colleagues who advocate for large-scale music file sharing. I think any justification of "the record companies are getting all the money" and "it only costs $.42 to make a CD" is disingenuous. In most cases, they’re stealing music because it’s easier and cheaper than paying for it. And the same thing goes for photography, which is why I have a personal stake in this argument. I’m not a celebrity musician whose livelihood is endangered due to low sales—and I’m not going to argue about whether file sharing is actually good for the music business. What I am is a photographer who understands how hard it is to earn a living when some people operate under the misconception that if it’s online, it’s free. That couldn’t be further from the truth. Case in point is this story about Noam Galani, a guy who made a really great photograph. The kind of photograph that resonated with a lot of people—a whole lot of people. That’s just the kind of picture we all would love to make, both for the creative achievement and because licensing an awesome photograph is a great way to earn a living as a photographer. Noam can’t do that, though, because his photograph has become ubiquitous on its own. It’s been passed around (from its original home on Flickr) so much that it’s practically worthless. It’s not the sharing of the image that’s so egregious, nor is it the appropriation of the image into a variety of public art projects and movements. The problem is when book publishers and other money-making ventures go about using his photograph to aid in their for-profit ventures. Without paying the creator a dime, it’s simple theft of intellectual property. But that’s too often how business works, these days, and it’s a real shame. Check out the video at Fstoppers to form your own opinion about the costs and benefits of our file sharing world.

http://fstoppers.com/fstoppers-original-the-stolen-scream

I never know how to respond to my friends and colleagues who advocate for large-scale music file sharing. I think any justification of "the record companies are getting all the money" and "it only costs $.42 to make a CD" is disingenuous. In most cases, they’re stealing music because it’s easier and cheaper than paying... Read more

How To Properly Get Permission To Shoot On Location

I don’t like asking for permission. I generally want to do what I want when I want and how I want. This gets me into a fair amount of trouble. It would really get me into trouble if I applied this same philosophy to photographing in public, but I’m smart enough to know that photo shoots tend to attract attention, and if you don’t have permission to shoot in public you’re probably going to get hassled. Even worse, you might be sent packing. That’s bad on any shoot, but especially so if you’re a professional working with a budget and client. Cancelled shoots cost money, and so it’s important to get permission—and the necessary permits—for your location photo and video shoots. You might think that a park is public property, but in fact if you’re setting up a commercial venture, or even a private photo shoot that simply prevents others from enjoying the park, you’re darn right you need permission. Thankfully this post by photographer Chase Jarvis explains how and why to go about getting the necessary permits for your public photo shoots, and he even includes examples of actual paperwork and documents from his own client-driven assignments. The bottom line is this: if you’re shooting for money, you’re practically always going to need permission. And even if you’re shooting just for fun, you sometimes need permission too. Check out the blog to find out how to get it.

http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/03/how-to-permit-photo-video-shoots/

I don’t like asking for permission. I generally want to do what I want when I want and how I want. This gets me into a fair amount of trouble. It would really get me into trouble if I applied this same philosophy to photographing in public, but I’m smart enough to know that photo shoots tend to attract attention, and if you don’t... Read more

The Ramble In Central Park

I’m not a New Yorker, but after seeing this book I kinda wish I was. It’s called The Ramble In Central Park, and it’s a collection of Robert A. McCabe’s photographs of this "Wilderness west of Fifth.” A New Yorker may know about this wilderness, but the rest of us may not be familiar with The Ramble; It truly is a little bit of raw nature right there in the middle of the city. Not just green space like the rest of Central park, it’s actual wild space—a densely forested area almost 40 acres in size and filled with winding paths, streams, lake, boulders and trees. This Ramble is a lovely spot, and these photographs make me wish I had the opportunity to experience the urban wilderness on any afternoon stroll. A beautiful spot in any location, this particular place—and this collection of photographs—is made even more special because of its juxtaposition with New York City. Visit Mr. McCabe’s web site to see more photographs of this wonderful place, and buy the book to serve as a subtle reminder that you shouldn’t let simple geography keep you from photographing what you want. If he can photograph nature in the heart of Manhattan, anything must be possible.

http://www.mccabephotos.com/Ramble.htm

I’m not a New Yorker, but after seeing this book I kinda wish I was. It’s called The Ramble In Central Park, and it’s a collection of Robert A. McCabe’s photographs of this "Wilderness west of Fifth.” A New Yorker may know about this wilderness, but the rest of us may not be familiar with The Ramble; It truly is... Read more

Free Guide To Selling Prints Online

Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn’t your photo editing occur online too? I can’t say that I’ve ever done any serious I just downloaded a free and quite interesting guide to selling prints online courtesy of the fine folks at Photoshelter. Sure, they have an agenda, and that agenda is to convince you that their service is an ideal place to store, display, license, print, and sell your photographs, but that doesn’t mean the info they provide in exchange for an email address is any less pertinent or accurate. It’s a great guide to selling prints online, whether you work with Photoshelter or not. Covering everything from color matching to print finishing, trends in what sells and even pricing and marketing strategies, any photographer who’s ever even thought of selling a print via their web site would be well served to click over to Photoshelter and download this guide. Then go ahead and get rich selling your photographs online, and tell me all about the success that this post inspired.

http://www.photoshelter.com/mkt/how-to-sell-prints

Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn’t your photo editing occur online too? I can’t say that I’ve ever done any serious I just downloaded a free and quite interesting guide to selling prints online courtesy of the fine folks at Photoshelter. Sure, they have an agenda, and that agenda is to convince you that their... Read more

Online Photo Editing Resources

Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn’t your photo editing occur online too? I can’t say that I’ve ever done any serious image editing online, but the idea definitely intrigues me—especially as a resource for folks who don’t have hundreds of dollars to shell out for photo editing programs that live on their computers. The Light Stalking photo blog recently compiled a list of five free online photo editing programs that deserve a look if you’re interested in editing your images online. One of them even carries the Photoshop name. All in all, online editors probably aren’t yet ready to take over for full-fledged computer-based versions of photo software, but they’re making great strides—and they’re providing a useful resource for many users, and maybe even a glimpse into the future of photo software.

http://www.lightstalking.com/online-photo-editing

Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn’t your photo editing occur online too? I can’t say that I’ve ever done any serious image editing online, but the idea definitely intrigues me—especially as a resource for folks who don’t have hundreds of dollars to shell out for photo editing programs that live on... Read more