Use A Welding Glass As A 10-Stop ND Filter

I love the DIY ethos. You know, take whatever materials you may have at hand and repurpose them to improve your photography. This do-it-yourself project doesn’t even require much construction know-how on your part. You just need to buy a piece intended for one thing (welding) and use it to replace a piece intended for another thing (a neutral density filter). In the process, you’ll save yourself $50, $100 or even $200. It’s simple: purchase a piece of welder’s glass—a very dark, dense chunk of glass used to shield welders’ eyes while they work—and slap it on your lens as an ND filter. There are two problems with this approach, of course, because there are always tradeoffs with a hack like this. First, the welder’s glass doesn’t have the convenience of an actual filter (as in, there’s no threads to attach the filter to your lens so you’ll have to improvise with tape or rubber bands) and two, the welder’s glass is bound to have a color tint so it’s not truly neutral. But with a custom white balance and a bit of ingenuity to affix the filter to your lens, you can achieve massive amounts of density in a simple little hack. It’s a great way to shoot really long exposures in bright sunlight, which can allow you to make pictures that would otherwise be impossible. Read all about this great project at the DIY Photography blog, then do it for yourself.

http://www.diyphotography.net/use-welding-glass-as-10-stops-nd-filter

I love the DIY ethos. You know, take whatever materials you may have at hand and repurpose them to improve your photography. This do-it-yourself project doesn’t even require much construction know-how on your part. You just need to buy a piece intended for one thing (welding) and use it to replace a piece intended for another thing (a neutral... Read more

A new Tronix Explorer Battery To Power Your Life

Rob Galbraith recently delivered news of a new product I’m especially excited about. It’s the Tronix Explorer Mini battery pack. Technically it’s a pure sine wave inverter, but I’m no electrical engineer and I don’t exactly know what that means. What I do know is that it acts like a big old battery to power my strobes or my laptop or just about anything that requires a regular household AC connection. I have a bigger Tronix Explorer pack, the XT, which, after several years of powering my strobes on location shoots is nearing the end of its useful life, so I’m ready to upgrade. Why wouldn’t I consider a more compact power source like the new Mini? At about the size of a first generation cell phone, bag and all, this $350 product ships direct from Innovatronix in the Phillippines. Check the Innovatronix web site for pertinent info, and to order the new Mini.

http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/content_page.asp?cid=7-11532-11617

Rob Galbraith recently delivered news of a new product I’m especially excited about. It’s the Tronix Explorer Mini battery pack. Technically it’s a pure sine wave inverter, but I’m no electrical engineer and I don’t exactly know what that means. What I do know is that it acts like a big old battery to power my strobes... Read more

Buy Bob O'Connor Prints

I’ve been a fan of the photography of Bob O’Connor since I first interviewed him a few years ago. He’s got a sublime style, and he makes beautiful, elegant, simple photographs of the most banal subjects. That banality is crucial to the success of his work, I think, because he makes beautiful images of these objects most of us would simply look right past. Now you can own a print of one of Bob’s beautiful Iceland images courtesy of the great site 20×200. The premise of the web site is simple: great art that regular people can afford. An edition of 200 8×10 prints of Bob’s image are available for $20 each. That’s what I call affordable art. (For those with deeper pockets, limited editions of larger sizes—such as two 30×40-inch prints for $2000—are also available.) Bob’s a great photographer, this is a great image, and it’s brought to you courtesy of a great web site. Hurry, while supplies last!

http://www.20×200.com/art/2011/05/breidalsvik-iceland.html

I’ve been a fan of the photography of Bob O’Connor since I first interviewed him a few years ago. He’s got a sublime style, and he makes beautiful, elegant, simple photographs of the most banal subjects. That banality is crucial to the success of his work, I think, because he makes beautiful images of these objects most of us would... Read more
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William Eggleston Visits The Today show

William Eggleston is a master photographer, an icon of modern photographic art in the 20th century. And he’s still going strong here in the 21st. The Today show recently aired an interview with the 71-year-old photographer, which offers an interesting glimpse into this genius’ life and working method. Soft spoken and shy, Eggleston’s work revolutionized photography—he took color photography from the realm of snapshots into the fine art world. This nearly five-minute long interview showcases some of his most famous photographs, as well as a glimpse into the approach of this iconic photographer.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/18424824#43223662

William Eggleston is a master photographer, an icon of modern photographic art in the 20th century. And he’s still going strong here in the 21st. The Today show recently aired an interview with the 71-year-old photographer, which offers an interesting glimpse into this genius’ life and working method. Soft spoken and shy, Eggleston’s... Read more

Joplin Photographer Raises Funds For Models

Beauty photographer Brian DeMint is the subject of an upcoming profile in the pages of Digital Photo Pro magazine. He’s also based in Joplin, Missouri, which was devastated by a tornado on May 22nd. Brian and his family were unharmed, but two of his models were not so lucky. Rose Dominguez and Jeniffer Roberts were lucky to survive the tornado. Jeniffer’s family home was destroyed, along with all of its contents. Brian has been able to provide some immediate relief with donated clothes and toiletries, but the family is still desperately in need of much more. Rose was injured during the tornado when her car was thrown end over end. Along with minor injuries, she fractured vertebrae in her lower back. Now she is unable to work for at least six weeks, and with no medical insurance the bills are piling up. To help raise funds on behalf of these models, Brian has created a ChipIn page to collect donations. "No amount is too small," Brian writes, "and every penny is sincerely appreciated. We love our girls and want to help them through these most difficult of times." To contribute, please visit Brian’s ChipIn page at http://eyeworksmodels.chipin.com/mypages/view/id/08e134fa9a3a6e85

Beauty photographer Brian DeMint is the subject of an upcoming profile in the pages of Digital Photo Pro magazine. He’s also based in Joplin, Missouri, which was devastated by a tornado on May 22nd. Brian and his family were unharmed, but two of his models were not so lucky. Rose Dominguez and Jeniffer Roberts were lucky to survive the tornado.... Read more

More Amazing Iceberg Photography

Macro photography requires specialized equipment. Beyond the basics of a macro lens, lighting needs to be addressed as well. Why not just use the sun? Well, sometimes you can, but sometimes when you’re up close and personal with a tiny little subject, the camera, lens and your own head combine to make a deep dark shadow that you need to light you way out of. Most folks invest in a ring light for this purpose—a flash that wraps around the front of the lens to provide even illumination for tiny subjects. Some folks don’t want to invest in a ringlight, so they invest in a substitute that turns their standard hot-shoe flash into a pseudo-ringlight—like the Orbis ring. If you’re neither of these types of people, whether you’re a total cheapskate or you get inspired by doing everything yourself from repurposed materials, this is the ideal DIY project for you. First, purchase a can of Pringles potato chips. Then eat all of the contents in one sitting. Then turn the empty can into a hacked together yet surprisingly effective lighting setup for macro photography. Read all about this creation by photographer Steve Kushnir at the DIY Photography blog, then get busy eating and crafting—and making better macro pictures.

http://www.diyphotography.net/super-easy-macro-lighting-using-a-pringles-can

Macro photography requires specialized equipment. Beyond the basics of a macro lens, lighting needs to be addressed as well. Why not just use the sun? Well, sometimes you can, but sometimes when you’re up close and personal with a tiny little subject, the camera, lens and your own head combine to make a deep dark shadow that you need to light... Read more

Eat Your Way To Great Macro Lighting

Macro photography requires specialized equipment. Beyond the basics of a macro lens, lighting needs to be addressed as well. Why not just use the sun? Well, sometimes you can, but sometimes when you’re up close and personal with a tiny little subject, the camera, lens and your own head combine to make a deep dark shadow that you need to light you way out of. Most folks invest in a ring light for this purpose—a flash that wraps around the front of the lens to provide even illumination for tiny subjects. Some folks don’t want to invest in a ringlight, so they invest in a substitute that turns their standard hot-shoe flash into a pseudo-ringlight—like the Orbis ring. If you’re neither of these types of people, whether you’re a total cheapskate or you get inspired by doing everything yourself from repurposed materials, this is the ideal DIY project for you. First, purchase a can of Pringles potato chips. Then eat all of the contents in one sitting. Then turn the empty can into a hacked together yet surprisingly effective lighting setup for macro photography. Read all about this creation by photographer Steve Kushnir at the DIY Photography blog, then get busy eating and crafting—and making better macro pictures.

http://www.diyphotography.net/super-easy-macro-lighting-using-a-pringles-can

Macro photography requires specialized equipment. Beyond the basics of a macro lens, lighting needs to be addressed as well. Why not just use the sun? Well, sometimes you can, but sometimes when you’re up close and personal with a tiny little subject, the camera, lens and your own head combine to make a deep dark shadow that you need to light... Read more

Fight For Your Photographer’s Rights

Last week I wrote that we photographers shouldn’t be hypocrites. Well now’s my chance to remind two die-hard readers, Lady Gaga and Janet Jackson, that they in particular should not be hypocrites either. As creative artists themselves, I had hoped that they would respect the rights of creators. But apparently not. So Ms. Gaga and Ms. Jackson, please don’t make photographers sign contracts that transfer the copyrights on the images we create of your concerts directly to you. I understand your need, or perceived need, or plain old desire, to maintain some control over your image and your brand, but come on—these contracts are offensive. "Egregious" was the term used by John Harrington on his Photo Business News & Forum blog. Read all about the hubbub, and what you should be prepared to do about a bad contract when you see one, at Mr. Harrington’s wonderful web site—which is a must-read for anyone interested in the business side of the photo business. Then head over to the ASMP web site where they’ve got a whole section about bad contracts, how to spot them, and what to do about them.

http://asmp.org/tutorials/bad-contract.html
http://photobusinessforum.blogspot.com/2011/03/egregious-demands-by-gaga-and-ms.html

Last week I wrote that we photographers shouldn’t be hypocrites. Well now’s my chance to remind two die-hard readers, Lady Gaga and Janet Jackson, that they in particular should not be hypocrites either. As creative artists themselves, I had hoped that they would respect the rights of creators. But apparently not. So Ms. Gaga and Ms. Jackson,... Read more

More Megapixel Madness

Some say the race to make super-high-resolution cameras is dead. The new frontier is better image quality, they say, not massively high-resolution image files. Well to them I have but one thing to say: meet the new 200-megapixel Hasselblad H4D-200MS. For product and still-life photographers, this camera offers the ultimate resolution available in digital capture. To be clear, the camera achieves that whopping 200-megapixel resolution not through a sensor with 200-million physical pixels on it, but through utilizing multi-shot technology. Six different exposures are made on the 50-megapixel sensor, which physically shifts a distance of 1.5 pixels after each exposure in order to create an overlapping dense pixel map—no gaps in coverage and a whole lot of pixel information combine to create this amazing, super-detailed 200-megapixel image. The camera’s not inexpensive, but there is a bit of good news: owners of the H4D-50 can send their cameras in to the manufacturer for a 200-megapixel retrofit. Read all about it at the Hasselblad web site.

http://www.hasselblad.com/products/h-system/h4d-200ms.aspx

Some say the race to make super-high-resolution cameras is dead. The new frontier is better image quality, they say, not massively high-resolution image files. Well to them I have but one thing to say: meet the new 200-megapixel Hasselblad H4D-200MS. For product and still-life photographers, this camera offers the ultimate resolution available in digital... Read more

Photograph Bears In Alaska With World-Class Wildlife Photographers

What are you doing this July? Can you spare a few days to travel to Alaska to learn from, and shoot with, world-class wildlife photographers Jay Goodrich and Art Wolfe? Because if you can, you most definitely should. The pair will be hosting a four-day workshop where you’ll photograph not only brown bears but bald eagles and puffins and countless other wild animals, as well as the beautiful landscapes of Lake Clark National Park. There are still a few open spots, but only a few. So act fast. Read all about the trip, including how and where to sign up, at Jay’s blog.

http://jaygoodrich-blog.com/lake-clark-alaska-art-wolfe-and-jay-goodrich-july-25-28-2011

What are you doing this July? Can you spare a few days to travel to Alaska to learn from, and shoot with, world-class wildlife photographers Jay Goodrich and Art Wolfe? Because if you can, you most definitely should. The pair will be hosting a four-day workshop where you’ll photograph not only brown bears but bald eagles and puffins and countless... Read more