Sacred Headwaters

Amazing outdoor photographer Carr Clifton is releasing a beautiful new book called Sacred Headwaters, which serves as a visual accompaniment to National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis as he fights to save the Sacred Headwaters of three wild rivers in British Columbia. Filled with beautiful images from land and air, this collection is a must have for fans of Clifton’s work, for those who appreciate this endangered area, and for anyone with an interest in the natural world and efforts—by artists and others—to protect it. Read more about the book and the project at Clifton’s web site, then click over to Greystone Books to order a copy for yourself. 

http://news.carrclifton.com/2011/06/21/sacred-headwaters-book-fall-2011-release
http://www.dmpibooks.com/book/sacred-headwaters

Amazing outdoor photographer Carr Clifton is releasing a beautiful new book called Sacred Headwaters, which serves as a visual accompaniment to National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis as he fights to save the Sacred Headwaters of three wild rivers in British Columbia. Filled with beautiful images from land and air, this collection is... Read more

Own Your Own McCurry

I’ve been fortunate in my career to interview some of the greatest photographers around. None of them have been greater, or more influential, or have had such an impact on me personally, than Magnum photographer Steve McCurry. Perhaps best known for his iconic "Afghan Girl" National Geographic cover, McCurry has a tremendous portfolio of images—many of them portraits—from three decades traveling the world. He’s a true photographic icon, and if like me you are a huge admirer of his work you may want to look into the new Iconic Photographs limited edition book from publisher Phaidon. Complete with a limited edition photographic print, the book is signed and numbered (up to 3,300) by Mr. McCurry himself. At just under $400 it’s an option for collecting his work that is within reach of those who aren’t the typical millionaire art collector. And a great way to own a collection of fabulous documentary and portrait photographs from one of the world’s best photographers.

http://www.phaidon.com/store/photography/steve-mcurry-the-iconic-photographs-limited-edition-9780714856339

I’ve been fortunate in my career to interview some of the greatest photographers around. None of them have been greater, or more influential, or have had such an impact on me personally, than Magnum photographer Steve McCurry. Perhaps best known for his iconic "Afghan Girl" National Geographic cover, McCurry has a tremendous portfolio... Read more

Moby Photos: Destroyed

This week is all about photo books. We’ll start with one by Moby. You know, Moby, that quiet little bald guy with glasses who makes that loud fun dance music stuff? He’s actually a pretty talented artist in a variety of arenas. He supports artists too, allowing independent filmmakers like you and me to use his music free of charge—which I have done. Well his talents also extend to photography as well, and he’s got a new book and London exhibit that coincided with last month’s release of a brand new album, Destroyed. Apparently Mr. Moby takes his camera wherever he goes, and this book documents his travels around the world as a touring musician. Check out the work via the Hotshoe blog, and consider supporting this artist who supports the work of so many others by buying his new book, or maybe the record by the same name—which of course features a Moby photograph on the cover as well.

http://hotshoeblog.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/moby-destroyed-photo-book-photo-show-and-album-release-in-london

This week is all about photo books. We’ll start with one by Moby. You know, Moby, that quiet little bald guy with glasses who makes that loud fun dance music stuff? He’s actually a pretty talented artist in a variety of arenas. He supports artists too, allowing independent filmmakers like you and me to use his music free of charge—which... Read more
Advertisement

Old Egypt In Color

Regular readers know of my fetish for antique images of exotic locales that have been photographed in color well ahead of the time when color images were commonplace. Well here’s a pair of great galleries I’ve added to my must-see list. First is a group of photographs of Egypt from the early 1900s at the Brain Pickings blog. They’re lantern slides—like glass transparencies—that were used in "magic lantern" viewers. Images from Egypt generally spark our western interests on their own, so this gallery of 100-year-old color photos is nothing short of mesmerizing. The second gallery is filled with images from a locale that isn’t quite so exotic: the good ol’ US of A. But the images are from the wild west in the 1920s and 30s, so they aren’t your everyday fare. And as color photos, they’re remarkably rare. Fascinating for photographers and historians alike, whether you just appreciate the oddity of seeing old worlds in color, or whether you just appreciate a glimpse into the past that isn’t quite as abstract as black & white.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/05/23/egypt-vintage-lantern-slides
http://www.howtobearetronaut.com/2011/05/america-1920s-30s-in-color

Regular readers know of my fetish for antique images of exotic locales that have been photographed in color well ahead of the time when color images were commonplace. Well here’s a pair of great galleries I’ve added to my must-see list. First is a group of photographs of Egypt from the early 1900s at the Brain Pickings blog. They’re... Read more

Simple Color Management

Leave it to John Paul Caponigro to craft a really great blog post that simplifies a complex digital imaging issue. This topic is color management—something I know all about, as I have fought with it since I first put my pictures on a computer in the 1990s. (Actually, that’s not quite true. I messed around for a decade before I started to learn the importance of color management.) Anyway, Mr. Caponigro’s post is a simple one: Six things you can do to ensure you’ve got good color management. Calibrate your monitor, make sure Photoshop’s settings are working for you, and generally do these simple things that will help preserve good quality color control throughout your digital workflow. And do it now. No need to wait for a decade to go by before you learn the importance of color management too.

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/5923/6-simple-steps-to-good-color-management-2

Leave it to John Paul Caponigro to craft a really great blog post that simplifies a complex digital imaging issue. This topic is color management—something I know all about, as I have fought with it since I first put my pictures on a computer in the 1990s. (Actually, that’s not quite true. I messed around for a decade before I started to learn... Read more

Cover Your Eyepiece

This could be the reason your photos are coming out dark: light is entering the camera from the back. Precisely, it’s entering through the viewfinder and messing with the camera’s ability to accurately read TTL light levels. Ever notice that little viewfinder cover that’s probably attached to your camera strap? I didn’t think so. Well Peter West Carey at Digital Photography School did notice it, and he’s put it to good use to help prevent erroneous light from affecting his photos. You don’t have to use this little device to eliminate light from the viewfinder, you can also use your hand, or your eye, or just about anything else to block light from leaking in while the camera is calculating exposures. Read all about how and why this works at Peter’s great DPS blog post.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/cover-your-eyepiece

This could be the reason your photos are coming out dark: light is entering the camera from the back. Precisely, it’s entering through the viewfinder and messing with the camera’s ability to accurately read TTL light levels. Ever notice that little viewfinder cover that’s probably attached to your camera strap? I didn’t think... Read more

How To Be A CSI Photographer

Here’s an interesting "how-to" story for you: How to be a real life CSI photographer. That’s right, crime scene photography. Maybe it’s not something to which the average photo enthusiast is aspiring, but it’s an interesting story nonetheless. When you stop and consider all of the professions in which photography is essential, you realize there’s a whole world beyond those of us who shoot for fun. The Pixiq blog’s Haje Jan Kamps recently published an interesting interview with a photographer whose day job, and sometimes night job, is being a real life crime scene photographer. It’s an interesting glimpse into the workings of a photographer who is likely to be having not nearly as much fun with his camera as the rest of us.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/csi

Here’s an interesting "how-to" story for you: How to be a real life CSI photographer. That’s right, crime scene photography. Maybe it’s not something to which the average photo enthusiast is aspiring, but it’s an interesting story nonetheless. When you stop and consider all of the professions in which photography... Read more

The Next RAW?

When I first heard about RAW digital capture, the claims seemed astronomical. You could shoot pictures and then adjust the exposure after the picture was made? That seemed preposterous. And now it seems like an integral part of my daily workflow. Well hopefully the same will hold true for this fancy new technology from a company called Lytro. It allows photographers to take pictures now and then focus later. That’s right, shoot first, then focus after the picture is made. According to this New York Times story the technology is legit, and involves using microlenses to capture images at multiple angles and, presumably, multiple focal points. The potential impact is, quite obviously, huge. What if one day in the future you can adjust, along with exposure and white balance, focus after capture? The company has plans for a consumer-level point-and-shoot, which they’re working to get into production right now. One benefit that hadn’t occurred to me but which seems really great? Because the camera doesn’t need to autofocus there’s no shutter lag, so you miss fewer moments. That alone is huge. I can’t wait to see how—if and when—this pans out.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/22/technology/22camera.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1

When I first heard about RAW digital capture, the claims seemed astronomical. You could shoot pictures and then adjust the exposure after the picture was made? That seemed preposterous. And now it seems like an integral part of my daily workflow. Well hopefully the same will hold true for this fancy new technology from a company called Lytro. It allows... Read more

Paul Nicklen’s Narwhals

This post comes courtesy of a link from the Kateoplis Tumblr page—which is a Tumblr I highly recommend if you’re interested in gathering links to great photos and interesting tidbits from the art, fashion and photographic communities. She recently linked to a National Geographic story about Narwhal hunting in Arctic ice floes by Paul Nicklen. Nicklen is an amazing photographer, and this series—which is definitely a bit disturbing due to fairly graphic images of the animals hunted and butchered—is enlightening and moving. A must read for fans of the work of Mr. Nicklen, and for those who are simply concerned about the plight of the arctic and its inhabitants, both man and animal.
http://kateoplis.tumblr.com/post/6514054236/paul-nicklen
Photograph by Paul Nicklen

This post comes courtesy of a link from the Kateoplis Tumblr page—which is a Tumblr I highly recommend if you’re interested in gathering links to great photos and interesting tidbits from the art, fashion and photographic communities. She recently linked to a National Geographic story about Narwhal hunting in Arctic ice floes by Paul Nicklen.... Read more

A Wealth Of Photo Resources, All On Video

John Paul Caponigro recently filled his normally very interesting blog with a whole bunch of videos about another photographer. That photographer is Ansel Adams, and the YouTube clips are definitely worth watching. But what really blew me away about this post was what it led me to: a couple of great video discoveries, caches of photography videos collected online. First is the super-secret (or so it would appear) stash of videos hidden away on John Paul Caponigro’s site. A simple text page that looks like it might be a mistake turns out to contain links to videos from forty-some world-class photographers. The second great group of videos actually comes from the YouTube page where Mr. Caponigro found all those great Ansel Adams videos. It’s Tom Johnston’s ZoneIII YouTube channel, and it’s packed with dozens of photo-related videos—interviews with photographers, videos of their workflows and how-to videos made by Mr. Johnston himself illustrating photographic and darkroom techniques. Between these two caches of videos you can pretty much learn whatever you want about photography from whomever you’d like, and you won’t run out of videos to watch any time soon.

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/5713/ansel-adams-video/
http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/downloads/creativity/creativity-photographers.php
http://www.youtube.com/user/ZoneIII

John Paul Caponigro recently filled his normally very interesting blog with a whole bunch of videos about another photographer. That photographer is Ansel Adams, and the YouTube clips are definitely worth watching. But what really blew me away about this post was what it led me to: a couple of great video discoveries, caches of photography videos... Read more
Menu