Gregory Heisler Explains How He Lit Another Iconic Cover

I’m more and more convinced that you could skip photography school altogether and just watch this ongoing series of videos of Gregory Heisler dissecting his photographs. Created by Profoto, the videos have Heisler explaining the creation of some of his most famous cover shots—none of which are more famous than the most recent video’s subject, the 2001 Time cover with Rudy Giuliani. A phenomenal and iconic photograph, to be sure. What’s most exciting about this shot, in terms of the lighting at least, is what Strobist David Hobby points out in his brief writeup: the lighting was environmentally centered. Heisler gelled his lights green and orange to match the warmth of the ambient city lights, and all of them were positioned below (except for the fill) to match the lighting that would be provided by the city below. A genius photograph, wonderfully executed and beautifully explained.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2010/09/gregory-heisler-whiteboards-guiliani.html

I’m more and more convinced that you could skip photography school altogether and just watch this ongoing series of videos of Gregory Heisler dissecting his photographs. Created by Profoto, the videos have Heisler explaining the creation of some of his most famous cover shots—none of which are more famous than the most recent video’s subject,... Read more

Primes vs. Zooms

I’ve often liked using prime lenses. In fact, all things being equal, I tend to prefer them to zooms. I’ve always felt like working within the box of a fixed focal length forces you to be a more active seer. I could never quite put my finger on it, but I figured it had something to do with the idea that when working with a zoom lens, if something doesn’t fit just right you adjust the focal length and make an easy fix. But with a prime lens, you move in and out, side to side, up and down… you’re engaged with your subject, working to see, conscious of making the perfect composition.

Then I read an offhand comment by Michael Johnston of The Online Photographer blog. In a post about what makes Leica rangefinders so great (which you can read at http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2010/09/the-secrets-of-the-leica.html) he listed the cameras’ prime lenses as a major benefit. He wrote, "You learn how to see like the lens sees." Aha! That’s it! The difference between prime lenses and zoom lenses is that simple, and that profound. A prime lens forces you to see as the lens sees, while a zoom lens can be forced to see the way you see. It may be simple, but it means a lot. At least, it does to us prime lens shooters. 

If you don’t shoot with primes, I recommend trying one out. They’re often really sharp, and really fast, and they can be pretty affordable too. The normal 50mm prime used to be industry standard in a new camera kit, but it’s been replaced by the mid-range zoom in recent years. If you’ve got an old dis-used prime of any size, strap it on and go for a walk. Or consider purchasing a new prime; the lenses are popular enough that Nikon has just introduced another great professional prime—the 85mm f/1.4. Whatever prime you choose, enjoy giving up a bit of control to the camera, and see how the lens sees. You might like it. You may even find it freeing. 

I’ve often liked using prime lenses. In fact, all things being equal, I tend to prefer them to zooms. I’ve always felt like working within the box of a fixed focal length forces you to be a more active seer. I could never quite put my finger on it, but I figured it had something to do with the idea that when working with a zoom lens, if... Read more

Big Old Polaroids

Forbes magazine just did a great little writeup on the massive 20×24-inch Polaroid Land camera. Only seven were made, with four of them remaining in useful existence. If you’ve got the budget—close to $2000 a day and $200 per exposure—you can rent the camera for your next shoot. If you’re looking to differentiate your work in this increasingly all-digital world, I’d say you can’t do much better than a mammoth 20×24-inch Polaroid original. See what some renowned photographers have done with the camera online. Jennifer Trausch, mentioned in the Forbes story, takes the 20×24 on location to shoot in the real world—not something often seen with the cumbersome machines. William Wegman popularized the format with his series of portraits of his dogs, and Elsa Dorfman is perhaps the photographer most closely associated with the format as she has one in her own studio. Each of these photographers is worth investigating, and if you have the good fortune to see original 20×24 Polaroids in a gallery or museum near you, be sure to search them out. They’re unlike any other photographic format you’re likely to have seen before, nor ever will again.

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2010/0913/life-art-photography-cameras-polaroid-land-grab.html
http://www.jennifertrausch.com
http://www.wegmanworld.com/gallery/works.html
http://elsadorfman.com/camera.html

Forbes magazine just did a great little writeup on the massive 20×24-inch Polaroid Land camera. Only seven were made, with four of them remaining in useful existence. If you’ve got the budget—close to $2000 a day and $200 per exposure—you can rent the camera for your next shoot. If you’re looking to differentiate your work in this increasingly... Read more
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Pix Boom Ba

Well this is a fun idea. Ever want to ask a studly National Geographic photographer for some picture-taking advice? Now you can, thanks to the new web site Pix Boom Ba. The ridiculously named URL should give you an idea of some of the charm of this photo tips site, and that’s the fact that the guru photographers involved—Bob Caputo and Cary Wolinski—are having fun while answering questions and offering photographic advice. With so many online resources geared to teaching photographic basics via blog, text and video (as this site also does), it’s great to see someone putting effort into making photo tips entertaining too. And that’s something this site does better than almost any other. 

http://www.pixboomba.com

Well this is a fun idea. Ever want to ask a studly National Geographic photographer for some picture-taking advice? Now you can, thanks to the new web site Pix Boom Ba. The ridiculously named URL should give you an idea of some of the charm of this photo tips site, and that’s the fact that the guru photographers involved—Bob Caputo and Cary... Read more

Light Painting with Harold Ross

While recently surfing the Photography Served photo blog, I stumbled upon some excellent work quite unlike anything I’d ever seen before. That’s increasingly rare these days, so it came as a very pleasant surprise to discover that the amazing light painting photography by photographer Harold Ross was not a fluke; his whole portfolio is full of amazing work like this. So I got in touch with Harold, a well established commercial shooter from Philadelphia, to find out how he goes about making such great light painting photographs. 

While recently surfing the Photography Served photo blog, I stumbled upon some excellent work quite unlike anything I’d ever seen before. That’s increasingly rare these days, so it came as a very pleasant surprise to discover that the amazing light painting photography by photographer Harold Ross was not a fluke; his whole portfolio is... Read more

Make The Ordinary Extraordinary

I like simple and I like great. The work of photographer Caleb Charland would have to qualify as both. Charland got a recent writeup on the DIY Photography blog, which is where I stumbled across the man and his work. What is perhaps most "DIY" (do-it-yourself, for those uninitiated) about Charland’s work is the fact that he’s building interesting constructs and contraptions to photograph. The photography is fairly straightforward, albeit beautiful, but the subjects themselves make the work totally fascinating. I particularly like the idea of illustrating everyday concepts—like magnetism, for instance—in such a simple way. Simple, yes, but plain? Definitely not. I love photographs like this that take something ordinary and make it look extraordinary. Check out the writeup at DIYPhotography.net, then head over to Charland’s web site to see more of his work. His new series of color images is mind blowing. 

http://www.diyphotography.net/interview-with-caleb-charland
http://www.calebcharland.com

I like simple and I like great. The work of photographer Caleb Charland would have to qualify as both. Charland got a recent writeup on the DIY Photography blog, which is where I stumbled across the man and his work. What is perhaps most "DIY" (do-it-yourself, for those uninitiated) about Charland’s work is the fact that he’s... Read more

Buy Nikons, direct from Nikon

Well duh. Why didn’t I, or they, or any camera manufacturer for that matter, think of this sooner? I’m sure it’s got to do with all sorts of things I can’t comprehend regarding distributors and middlemen and contracts and such—after all, if you’ve sold Nikon cameras for 50 years you’re likely not happy with the company trying to cut you out. But what’s bad, or potentially bad, for retailers could be good, at least potentially, for us customers. Now you can buy Nikon gear, including refurbished and discounted items, direct from the manufacturer. I don’t think bricks and mortar retailers have too much to worry about because buying a camera is like buying a car—you’ve got to test drive the thing first. Holding a camera in your hands is still an ideal way to see what a camera is all about before you plunk down the money to purchase it. Still, if you know what you want, buying straight from the manufacturer does seem convenient. We’ll see how this all shakes out fairly soon, I’m sure.

http://shop.nikonusa.com/store/nikonusa/en_US/home

Well duh. Why didn’t I, or they, or any camera manufacturer for that matter, think of this sooner? I’m sure it’s got to do with all sorts of things I can’t comprehend regarding distributors and middlemen and contracts and such—after all, if you’ve sold Nikon cameras for 50 years you’re likely not happy with the... Read more

Happy Labor Day!

Today is Labor Day, so hopefully that means you’re not reading this at the office computer but on the couch—or even better, on the patio warming up the grill for a backyard barbecue or getting ready to take an end-of-summer dip in the pool. Either way, enjoy your day.

Today is Labor Day, so hopefully that means you’re not reading this at the office computer but on the couch—or even better, on the patio warming up the grill for a backyard barbecue or getting ready to take an end-of-summer dip in the pool. Either way, enjoy your day. If you’re looking for something online before you get out there and enjoy the... Read more

Bits of Bits

Steve Berardi is the PhotoNaturalist, and I highly recommend reading his blog if you’re at all interested in wildlife, landscape and nature photography. But his expertise goes well beyond topics of use only to outdoorsmen, as evidenced by a techie think piece he recently wrote for DPS. It answers a question about which I’ve always wondered: what exactly is a bit and why does it matter? Analog-to-digital converters, color depth, even Photoshop itself uses the ìbitî terminology, but none of them seem to mean exactly the same thing. So if you too wonder about bits, check out Steve’s great new post. And then be sure to visit his own blog to see what wildlife and nature photography bits you can learn about too. (See what I did there?) Pardon the pun, but it is true: there’s always lots to learn from the PhotoNaturalist.

http://digital-photography-school.com/16-bit-vs-32-bit-vs-64-bit-what-does-it-all-mean
http://photonaturalist.net

Steve Berardi is the PhotoNaturalist, and I highly recommend reading his blog if you’re at all interested in wildlife, landscape and nature photography. But his expertise goes well beyond topics of use only to outdoorsmen, as evidenced by a techie think piece he recently wrote for DPS. It answers a question about which I’ve always wondered:... Read more

All About Color

Everything, and I do mean everything, you could ever want to know about color seems to be contained within this nice new post at Lifehacker. Not only is it an amusing and entertaining read, it really does have a lot of pertinent information for photographers who want a deeper understanding of how and why color works in a photograph. More than a technical analysis, though, the post is about color theory—the interactions of complementary colors and the psychological impact of certain hues, for instance—and how to put it to use in your photographs.

http://lifehacker.com/5620138/how-to-get-the-best-color-out-of-your-photos

Everything, and I do mean everything, you could ever want to know about color seems to be contained within this nice new post at Lifehacker. Not only is it an amusing and entertaining read, it really does have a lot of pertinent information for photographers who want a deeper understanding of how and why color works in a photograph. More than a technical... Read more

Street Photo Tips

DPS always has great photography tips covering a wide variety of topics. Sometimes they get a little bit specific, but sometimes that’s what makes them all the more interesting. Such is the case with a recent post offering tips for aspiring street photographers. Even if you’re not interested in street photography in particular, these are great storytelling tips that apply to a number of shooting styles and subjects. I knew it would be a worthwhile read the moment I saw the first tip: ditch your zoom lens in favor of a wide angle lens. Yes! This advice seems counterintuitive to many, but in fact the wide angle prime is the perfect context-setting lens. Rather than offering an infinite number of options as a zoom lens does, the fixed focal length of a prime can actually be freeing. You can get close enough to the subject for interest, while retaining a wide enough angle of view to provide context. This, as well as the other great tips, apply to almost any subject you might be photographing.

http://digital-photography-school.com/10-tips-for-the-aspiring-street-photographer

DPS always has great photography tips covering a wide variety of topics. Sometimes they get a little bit specific, but sometimes that’s what makes them all the more interesting. Such is the case with a recent post offering tips for aspiring street photographers. Even if you’re not interested in street photography in particular, these are great... Read more

A sneak peak at Blair Bunting

If I could be any photographer, there’s a good chance I’d choose to be Blair Bunting. Not just because he’s super talented and a master of complex studio portrait lighting, but because he’s just 26 years old. That’s almost ten full years younger than me. What I would give to be young and talented. I recently had a nice long conversation with Blair, and now I’m even more impressed. I think he’s going to become a superstar—if he isn’t considered one already. Talented, humble, inquisitive, compassionate… He’s got a lot of qualities beyond pure lighting talent—which he possesses in spades. So if you’d like to get a sneak preview of an upcoming profile to appear in the pages of Digital Photo Pro, check out some of Blair’s newest work, updated weekly on his blog. 

http://blairbunting.com/blog

If I could be any photographer, there’s a good chance I’d choose to be Blair Bunting. Not just because he’s super talented and a master of complex studio portrait lighting, but because he’s just 26 years old. That’s almost ten full years younger than me. What I would give to be young and talented. I recently had a nice long... Read more
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