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Five Methods for Bouncing Light

For many photographers, bouncing light means just one thing...
By William Sawalich
For many photographers, bouncing light means just one thing: using a reflector to lighten a subject's shadow side. But bounced light can take many forms because it can be done for many reasons—like making "motivated light" or creating a softer, more natural looking source. Here are five examples of how…

Breaking Bad Photographic Habits

We all have them. They come in infinite forms
By William Sawalich
We all have them. They come in infinite forms. They're bad habits, from chewing with your mouth open to biting your nails. But the worst habits of all are the ones that compromise your photographs. If you want to start improving your photography, start working to break these habits. •…

Use A Hard Light For Portraits With Pop

The rules of portraiture say you have to use soft light to make your subjects look their best
By William Sawalich
The rules of portraiture say you have to use soft light to make your subjects look their best. While it's true that soft light (from diffused sources like windows and softboxes) is definitely flattering for faces, it can also be somewhat boring when it's not used carefully. So sometimes I…

How To Insure Photography Equipment

I recently suffered through a flood at my studio that caused many thousands of dollars in damage and many months of headaches
By William Sawalich
I recently suffered through a flood at my studio that caused many thousands of dollars in damage and many months of headaches. Thankfully, though, we didn't lose any expensive camera equipment, and the computers, furniture and structures we did lose were covered by insurance. It got me thinking, though, about…

Photographing Clear Objects

Lighting stuff is easy, right? You just point a light at it, and you can see it.
By William Sawalich
Lighting stuff is easy, right? You just point a light at it, and you can see it. But what if the thing you're trying to photograph is transparent—as in crystal clear? In that case, simply pointing a light at it won't work. You have to concern yourself with what can…

Histogram Exposure Adjustments in Lightroom

We all know what a good histogram should look like, right?
By William Sawalich
We all know what a good histogram should look like, right? A "normal" scene should not be too heavily weighted toward the left side of the histogram—the shadow side—or else we risk underexposure. Likewise, a normal scene's histogram shouldn't spike heavily toward the right, the highlight side, or the image…
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