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In the market for new digital imaging hardware? Before you invest, read our photography hardware reviews to help you choose the best equipment for your budget.



Buyer's Guide 2005: At The Camera Counter
A digital camera buyer's checklist
Buyer's Guide 2005: At The Camera Counter

After nearly seven years as an editor here at PCPhoto, I recently purchased my first digital camera. I've been shooting with digital cameras all along, but since there's a constant flow of the latest and greatest equipment through our offices, I never felt compelled to commit myself to a purchase. Content with just borrowing a camera for a time, I was reluctant to buy because I assumed that something better would always be on the horizon.


Trade Tricks: Computer-Less Downloads
View, copy and safeguard your digital photographs in the field
Trade Tricks: Computer-Less Downloads

Photographers are investing in higher-capacity memory cards and most of us are happily filling them up with digital images. If nature abhors a vacuum, then photographers dislike empty space on a card. But what happens if you aren't close enough to a desktop computer to download those hundreds of photographs?


Think BIG!
Photography is all about the details. Larger monitors give you a better perspective on your images.
Think BIG!

If you're tired of squinting to view menu items on your digital camera's LCD or feeling cramped by all of the palettes in Photoshop, maybe it's time to think outside the confines of tiny monitors. Even if you have perfect vision, there's no comparison to the viewing comfort and enhanced usability of screens with more real estate.


Trade Tricks: Easy Color Management
For the best prints, take control over your color
Trade Tricks: Easy Color ManagementWhen your goal is to create a beautiful print, understanding basic color management is a key component in the digital darkroom. Because monitors and papers are two completely different media, it's important to realize your print isn't going to be an exact match of what you see on your screen. If you continually test your printer's capabilities, however, much like you would with various filters and papers in a traditional darkroom, you may end up developing interesting techniques. What really matters in the whole process is whether you like your end result.

Short Report: Epson Stylus Photo RX620
This all-in-one printer and scanner offers great quality and convenience
Short Report: Epson Stylus Photo RX620

Not too many years ago, the all-in-one printer and scanner was handy, but not particularly useful for the photo enthusiast. How that has changed! The Epson Stylus Photo RX620 is designed for some serious photo usage. Right from the start, the specs are impressive: 2,400 dpi scanning with 48-bit color, four memory card slots, a 2.5-inch color LCD for previews, 35mm slide and negative scanning, and six-color inkjet printing.


Printing Pleasures
Experience the joy of photography with the latest in inkjet printers and papers
Printing Pleasures

I was 12 years old when I created my first print. The small darkroom was filled with the red glow of the safelight and the strong chemical scent of fixer. I looked down at the developing tray, the liquid sloshing back and forth over the submersed white paper. Slowly, I saw it, the first hints of an emerging image. As I agitated the plastic tray, the moment I had captured with my camera came to life in front of my eyes.


Think Ink: Buyer's Guide To Inkjet Inks
Often overlooked, printer inks are a key component of the digital darkroom
Think Ink: Buyer's Guide To Inkjet Inks

When shopping for a photo printer, you'll probably consider physical dimensions, print speeds, resolution and droplet size, plus extra bells and whistles such as a built-in card reader and LCD, all of which are important. Some of these features enhance the usability of the printer, while others affect print quality.


Match-Making
Get your monitor to accurately portray the colors of your digital photos
Match-MakingI was thrilled when I bought my first inkjet printer and couldn't wait to make my first color print. After spending about half an hour perfecting the portrait photograph in Photoshop, I sent the image to the printer and was immediately disappointed. If the person had been a visiting extraterrestrial or suffering from jaundice, the yellowish skin tone might have been acceptable. Neither was the case. I was just another photographer experiencing the frustration of having an inkjet print that didn't match what was on the monitor.

Buyer's Guide 2006: Printers
Expect photos with better color and longer life from today's printers
Buyer's Guide 2006: Printers

While looking at a photograph on a camera's LCD or a large computer monitor is exciting, neither replaces the satisfaction of holding a quality print. Improvements in the stability of inks have led to inkjet printers producing archival-quality prints that resist fading for a lifetime. Enhanced ink-delivery systems have meant smaller and smaller ink droplets, creating seamless transitions of color and tone that are virtually indiscernible. And whether you enjoy processing your images first or prefer making prints fast and easy, printers feature advanced color management for optimal control and built-in software drivers for prints without a computer.


Buyer's Guide 2006: Speedy, Spacious Storage
Solutions for creating a reliable digital image library
Buyer's Guide 2006: Speedy, Spacious Storage

Spaceā€”the final frontier or a simple necessity? Because digital imaging has picked up speed in the past few years, the need for extensive amounts of digital storage space has intensified. Replacing the temperature-controlled closets that film shooters used to store processed film is now the hard drive library.


Buyer's Guide 2006: Monitor Calibration
Achieve accurate color on your screen using these tools
Buyer's Guide 2006: Monitor Calibration

If you've ever been frustrated with prints that don't match what you see on your monitor, you understand the importance of color management. Having a calibrated monitor allows you to make changes to an image with confidence because the colors displayed on the screen are an accurate reflection of the file. In addition, it helps ensure that the color values you see on the screen will closely match your output.




 
 

 
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