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Any seasoned photographer will tell you to choose a quality camera lens. Start your research with our digital camera lens reviews today.



Short Report: Sigma APO Macro 150mm ƒ/2.8
This fast, telephoto macro lens offers a great deal of versatility for field shooting
Short Report: Sigma APO Macro 150mm ƒ/2.8

I love being surprised by the world, and a macro lens is a great way to discover those surprises. A macro lens lets you isolate and focus in on the often amazing and unexpected details around us. I had the chance to work with Sigma's new 150mm ƒ/2.8 macro lens (officially, APO Macro 150mm ƒ/2.8 EX DG HSM), and this combination of focal length and wide aperture offered a wonderful experience in exploring the realm of the close-up.


Short Report: Canon EF 24-105mm ƒ/4L IS USM
The new L-Series zoom delivers under demanding lighting conditions
Short Report: Canon EF 24-105mm ƒ/4L IS USM

The appeal of the Canon EF 24-105mm ƒ/4L IS USM is two-fold for me. The lens offers the zoom range that I frequently use for most of my photography. The equivalent of a 38-168mm lens on my Canon EOS 20D, it provides me with the flexibility to shoot virtually any subject, from portraits to street scenes. Additionally, its Image Stabilizer feature helps ensure that I get sharp results despite hands that aren't as steady as they used to be.


Short Report: Tamron AF18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di-II
Get true wide-to-tele performance with this extreme-range zoom designed for digital
Short Report: Tamron AF18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di-II

Users of 35mm SLRs have long enjoyed extreme-range zoom lenses of 28-200mm and, more recently, 28-300mm. These lenses can be used on digital SLRs, too, but since most D-SLRs have image sensors that are considerably smaller than a full 35mm film frame, these zooms provide a much narrower field of view when used on D-SLRs—equivalent to 42-300mm and 42-450mm on a 35mm SLR.


Wide-Angle Lenses For Digital
Yes, you can do wide-angle photography with a D-SLR!
Wide-Angle Lenses For Digital

Wide-angle photography opens up vast new vistas to the photographer, but "going wide" presents a special challenge to the digital-SLR user. That's because the image sensors used in most D-SLRs are considerably smaller than a 35mm film frame and thus "see" a smaller portion of the image produced by any lens than that seen by a 35mm SLR. As a result, a given focal length produces a narrower angle of view when used on a D-SLR than when used on a 35mm camera.


Buyer's Guide 2007: Lens Strategy
How to select the right mix of lenses for your photography
Buyer's Guide 2007: Lens Strategy

To get the most out of your D-SLR system, you'll want to choose a variety of lenses that offer the focal lengths, speed and features that match well with your favorite subjects. The key to selecting the right lenses is in understanding their capabilities and limitations and the types of photography and situations to which each is best suited.jjj


Lenses
LensesAlthough it may be more fun to shop for a new camera, a new lens probably will do more to spark creativity and open new possibilities.



 
 

 
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