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SLRs

There's a lot of information out there about digital SLR cameras. Reviews from our expert photographers can help you choose a camera that best suits your needs.



Digital Camera Anatomy
Digital Camera Anatomy

Photographers who have used 35mm film SLRs will mostly feel right at home with a digital SLR. The basic ergonomics, body design and control placement of most digital SLRs is quite similar to their film-based siblings. The buttons and dials used for attaching a lens, changing shutter speeds and apertures, checking depth of field and setting focus and exposure metering on D-SLRs remain basically unchanged from familiar 35mm camera body designs.


Beyond Megapixels
Today's camera manufacturers are thinking about more than pixels
Beyond Megapixels

The recent history of digital photography could be described as a megapixel war. With technological advancements that often come every six months, new cameras with higher pixel counts are available almost constantly. It isn't uncommon for photographers to find themselves buying a digital camera to replace the model they purchased only the year before in the endless arms race to garner the most megapixels.


Short Report: Nikon D2x
The top-of-the-line D-SLR from Nikon features 12 megapixels, blistering speed and a bigger, brighter LCD
Short Report: Nikon D2x

For discriminating photographers, the Holy Grail in digital cameras in recent years has been the so-called full-frame image sensor. Such a sensor is the same physical size as a frame of 35mm film, and as a result, has no lens magnification factor. Nikon's newest high-end digital SLR, the D2x, isn't full frame, but with an extremely high-res sensor and professional-caliber features, it calls into question whether there's a real need for a full-frame sensor, especially in light of new wide-angle lenses designed just for digital.


Short Report: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT
A small camera combines with high-quality imaging in Canon's new D-SLR
Short Report: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT

I took the EOS Digital Rebel XT to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park earlier this year and was able to fit the camera with three lenses (a Canon EF 70-300mm DO zoom, a Canon EF-S 60mm macro and a Tamron 11-18mm wide-angle zoom) into a small waistpack.


Buyer's Guide 2006: Today's Digital SLRs
Features and resolution distinguish the latest cameras
Buyer's Guide 2006: Today's Digital SLRs

There's a definite visceral reaction when taking pictures with an SLR. The look of the camera and the way it seems to be an extension of my hand often evokes a sense that something wonderful is only a fraction of a second away. Although I've taken great photographs with a compact digital camera, a digital SLR provides the features and controls I often need to ensure I come away with the photograph I expect.


Short Report: Pentax K100D
Shake reduction with every lens—at a very low price
Short Report: Pentax K100D

Several camera manufacturers offer lenses featuring built-in image-stabilizing mechanisms that counteract camera shake, and these work extremely well. But you enjoy those stabilizing benefits only when using those particular lenses. More recently, other manufacturers have introduced D-SLRs with in-camera anti-shake mechanisms, which provide shake reduction with all lenses. The lowest priced of these is the new K100D from Pentax.


Hot New D-SLRs
How seven recently introduced models stack up
Hot New D-SLRs

With the biennial fall Photokina show in Germany always come many interesting product introductions. This year's batch included seven new feature-packed digital SLRs. All are scheduled to be on sale in the United States by the time you read this, except the Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro (which will be available in early 2007) and the Sigma SD14 (no release date as of this writing).


How To Choose A Digital SLR
What to look for...and look out for
How To Choose A Digital SLR

Choosing a digital SLR is a bit trickier than choosing a film SLR because you have all of the film-camera considerations, plus a number of digital aspects to weigh. One benefit, though, is that you can't go wrong with any of today's D-SLRs—they all offer lots of features, good performance and enough resolution to produce quality 12x18 inkjet prints.


Where Are Digital SLRs Going?
A conversation with Canon’s Chuck Westfall offers a glimpse of the future
Where Are Digital SLRs Going?

From the moment it was created, photography has been inseparably connected to technology. Born of light-sensitive substances coated on a metal plate and now evolved to today's CCD and CMOS sensors, photography's growth has been measured as much by its technological advances as it has by the creativity of its photographers.


Olympus EVOLT E-330
The tilting live-view LCD monitor meets the D-SLR
Olympus EVOLT E-330

I love digital SLRs and do just about all my shooting with them. D-SLRs have a couple of drawbacks, however. Dust can settle on the image sensor each time you change lenses, and you can't see the image live on the LCD monitor or tilt the monitor for odd-angle shots as you can with compact digital cameras.


Getting The Most From D-SLR Camera Systems
You bought more than just a camera body
Getting The Most From D-SLR Camera Systems

When you buy a compact digital camera, you buy a camera. But when you buy a digital SLR, you buy into a whole camera system. That SLR body accepts a wide range of lenses, flash units, viewfinder attachments, optional power sources and other accessories, all of which add tremendous versatility. So to get the most out of your purchase, you should look at the whole system, not just a particular camera model, when deciding which D-SLR to purchase.




 
 

 
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