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SLRs

There's a lot of information out there about digital SLR cameras. Reviews from our expert photographers can help you choose a camera that best suits your needs.



Top D-SLRs Under $1,000
Six cameras that deliver hot shots for a fistful of dollars
Top D-SLRs Under $1,000

It was just five years ago that Canon introduced the original EOS Digital Rebel, which became the first digital SLR to sell for less than $1,000. That was a big breakthrough, and today there are more than a dozen models selling for less than that, including some models selling for half the price.


Get Wet
Cameras and housings perfect for poolside
Get Wet

Whether you're content to shoot from shoreline or want to dive in to snorkeling or scuba, with the right accessories, your camera also can come along, without fear of damage. Underwater housings protect your gear from the elements—even the salty seaside air can wreak havoc, and sand is no friend either. So before you hit the beach, get your photo gear a swimsuit, too.


Sensors Exposed
More than just megapixels—what you need to know about your digital camera’s core component
Sensors Exposed

At the heart of every digital camera is an image sensor, a silicon chip that contains millions of tiny light-sensitive photodiodes. Each photodiode produces a pixel of the captured image, and the number of pixels (resolution) is the horsepower spec that gets the most attention. However, the quality of the final image isn't determined by the number of pixels alone. When comparing cameras and their sensor specs, you need to do more than merely count megapixels—there's a lot more about sensors that you'll want to consider.


9 New D-SLRs
Hot 2008 models add high-tech features for less money
9 New D-SLRsIf the first few months of 2008 are any indication, this will be another big year for D-SLRs. Nine D-SLR models have been introduced so far, adding many new choices in the entry-level and midrange categories. All offer 10 megapixels or more, and seven of them sell for $800 or less, including a 14-megapixel model. There's also a new 10-megapixel D-SLR with live-view capability for under $500. Interested? Let's check them out.

D-SLRS: Pro Vs. Enthusiast
We compare each brand’s entry-level models with its pro offerings to see what we’re getting dollar for dollar
D-SLRS: Pro Vs. Enthusiast

We all know that top-of-the-line pro digital SLRs cost a lot more than entry-level models. There often are huge differences in quality and performance between the two, but not always. Entry-level models are becoming increasingly sophisticated and capable of image quality that's even better than pro cameras produced just a few years ago. Some entry-level cameras even share some of the same components and features as the latest pro models within the same brand.


Sweet Spot D-SLRs
Between the pro and entry-level models lies a paradise of high-performance features, ease of use and excellent value
Sweet Spot D-SLRs

"Sweet-spot" D-SLRs are those between the entry-level models and the often much pricier, larger and heavier pro models. They're in the sweet spot because, though they're much closer to the entry-level models in price, they share a lot of features with pro models. That makes them great choices for many photographers, including pros on a budget and enthusiasts alike.


D-SLR Systems
Get a grip on the complete offerings from the major camera makers when selecting your new D-SLR
D-SLR Systems

Buying a D-SLR is a little different than buying most other high-tech devices. You're also selecting a complete photo system, from lenses and flash to accessories and software. The "right" camera for your needs, present and future, depends a lot on what you expect from your system.


First Look: Sony Alpha DSLR-A700
The next generation of alpha switches to a newly designed, higher-res CMOS sensor, and that's just for starters
First Look: Sony Alpha DSLR-A700

Before Sony and Konica Minolta announced a partnership to develop Sony's first D-SLR in July 2005, Sony's previous contribution to the digital camera market had been limited to compacts and super-zoom advanced compacts. Then in March 2006, Konica Minolta announced it was leaving the photography business and transferring its camera technologies to Sony.


First Look: Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10
This new 10.1-megapixel D-SLR features a 2.5-inch rotating live-view monitor, face detection and much more
First Look: Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10

Panasonic's first D-SLR, the Lumix DMC-L1, was a 7.5-megapixel model similar in form and function to the Olympus EVOLT E-330, the first D-SLR to offer a live-view LCD monitor. Now Panasonic has introduced its second D-SLR, the 10.1-megapixel Lumix DMC-L10, with a more conventional appearance and a live-view monitor that tilts and rotates. The new camera is geared toward the compact digital camera user who wants such SLR advantages as interchangeable lenses and better image quality and autofocusing performance.


First Look: Olympus E-3
This fast, high-performance D-SLR is loaded with a powerful autofocus system, 5 fps continuous shooting, Live View and more.
First Look: Olympus E-3

Olympus has released the successor to its E-1 flagship D-SLR model, the 10.1-megapixel E-3. Designed to be the fastest autofocus D-SLR in the world, the E-3 has an articulated Live View LCD, internal image stabilization, TruePic III image processing, ISO sensitivity up to 3200 and a wide selection of other advanced features.


Buyer's Guide 2008: Advanced Compact Cameras
Travel light with high-megapixel, long-range zoom cameras
Buyer's Guide 2008: Advanced Compact Cameras

One lens, big zoom—that's the number-one benefit of advanced compact cameras compared to D-SLRs. You don't have to own multiple lenses to go from macro to wide-angle, then zoom out to well over 300mm—which also means you don't have to carry multiple lenses around when you travel.




 
 

 
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