Don't Focus And Recompose

I'm a "focus-then-recompose" kind of guy. This is not good. I always sensed I was neglecting some fairly robust camera focusing technology by falling back on this old-school approach, but it wasn't until I read this DPS blog post by James Brandon that I realized just how woefully inadequate this technique really is. Focusing then recomposing is the technique in which you point the center focus point in your viewfinder at the subject you want to photograph—say, an eye on a smiling face—and then (once focused properly) you recompose to create the composition that's most pleasing. The problem with this approach becomes visible in a few specific instances: at larger apertures, when working with longer lenses, and when you're a generally unsteady photographer. When you recompose you can actually change the distance between the focused point and your camera, meaning that the new plane of focus is actually behind the original (correct) one. That means that if your lens is long enough, your aperture large enough or your depth of field shallow enough, you're going to get an out-of-focus picture. See for yourself at the DPS blog, then get started—as I am—learning how to focus correctly using shifting focus points. 

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/the-problem-with-the-focus-recompose-method 
DPMag
I'm a "focus-then-recompose" kind of guy. This is not good. I always sensed I was neglecting some fairly robust camera focusing technology by falling back on this old-school approach, but it wasn't until I read this DPS blog post by James Brandon that I realized just how woefully inadequate this…

Long Exposures In Bright Sun

Everybody loves long exposures, right? You go out at night and open your shutter for a few minutes and let star trails or headlights or a simple moonlit landscape light up your sensor. Long exposures are a great way to bend time and motion and make them work within the confines of a still photograph, creating something that we humans just can't see with the naked eye. But what if you want to make long exposures sometime other than nighttime? What if you want to make long exposures during the day? Well thankfully Scott Kelby has recently posted a great video on exactly that subject at the Weekly Photo Tips blog. There are lots of tricks that help, but you definitely need a good neutral density filter and a tripod. Watch the video to see how Scott goes so far as to make a two-minute long exposure on a sunny day. 
 
http://weeklyphototips.blogspot.com/2011/07/long-exposure-tutorial-with-scott-kelby.html
DPMag
Everybody loves long exposures, right? You go out at night and open your shutter for a few minutes and let star trails or headlights or a simple moonlit landscape light up your sensor. Long exposures are a great way to bend time and motion and make them work within the…

A Stop-Motion Spectacle

Ever wonder what the flight from San Francisco to Paris really looks like from a window seat? Thanks to photographer "Boltron" (real name Nate Bolt; don't you just love the Internet age?) now you can see for yourself. Mr. Bolt made a time-lapse video called "San Francisco to Paris in Two Minutes." He shot a photo every couple of miles between take off and landing—documenting exotic sites including a gorgeous starlit dance with the aurora borealis—and constructed a very unique video out of the thousands of frames. I find it amazing that he was able to set up his tripod and time-lapse rig without causing too much ruckus among flight crew and fellow passengers. Check out the video on YouTube, and see more of his time-lapse projects at his Beep Show Tumblr blog.
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j36Erxd5rc
www.beepshow.com
DPMag
Ever wonder what the flight from San Francisco to Paris really looks like from a window seat? Thanks to photographer "Boltron" (real name Nate Bolt; don't you just love the Internet age?) now you can see for yourself. Mr. Bolt made a time-lapse video called "San Francisco to Paris in…

Speed Up Lightroom

I'm a Lightroom user. Practically every photograph I take is imported via Lightroom into my computer, and I also count on the program to organize, edit and archive my image files. Because of my reliance on the software, I'm expressly interested in various ways to make it run faster. Speeding up the workflow is especially useful when importing hundreds or thousands of image files, and I do that fairly regularly too. I know I'm not alone, so I'm confident there are plenty of you chomping at the bit for me to get to the point. A recent DPS article offers ten tips to improve the speed and performance of Lightroom. Lest you worry that one of the tips is something akin to "buy a faster computer" each of them is built around software enhancements—none require the acquisition of additional hardware. I've already made some of these changes, and I'm going to make the others right away.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/10-tips-to-improve-lightrooms-speed-and-performance-without-additional-hardware
DPMag
I'm a Lightroom user. Practically every photograph I take is imported via Lightroom into my computer, and I also count on the program to organize, edit and archive my image files. Because of my reliance on the software, I'm expressly interested in various ways to make it run faster. Speeding…

50 Years Of Jerry Uelsmann

Think of this as a multipurpose post. On the one hand, if you're already aware of the mastery of black & white darkroom wizard Jerry Uelsmann and his ethereal, otherworldly photographic constructions, then this post can simply serve to make you aware of a new gallery show highlighting work from throughout his 50-year career at the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, California. If you're anywhere near the Central Coast, make time in the next couple of months to visit his "Dances with Negatives" exhibition. The other purpose of this post is as an introduction for the unfortunate folks who aren't yet familiar with Mr. Uelsmann's fantastic photographs. So, for their information, Jerry Uelsmann is an amazing photographer you should definitely know about. Learn more about him at his web site, and at the Center for Photographic Arts web site as well. 

www.photography.org
www.uelsmann.net

DPMag
Think of this as a multipurpose post. On the one hand, if you're already aware of the mastery of black & white darkroom wizard Jerry Uelsmann and his ethereal, otherworldly photographic constructions, then this post can simply serve to make you aware of a new gallery show highlighting work from…

How To Photograph In Museums And Galleries

Every time I'm in a museum I think about how wonderful it would be to photograph what I’m seeing. There are so many opportunities to make great photos, so many beautiful subjects, so many beautiful rooms, so much wonderful light. Yet my museum images are never quite as great as I think they could be. The fact is, museums can be kind of tricky to photograph. If you've ever felt this way, or if you’re planning a trip that includes a museum visit, check out these tips from Tom Dinning at the Lightstalking blog He’ll help teach you how to photograph museums and galleries, and along with his helpful tips is a great collection of images made in these places as well. 
http://www.lightstalking.com/how-to-photograph-museums-and-galleries
Photo by Tom Dinning
DPMag
Every time I'm in a museum I think about how wonderful it would be to photograph what I’m seeing. There are so many opportunities to make great photos, so many beautiful subjects, so many beautiful rooms, so much wonderful light. Yet my museum images are never quite as great as…
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