A New Take On Underwater Photography

Ever wonder what would happen if you dropped your D-SLR into the sea? Well now we know: the camera might be kaput, but your pictures would likely remain intact on the CF card for a long, long time. Chase Jarvis linked to the story of Markus Thompson, a diver who recently found a Digital Rebel at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. He brought the camera to the surface, salvaged its memory card and was actually able to download the data. That in itself is cool enough to be noteworthy, but the story gets even better. Given the connected world we live in, perhaps it's no surprise that Thompson wanted to find the camera's rightful owner in order to deliver the photos. And he did. Read all about it at Jarvis's blog, then click through to Thompson's original Google+ post to see how the recovery unfolded.

http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/11/your-photo-data-is-safe-underwater

DPMag
Ever wonder what would happen if you dropped your D-SLR into the sea? Well now we know: the camera might be kaput, but your pictures would likely remain intact on the CF card for a long, long time. Chase Jarvis linked to the story of Markus Thompson, a diver who…

A Stunning Time Lapse Of Our Planet

Digital Photography Review recently linked to a phenomenal video created by combining still photographs shot by the International Space Station. The clips were compiled by German videographer Michael Konig who set them to music and turned them into something especially breathtaking. The NASA photos are beautiful on their own, but this is yet another example of how multimedia projects not only serve to showcase exceptional photography in a wonderful way, but to tell a story more completely. You really do get a sense for our planet's place in things, our human footprint, the way weather works and even a hint at what it must be like to float above it all in space.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2011/11/14/MichaelKonigNASAvideo

DPMag
Digital Photography Review recently linked to a phenomenal video created by combining still photographs shot by the International Space Station. The clips were compiled by German videographer Michael Konig who set them to music and turned them into something especially breathtaking. The NASA photos are beautiful on their own, but…

My Favorite Photographer’s Newest Book

Just in time to really get your holiday shopping in full swing, here's a post from The Online Photographer about one of my all-time favorite photographers: Andre Kertesz. I'd have to say that this post lauds the man in a way I fully endorse, and it was prompted by the author having trouble finding currently in print books about Kertesz. A new book was released around this time last year, called simply Kertesz, and it's received quite a glowing review here. I know I'd be happy to find this book in my stocking, as would any photographer on your list—whether they love Kertesz already or not. His work is an inspiration whether you're a beginner or an established pro.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/07/that-most-poetic-of-photographers.html

DPMag
Just in time to really get your holiday shopping in full swing, here's a post from The Online Photographer about one of my all-time favorite photographers: Andre Kertesz. I'd have to say that this post lauds the man in a way I fully endorse, and it was prompted by the…

Awesome Fill Flash Hack

I've always been the kind of guy who has relied on a simple rubber band and bit of white cardboard to create the perfect bounce for my flash. Sure it looks a little chintzy, but it definitely does get the job done—and at a literal fraction of the cost of fancier systems. The key is that you want to point the flash straight up and let the white card provide a softer, more diffused flash illumination of the subject. Then a guy named Gary Fong invented his "Lightsphere" and I thought it seemed pretty cool—and unlike what my simple card could achieve. The Lightsphere diffuses the flash in every direction, making it very broad, very omni-directional, and a very good idea. Apparently it's a good seller, too—as any device that actually solves a problem so well should be. Still, for those of us who prefer something a little more hacked together there's got to be another way to build this mousetrap, right? Thanks to the DIY Photography blog I now know what that is: a translucent plastic cup. For me any homemade hack has to be simple and minimal at its essence; I don't want to be gluing and cutting and taping a bunch of things together. That can be more trouble than it's worth. But simply slapping a disposable cup on my flash—that's something I can get my head around. And I bet I'll get a few more strange looks than I do with even my homemade cardboard bounce card rubberbanded to my speedlight. Check it out at diyphotography.net, and click through to the original inventor's Flickr stream as well.

http://www.diyphotography.net/quick-tip-a-plastic-cup-lightsphere

DPMag
I've always been the kind of guy who has relied on a simple rubber band and bit of white cardboard to create the perfect bounce for my flash. Sure it looks a little chintzy, but it definitely does get the job done—and at a literal fraction of the cost of…

Kickstarter And The EZ Steady

One of my favorite trends in this web three-point-whatever era is the Kickstarter photo device. I suppose all sorts of industries have flooded the Kickstarter site with devices for sale by entrepreneurial inventors, but the photo market sure does seem perfect for it. After all, we're so often looking for a better mousetrap, and anyone who can make even a decent mousetrap at a significant cost savings… well, we're happy to spend our money with them. I've seen camera straps and buckles and quick releases and all sorts of successful photographic accessories get rousingly funded via Kickstarter, and so it is with the most recent device worthy of your consideration. It's the EZ Steady camera stabilizer. It works with a gimbal and counterweight to make it possible to handhold your D-SLR while shooting video. That's no small achievement, as anyone who's tried to handhold a D-SLR for video knows. For a $225 contribution you'll get your own EZ Steady shipped straight to you in January—saving 100 bucks off the eventual retail price. We've ordered one at my studio already, and I'm looking forward to shooting some handheld video with it—almost as much as I'm looking forward to the EZ Steady's promised simple setup process. If you want to shoot handheld video on a budget, you may want to have a look at this, quick.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1851477510/ez-steady-dslr-camera-stabilizer

DPMag
One of my favorite trends in this web three-point-whatever era is the Kickstarter photo device. I suppose all sorts of industries have flooded the Kickstarter site with devices for sale by entrepreneurial inventors, but the photo market sure does seem perfect for it. After all, we're so often looking for…

Simply Sublime Snakes

Sometimes all I want to do is see beautiful photographs for no particular reason, so that's what I've got for you today. Los Angeles-based advertising photographer Mark Laita has been working on an interesting personal project that's taken him around the world to zoos, breeders and laboratories in order to photograph the world's deadliest snakes. It just so happens that these animals are also amazingly beautiful and photogenic as well. Check out a sampling at the Feature Shoot blog, then head over to Mr. Laita's web site to see more of the Serpentine project, as well as a variety of his other work.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2011/11/graphic-and-breathtaking-snakes-photographed-by-mark-laita
http://www.marklaita.com

DPMag
Sometimes all I want to do is see beautiful photographs for no particular reason, so that's what I've got for you today. Los Angeles-based advertising photographer Mark Laita has been working on an interesting personal project that's taken him around the world to zoos, breeders and laboratories in order to…
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