The Abstract Art Of The Droplet

As long as I'm getting artsy with my posts this week, here's one that's about abstract photography. Courtesy of the Feature Shoot photo blog, I just learned about the interesting abstract water drop photography of Markus Reugels. This German macro specialist doesn't just shoot water drops, though, he uses liquids of a variety of colors and shoots them flowing, splashing and exploding—the latter involves dropping liquids into a water bath and inverting the finished images so that they look more like literal explosions of color rather than simple drops and splashes. His photographs represent one of the things that I find so great about macro photography: the way it can transform something so simple and straightforward into something so uniquely special. See more at the Feature Shoot blog, then head over to Mr. Reugels' 500px site for a whole lot more of his colorful work.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2011/11/explosions-of-color-and-liquid-shot-by-macro-photographer-markus-reugels
http://500px.com/MarkusReugels

DPMag
As long as I'm getting artsy with my posts this week, here's one that's about abstract photography. Courtesy of the Feature Shoot photo blog, I just learned about the interesting abstract water drop photography of Markus Reugels. This German macro specialist doesn't just shoot water drops, though, he uses liquids…

Beautifully Surreal Photocollage

By day Matt Wisniewski is a web programmer. But as far as I'm concerned his real talent lies in the realm of photocollage. Though he's not a photographer, he works with photographs and collaborates with photographers to create beautiful, surreal collage portraits. I'm usually no big fan of surrealism in photography; there are very few artists who I think really transcend the hokey and make something beautiful, inspiring, and wonderful. I think Mr. Wisniewski belongs in that rarified group. See more of his work at his web site, and send him a message if you're a photographer interested in collaborating with a very talented artist.

http://mattw.us/images

DPMag
By day Matt Wisniewski is a web programmer. But as far as I'm concerned his real talent lies in the realm of photocollage. Though he's not a photographer, he works with photographs and collaborates with photographers to create beautiful, surreal collage portraits. I'm usually no big fan of surrealism in…

An Over-The-Counter Tripod Hack

Finally someone smartened up to realize that A, some photographers don't want to build their own DIY camera hacks, and B, some photographers just don't want to carry a tripod, no matter how compact and convenient it might be. Well a couple of years ago I wrote about how to build a string tripod (which I still advise as a great way to help steady your camera when you don't have a tripod at hand) and now finally someone smarter than me has built one to sell to the mass market. It's from Photojojo (of course!) and it's called the Pocket Pod. This palm-sized device works the same way as a homemade string tripod: it affixes to the bottom of the camera's tripod socket and then you pull a string down to the ground, step on it with your toe and pull the line taught to create enough tension to steady the camera. It really works well, whether purchased or homemade. Though the $24 over-the-counter variety is considerably less expensive than many camera accessories, it's still a bit of a premium over the few bucks of screws and string you'd spend to build the DIY model.

http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/pocket-pod

DPMag
Finally someone smartened up to realize that A, some photographers don't want to build their own DIY camera hacks, and B, some photographers just don't want to carry a tripod, no matter how compact and convenient it might be. Well a couple of years ago I wrote about how to…

A Photographic Menagerie

I've been a fan of the photography of Sharon Montrose for several years now. In fact, I've got one of her pictures hanging on my wall. It's a beautiful portrait of a mccaw. Yes, that's right, she makes bird portraits. And donkey portraits. And monkeys and owls and porcupines. She makes sublime images of all sorts of animals, and they're somehow dignified and funny and beautiful all at once. They're simply wonderful, which is why I was thrilled to learn of her brand new book, Menagerie. I'm definitely going to be purchasing a few of these to hand out as gifts this holiday season. It seems like a perfect present for anyone from designers to animal lovers to kids. Check out more of Sharon's work at her commercial site, or order a signed copy of the book or art prints of her images at her Animal Print Shop web site.

http://www.theanimalprintshop.com/menagerie-signed-copy

DPMag
I've been a fan of the photography of Sharon Montrose for several years now. In fact, I've got one of her pictures hanging on my wall. It's a beautiful portrait of a mccaw. Yes, that's right, she makes bird portraits. And donkey portraits. And monkeys and owls and porcupines. She…

Wanna Get A Lytro?

Do you want to get your hands on your very own light field camera? You know, Lytro—the new imaging technology that captures a broad field of light rather than focusing it into a single plane. That means much the same way you can adjust exposure and color in a RAW image file, Lytro allows you to change your point of focus after the picture is already made. It's pretty impressive, and a glimpse into what sure seems bound to eventually make its way into D-SLRs if it's even one-tenth as good as it looks to be. But until then, it's in a colorful little device unlike any other camera you've seen. You can actually get your hands on this interesting gadget at special demonstrations; the Wired store in New York City has Lytros to test, or you can register on the Lytro web site and vote to bring a demo day to a city near you.

http://blog.lytro.com/news/more-ways-to-get-your-hands-on-a-lytro

DPMag
Do you want to get your hands on your very own light field camera? You know, Lytro—the new imaging technology that captures a broad field of light rather than focusing it into a single plane. That means much the same way you can adjust exposure and color in a RAW…

Speed Up Lightroom

I write the DPmag.com "Tip of the Week" column, in which I try to impart some wisdom to help readers figure out how to do something better in their photographs. It can be almost anything, really, from shooting to lighting to retouching and organizing, but there are lots of little hints and tips that I don't often share because they're a little too small to turn into a whole column. So I'm going to start including some of those smaller tips here in the DPmag.com blog. To that end, my tip for today is helpful if you do a lot of organizing and editing in Lightroom. I'm frequently faced with a folder of 50 or 100 or several hundred images that I want to sort through in order to select my favorites. You can scroll through the images quickly and easily in Lightroom, but I've found that sometimes you're forced to wait while the software renders an individual preview image in a viewable form. This can slow down your editing immensely—unless you happen to know this tip. You can tell the program to render the previews ahead of time, so that as you scroll through the images there's no delay. To do this, simply choose "Render standard-sized previews" under the Previews heading of the library menu. Depending on how many images are in the folder it could take a minute or two, but the time-savings as you browse becomes huge. This is one of my favorite little tips, and I plan to share more of them with you here from now on. And if you'd like more in-depth advice, do check out our Tip of the Week as well by following the link below.

http://www.dpmag.com/how-to/tip-of-the-week.html

DPMag
I write the DPmag.com "Tip of the Week" column, in which I try to impart some wisdom to help readers figure out how to do something better in their photographs. It can be almost anything, really, from shooting to lighting to retouching and organizing, but there are lots of little…
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