Exploded Flowers

Sometimes I have to share something here just because it's so stunningly beautiful—even if I'm not sure I can provide an explicit photographic learning opportunity with the post. Such is the case today, when I direct you to seek out the Exploded Flowers project by "serious hobbyist" photographer Fong Qi Wei. Fong, who is based in Singapore, has really accomplished something quite simple and beautiful, and utterly unlike anything I've ever seen before. And it makes me gasp audibly every time I come back to it. Maybe the takeaway is this: sometimes great photography is not at all about technique or even execution, but simply a beautiful idea that produces a beautiful result.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2011/10/exploded-flowers-photographed-by-fong-qi-wei/

DPMag
Sometimes I have to share something here just because it's so stunningly beautiful—even if I'm not sure I can provide an explicit photographic learning opportunity with the post. Such is the case today, when I direct you to seek out the Exploded Flowers project by "serious hobbyist" photographer Fong Qi…

I Am The 13 Percent

When it comes to focusing your camera there are lots of ways to go about it. In the end, though, the choices really boil down to two options: autofocus or manual. I've always been a fan of manual focusing. I think it's because I learned this way in the pre-auto era, and I had some bad experiences missing shots because my early autofocusing cameras couldn't keep up with the action or because I was working in low light. As I get older I find that I rely on my eyes a little less and on the camera to autofocus a little more. These days I'd say I use manual focus most of the time, with a little bit of autofocus thrown in. And that, according to a recent poll at Digital Photography School, means that I'm in the 13% group. Turns out that most people, by far, use autofocus most of the time. In fact, three quarters of photographers rely on autofocus at least half of the time. That's a pretty significant group, I'd say. Check out the pie chart at DPS to see how the statistics break down, to figure out where you fall in comparison to other photographers, and to read some interesting and insightful comments from readers about how and why they choose to focus their cameras the way they do.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/how-photographers-focus-their-cameras-poll-results

DPMag
When it comes to focusing your camera there are lots of ways to go about it. In the end, though, the choices really boil down to two options: autofocus or manual. I've always been a fan of manual focusing. I think it's because I learned this way in the pre-auto…

Honoring Harold Feinstein

Harold Feinstein began his photographic career in 1946, and by the age of 20 his work had already been purchased by Edward Steichen for inclusion in the permanent collection of New York's Museum of Modern Art. A member of the famous Photo League, he rubbed elbows with the likes of Weegee, Winogrand and W. Eugene Smith, but when he declined inclusion in Steichen's now iconic Family of Man exhibition, he was soon left behind and forgotten by the art world and contemporary photography collectors. To that end his Boston gallerist began a Kickstarter campaign to raise $35,000 in order to print the first monograph of Feinstein's work. The goal has been easily reached, so the book will definitely be created, but check out the page to find great information about Mr. Feinstein and his work, as well as links to the photographer himself and those involved with finally creating a monograph for this undisputed modern master.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/589591535/harold-feinstein-a-retrospective

DPMag
Harold Feinstein began his photographic career in 1946, and by the age of 20 his work had already been purchased by Edward Steichen for inclusion in the permanent collection of New York's Museum of Modern Art. A member of the famous Photo League, he rubbed elbows with the likes of…

Brazen Camera Thieves

Believe it or not, gutsy camera thieves can actually steal the lens right off your D-SLR without you even noticing. And according to the BBC, they're actually doing it and getting away scot-free. The same quick release button that makes it easy for you to swap lenses on your camera body also makes it equally easy for shady characters to do the same when your camera's slung casually over your shoulder. Check out the Pixiq blog for the lowdown, to see video of master thieves in action, and for a bit of advice on how to protect yourself while traveling.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/lens-thieves
DPMag
Believe it or not, gutsy camera thieves can actually steal the lens right off your D-SLR without you even noticing. And according to the BBC, they're actually doing it and getting away scot-free. The same quick release button that makes it easy for you to swap lenses on your camera…

An Unseen Ad Campaign

I've been a fan of Blair Bunting's photography since I first saw one of his intense football portraits last year. His work's got an edgy, gritty look that lends itself to all sorts of subjects. Along with a portfolio full of athletes, Blair also photographs advertisements for some very popular reality TV shows, including my personal favorite—Discovery's Deadliest Catch. Fans of the show know that a beloved principal character, Captain Phil, died suddenly last year. It just so happened that Blair had been commissioned to shoot an ad campaign playing on the "cheating death" aspects of the violent nature of crab fishing. Running the campaign, which was completed just days before Captain Phil's death, would have been in poor taste, so it was cancelled. That was more than a year ago, but just last week Blair finally decided to show some of his favorite images from the unused campaign. Not only does Blair's blog currently show a great example of an image from the group, it also includes a neat behind the scenes video showing how he pulled the shots together in the studio. Check out the intense images and read about how Blair even used his own teeth to give an image a dose of gory reality.

http://www.blairbunting.com/blog/?p=2291

DPMag
I've been a fan of Blair Bunting's photography since I first saw one of his intense football portraits last year. His work's got an edgy, gritty look that lends itself to all sorts of subjects. Along with a portfolio full of athletes, Blair also photographs advertisements for some very popular…

Music For Your Multimedia

Vimeo has become a favorite outlet for video projects among those who relish high-quality video online. With minimal compression and maximum fidelity, Vimeo tends to cater to folks who are doing more than throwaway home videos. That’s partly why the company recently announced its own music store, specifically for creators who need music tracks to put into their videos—whether they’re made for commercial purposes or otherwise. With 45,000 tracks available in its library, and prices from free to $98 (depending on whether the project is personal or commercial) it’s a phenomenal resource for videographers—and for us photographers who are venturing into the ever-changing multimedia landscape. See for yourself at Vimeo, and then get to work on your next great masterpiece!

http://vimeo.com/musicstore

DPMag
Fall is finally here in my part of the world. Summer hung on for quite a while, but this week the crisp air of fall finally crept over my hometown. I’m guessing it’s doing the same for many readers, too. And that puts me in the mood for enjoying fall…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.