50 Years Of Jerry Uelsmann

Think of this as a multipurpose post. On the one hand, if you're already aware of the mastery of black & white darkroom wizard Jerry Uelsmann and his ethereal, otherworldly photographic constructions, then this post can simply serve to make you aware of a new gallery show highlighting work from throughout his 50-year career at the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, California. If you're anywhere near the Central Coast, make time in the next couple of months to visit his "Dances with Negatives" exhibition. The other purpose of this post is as an introduction for the unfortunate folks who aren't yet familiar with Mr. Uelsmann's fantastic photographs. So, for their information, Jerry Uelsmann is an amazing photographer you should definitely know about. Learn more about him at his web site, and at the Center for Photographic Arts web site as well. 

www.photography.org
www.uelsmann.net

DPMag
Think of this as a multipurpose post. On the one hand, if you're already aware of the mastery of black & white darkroom wizard Jerry Uelsmann and his ethereal, otherworldly photographic constructions, then this post can simply serve to make you aware of a new gallery show highlighting work from…

How To Photograph In Museums And Galleries

Every time I'm in a museum I think about how wonderful it would be to photograph what I’m seeing. There are so many opportunities to make great photos, so many beautiful subjects, so many beautiful rooms, so much wonderful light. Yet my museum images are never quite as great as I think they could be. The fact is, museums can be kind of tricky to photograph. If you've ever felt this way, or if you’re planning a trip that includes a museum visit, check out these tips from Tom Dinning at the Lightstalking blog He’ll help teach you how to photograph museums and galleries, and along with his helpful tips is a great collection of images made in these places as well. 
http://www.lightstalking.com/how-to-photograph-museums-and-galleries
Photo by Tom Dinning
DPMag
Every time I'm in a museum I think about how wonderful it would be to photograph what I’m seeing. There are so many opportunities to make great photos, so many beautiful subjects, so many beautiful rooms, so much wonderful light. Yet my museum images are never quite as great as…

Adobe’s New Carousel

Adobe just announced its new Carousel cloud-based system for storing, editing and sharing photographs. I like this cloud-based stuff, so I’m looking forward to checking out this subscription service. Maybe it’s because the cloud has been part of my photographic backup plan for more than a year, and I love it for that. It's also helped deliver my music where and when I want, and I love that too. So now if I can use the cloud to deliver my pictures wherever I want too, across computers and smart phones and multimedia devices, that seems like a pretty promising program that I’m sure to love as well. Sign up for yourself at the adobe web site, and then check out the Photoshop blog for a neat behind-the-scenes video about Carousel.

http://blogs.adobe.com/photoshopdotcom/2011/09/introducing-adobe-carousel-your-photos-everywhere-you-are.html
http://www.adobe.com/products/carousel.html
DPMag
Adobe just announced its new Carousel cloud-based system for storing, editing and sharing photographs. I like this cloud-based stuff, so I’m looking forward to checking out this subscription service. Maybe it’s because the cloud has been part of my photographic backup plan for more than a year, and I love…

How To Use The Unsharp Mask Filter

Image sharpness is a pretty critical thing. Photographers spend hours and days and years honing their craft in order to make sharper pictures. They spend thousands of dollars on the sharpest lenses, and then they—hopefully—apply the appropriate sharpening prior to output of a finished digital image file. There are lots of different tools for going about that last bit, and one of the most popular in Photoshop is the Smart Sharpen filter. But there's another filter that can be a powerful ally in the quest for sharpness, and that's the Unsharp Mask filter. Named for a traditional film process that creates the illusion of sharpness in a finished print, Unsharp Mask helps digital photographers in much the same way by enhancing contours and edges to increase the appearance of sharpness. John Paul Caponigro, master of digital imaging and, maybe even more valuable, master of explaining how to apply high-tech digital tools in an easy to comprehend manner, recently delved into Unsharp Mask on his blog, and it's a must read for anyone looking to add another powerful tool to their sharpening repertoire. 

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/6622/unsharp-mask/

DPMag
Image sharpness is a pretty critical thing. Photographers spend hours and days and years honing their craft in order to make sharper pictures. They spend thousands of dollars on the sharpest lenses, and then they—hopefully—apply the appropriate sharpening prior to output of a finished digital image file. There are lots…

Photographers, Know Your Rights

As someone who earns a living taking pictures, and frequently does so in public, I'm particularly attuned to issues involving the constitutionality of making pictures in public. So it was with bated breath that I read the Know Your Rights, Photographer post at the American Civil Liberties Union web site. It serves as a reminder that you have the right to make pictures in public spaces of anything that is in plain view. Unfortunately, some law enforcement officers (and, often, private security forces) aren't up to speed on the legality of photographing in public. So knowing the law, understanding your rights, and learning how to deal with someone who is detaining you can be a valuable skill for a photographer. I recommend that you brush up on your rights at the ACLU web site, and remember that no matter how “right” you may be, if you’re stopped by a police officer be sure to always remain polite and do not physically resist arrest. Knowing your rights might be protection enough.

http://www.aclu.org/free-speech/know-your-rights-photographers

DPMag
As someone who earns a living taking pictures, and frequently does so in public, I'm particularly attuned to issues involving the constitutionality of making pictures in public. So it was with bated breath that I read the Know Your Rights, Photographer post at the American Civil Liberties Union web site.…

When Not To Use Lens Stabilization

Image stabilization is a pretty amazing technological breakthrough, when you think about it. Your lens actually helps steady itself. Amazing! With built-in electromagnets and gyroscopes, vibration-reducing lenses counteract the camera shake caused by your unsteady hands, which is the cause of many blurry photos. First-gen stabilization was good for one stop, maybe two. That meant that if under normal circumstances it would require a shutter speed of 1/60th to get a sharp image, you could actually handhold at 1/30th or even 1/15th of a second with stabilization turned on and still get sharp photos. Recent advancements have manufacturers advertising up to four full stops of handholding power. That means in the scenario I just mentioned you could handhold safely all the way down to 1/4th of a second. But no matter how amazing lens stabilization technology gets, it still can't compensate for one thing: operator error. There's one crucial time when image stabilization actually causes blurrier photos—and that's when you've got your camera locked down to a tripod. Check out Steve Berardi's PhotoNaturalist blog for more info on when not to use lens stabilization to get sharp photos, including photographic evidence that shows just how blurry a stabilized image can be when used incorrectly.
http://photonaturalist.net/when-not-to-use-lens-stabilization/
Photo by Steve Berardi
DPMag
Image stabilization is a pretty amazing technological breakthrough, when you think about it. Your lens actually helps steady itself. Amazing! With built-in electromagnets and gyroscopes, vibration-reducing lenses counteract the camera shake caused by your unsteady hands, which is the cause of many blurry photos. First-gen stabilization was good for one…
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