The "Inception" Of Stop-Motion Movies

Did you see last year's hit movie "Inception?" I did, and while I understand that many folks found the dream-in-a-dream nature of the film a bit disorienting, it still managed to tell a unique story in a unique way and draw viewers in. The same can be said for this stop-motion movie from Neatorama.com. Eran Amir created a short film in which he photographed 500 different people holding more than 1500 different pictures, and when strung together they create a movie-within-a-movie vibe quite similar in effect to the disorienting construction of Inception. That's a convoluted way to say, "Wow, cool stop-motion film!" I could've just said "check out this cool movie that also has a stop-motion movie inside it," but that just doesn't seem as unique. No matter what you call it, it's a cool clip that you should definitely check out. 

http://www.neatorama.com/2011/08/29/the-inception-of-stop-motion-film/

DPMag
Did you see last year's hit movie "Inception?" I did, and while I understand that many folks found the dream-in-a-dream nature of the film a bit disorienting, it still managed to tell a unique story in a unique way and draw viewers in. The same can be said for this…

Anamorphic Projection Photographs

That's a fancy title for a pretty simple blog post. Sometimes somebody makes a picture that's just so cool and clever I have to tell others about it. That's the case with this image by artist Stephen Doyle. He created an anamorphic projection—a physical construction that when viewed in the ideal perspective takes the shape of another object. In this case, Doyle used simple blue tape to create a huge word—Grit—that served to illustrate a concept in a story about an educational program for the New York Times. When viewed just right, Doyle's long stripes of tape perfectly spell out the word. It's one of those things that's so simple and so creative it's inspiring. Read all about it and watch a "making of" video at the Colossal blog.

http://thisiscolossal.com/2011/09/anamorphic-tape-projection-by-doyle-partners/

DPMag
That's a fancy title for a pretty simple blog post. Sometimes somebody makes a picture that's just so cool and clever I have to tell others about it. That's the case with this image by artist Stephen Doyle. He created an anamorphic projection—a physical construction that when viewed in the…

Justin Timberlake Wants Your Pictures

Actor/musician/superstar Justin Timberlake is starring in a new movie called "In Time," and as part of the promotion for the film the Talenthouse creative collaboration web site is sponsoring a photography contest on J.T.'s behalf. Ten finalists will be selected (five via reader poll and the remaining five by Timberlake himself) before a grand prizewinner is ultimately chosen. The winning image will be featured at the premier of "In Time," and it will become Timberlake's actual Facebook profile picture for a full month—putting that photo in front of 12-million viewers. That's quite an audience for any photographer. Check out the contest at Talenthouse today.

http://www.talenthouse.com/justin-timberlake-your-photograph-featured

DPMag
Actor/musician/superstar Justin Timberlake is starring in a new movie called "In Time," and as part of the promotion for the film the Talenthouse creative collaboration web site is sponsoring a photography contest on J.T.'s behalf. Ten finalists will be selected (five via reader poll and the remaining five by Timberlake…

The Most Influential Cameras Ever

This blog post is really meta: it's a post about a post about a post. Mike Johnston, The Online Photographer, recently directed his readers to a great and controversial blog post listing the most influential cameras ever. Part of what makes the thing great, actually, is the built-in controversy. Compiled by Jason Schneider, the group—like all "best of" proclamations—is designed to incite a bit of outrage. That's what makes an exercise like this successful; it gets people talking. This list sure does, as you'll see both at the TOP blog and on the original post at the Adorama web site. My personal favorite on the list is the 1938 Kodak Super Six—just because it's such a neat looking camera. My favorite camera not on the list is the Nikon F4, which I used to hammer nails when it wasn't taking pictures. There are a few modern cameras that cause more than their fair share of controversy. Read for yourself and join the conversation, and maybe think about your own favorite cameras and where they might fit the list.

http://www.adorama.com/ALC/Article.aspx?alias=The-14-Most-Influential-Cameras-of-All-Time
http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/09/controversial-list-of-influential-cameras.html

DPMag
This blog post is really meta: it's a post about a post about a post. Mike Johnston, The Online Photographer, recently directed his readers to a great and controversial blog post listing the most influential cameras ever. Part of what makes the thing great, actually, is the built-in controversy. Compiled…

Don't Focus And Recompose

I'm a "focus-then-recompose" kind of guy. This is not good. I always sensed I was neglecting some fairly robust camera focusing technology by falling back on this old-school approach, but it wasn't until I read this DPS blog post by James Brandon that I realized just how woefully inadequate this technique really is. Focusing then recomposing is the technique in which you point the center focus point in your viewfinder at the subject you want to photograph—say, an eye on a smiling face—and then (once focused properly) you recompose to create the composition that's most pleasing. The problem with this approach becomes visible in a few specific instances: at larger apertures, when working with longer lenses, and when you're a generally unsteady photographer. When you recompose you can actually change the distance between the focused point and your camera, meaning that the new plane of focus is actually behind the original (correct) one. That means that if your lens is long enough, your aperture large enough or your depth of field shallow enough, you're going to get an out-of-focus picture. See for yourself at the DPS blog, then get started—as I am—learning how to focus correctly using shifting focus points. 

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/the-problem-with-the-focus-recompose-method 
DPMag
I'm a "focus-then-recompose" kind of guy. This is not good. I always sensed I was neglecting some fairly robust camera focusing technology by falling back on this old-school approach, but it wasn't until I read this DPS blog post by James Brandon that I realized just how woefully inadequate this…

Long Exposures In Bright Sun

Everybody loves long exposures, right? You go out at night and open your shutter for a few minutes and let star trails or headlights or a simple moonlit landscape light up your sensor. Long exposures are a great way to bend time and motion and make them work within the confines of a still photograph, creating something that we humans just can't see with the naked eye. But what if you want to make long exposures sometime other than nighttime? What if you want to make long exposures during the day? Well thankfully Scott Kelby has recently posted a great video on exactly that subject at the Weekly Photo Tips blog. There are lots of tricks that help, but you definitely need a good neutral density filter and a tripod. Watch the video to see how Scott goes so far as to make a two-minute long exposure on a sunny day. 
 
http://weeklyphototips.blogspot.com/2011/07/long-exposure-tutorial-with-scott-kelby.html
DPMag
Everybody loves long exposures, right? You go out at night and open your shutter for a few minutes and let star trails or headlights or a simple moonlit landscape light up your sensor. Long exposures are a great way to bend time and motion and make them work within the…
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