Photographers, Know Your Rights

As someone who earns a living taking pictures, and frequently does so in public, I'm particularly attuned to issues involving the constitutionality of making pictures in public. So it was with bated breath that I read the Know Your Rights, Photographer post at the American Civil Liberties Union web site. It serves as a reminder that you have the right to make pictures in public spaces of anything that is in plain view. Unfortunately, some law enforcement officers (and, often, private security forces) aren't up to speed on the legality of photographing in public. So knowing the law, understanding your rights, and learning how to deal with someone who is detaining you can be a valuable skill for a photographer. I recommend that you brush up on your rights at the ACLU web site, and remember that no matter how “right” you may be, if you’re stopped by a police officer be sure to always remain polite and do not physically resist arrest. Knowing your rights might be protection enough.

http://www.aclu.org/free-speech/know-your-rights-photographers

DPMag
As someone who earns a living taking pictures, and frequently does so in public, I'm particularly attuned to issues involving the constitutionality of making pictures in public. So it was with bated breath that I read the Know Your Rights, Photographer post at the American Civil Liberties Union web site.…

When Not To Use Lens Stabilization

Image stabilization is a pretty amazing technological breakthrough, when you think about it. Your lens actually helps steady itself. Amazing! With built-in electromagnets and gyroscopes, vibration-reducing lenses counteract the camera shake caused by your unsteady hands, which is the cause of many blurry photos. First-gen stabilization was good for one stop, maybe two. That meant that if under normal circumstances it would require a shutter speed of 1/60th to get a sharp image, you could actually handhold at 1/30th or even 1/15th of a second with stabilization turned on and still get sharp photos. Recent advancements have manufacturers advertising up to four full stops of handholding power. That means in the scenario I just mentioned you could handhold safely all the way down to 1/4th of a second. But no matter how amazing lens stabilization technology gets, it still can't compensate for one thing: operator error. There's one crucial time when image stabilization actually causes blurrier photos—and that's when you've got your camera locked down to a tripod. Check out Steve Berardi's PhotoNaturalist blog for more info on when not to use lens stabilization to get sharp photos, including photographic evidence that shows just how blurry a stabilized image can be when used incorrectly.
http://photonaturalist.net/when-not-to-use-lens-stabilization/
Photo by Steve Berardi
DPMag
Image stabilization is a pretty amazing technological breakthrough, when you think about it. Your lens actually helps steady itself. Amazing! With built-in electromagnets and gyroscopes, vibration-reducing lenses counteract the camera shake caused by your unsteady hands, which is the cause of many blurry photos. First-gen stabilization was good for one…

Photographers Recount Their 9/11 Experiences

In honor of the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the Associated Press has published interviews with its photojournalists who documented history unfolding in New York on that fateful day. For most of them, their cameras acted as shields to keep a crucial theoretical distance between themselves and the horrible events they were witnessing. Read more at the Associated Press web site, and in many newspapers throughout the country. Then visit the Time Magazine web site. They’ve also published a web gallery of 9/11 images, these from iconic photographer James Nachtwey whose images are every bit as poignant today as they were a decade ago. Time also has many other memorial projects in the works, including a photo book, a commemorative issue of the magazine and a full-length documentary feature film.

http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1660644_1442563,00.html
http://hosted2.ap.org/APDefault/*/Article_2011-08-11-Sept%2011-Iconic%20Images/id-25f4d95a3de74d9785ae03dde5260ab6
DPMag
In honor of the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the Associated Press has published interviews with its photojournalists who documented history unfolding in New York on that fateful day. For most of them, their cameras acted as shields to keep a crucial theoretical distance between themselves and the horrible…

New Work From An Old-School Master

Even laymen know a few iconic photographers by name—like Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Minor White. But there are also photographic pioneers who are just as important, though not nearly as known outside of the photo world. Perhaps no name is more unknown given how important he was in the world of landscape photography than that of Philip Hyde. Cited frequently as an inspiration to today’s landscape gurus, Hyde made his name as a pioneer in color photography while other icons were still working in black & white. Today, Hyde’s son David carries on his father’s legacy—most notably by publishing the Landscape Photography blog. While Hyde was known primarily for his color work, he also worked in black & white, and in a recent post David has brought to light more work from his father’s black & white catalog. Check it out at the Landscape Photography Blogger, and consider purchasing an authorized print—in color or black & white—from this photographic icon.

http://landscapephotographyblogger.com/events-releases/new-portfolio-yosemite-and-sierra-black-and-white-prints
DPMag
Even laymen know a few iconic photographers by name—like Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Minor White. But there are also photographic pioneers who are just as important, though not nearly as known outside of the photo world. Perhaps no name is more unknown given how important he was in the…

How To Make Your Own Time-Lapse Video

I'm always linking to time-lapse videos on this blog, mostly because I never seem to get enough of this super-simple, super-neat technique. So here’s a page that does contain a cool time-lapse video, but the real reason I’m pointing it out is because it’s a primer for photographers who not only want to watch cool time-lapse videos, but who also want to learn how to make them for themselves. It’s a little bit different, and a little bit fun. And best of all, any photographer with any camera can do it with just a tiny bit of know-how.

http://www.lightstalking.com/timelapse
DPMag
I'm always linking to time-lapse videos on this blog, mostly because I never seem to get enough of this super-simple, super-neat technique. So here’s a page that does contain a cool time-lapse video, but the real reason I’m pointing it out is because it’s a primer for photographers who not…

Keep Your Computer Cool For Better Performance

Photographers who use desktop computers might not think much about the temperatures of their machines, but I guarantee that any photographer who has edited image files on a laptop computer knows exactly where I’m going with this. When your computer heats up, its performance lags. And that’s extra annoying when you’re working to process your images. Here are two solutions that you can consider to help keep things cool, whether you’re using a laptop or a desktop. The first one is a tool I’m already using—a piece of software called Fan Control. You can dial it in to kick up your computer’s fan speeds at various temperature marks, so you can keep the optimum operating temperature exactly where you want it. Another option is something I just read about on one of my favorite blogs, Cool Tools. It’s a USB-powered external fan from Thermaltake. You can position it to blow cool air over your laptop, or to cool an external hard drive, or really any electrical component that you’d like. (Now that I think about it, there’s no reason you couldn’t use it to keep yourself cool while working on the computer—which could be necessary if your hot laptop is running especially slow.) If you visit the Thermaltake site in search of the USB fan, be sure to check out some of the cooling pads that are especially designed for improving temperatures in high-performance laptop applications.

http://www.lobotomo.com/products/FanControl
http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/005824.php
DPMag
Photographers who use desktop computers might not think much about the temperatures of their machines, but I guarantee that any photographer who has edited image files on a laptop computer knows exactly where I’m going with this. When your computer heats up, its performance lags. And that’s extra annoying when…
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