Behind The Scenes With Your Camera Sensor

Regular readers know how much I like a good behind-the-scenes video, whether that's behind the scenes of a photo shoot or behind the scenes in the manufacture of some product we all know and love. Well today's video fits closely with the latter category, as it's behind the scenes of the inner workings of a digital camera, and how the CCD sensor works. Sure, it's not exactly the same as a CMOS, but no matter what kind of digital camera you use an understanding of how light is turned into electrical signals, and how those signals are turned into pretty pictures, is not only very interesting but is a great way to help you understand what you can do to take better pictures.

http://digital-photography-school.com/how-ccd-sensors-work#close
DPMag
Regular readers know how much I like a good behind-the-scenes video, whether that's behind the scenes of a photo shoot or behind the scenes in the manufacture of some product we all know and love. Well today's video fits closely with the latter category, as it's behind the scenes of…

Waterfall Photography Advice

A great poet once said, "Don't go chasing waterfalls, please stick to the rivers and the lakes that you're used to." Well I don't think that poet knew what she was talking about, because waterfalls make for supremely interesting, beautiful photographic subjects. But only if you know how to make the most of them. With this tutorial by Eric Leslie at DPS, you get four solid tips for making gorgeous waterfall photos. Best of all, shooting waterfalls, no matter how small and insignificant they may be, is a great way to turn an otherwise ho-hum landscape into a photographic triumph. Before you head out on your next nature walk, prepare yourself with these tips by photographer Eric Leslie so you'll know how to shoot drop dead gorgeous waterfalls.

http://digital-photography-school.com/4-tips-for-shooting-drop-dead-gorgeous-waterfalls
DPMag
A great poet once said, "Don't go chasing waterfalls, please stick to the rivers and the lakes that you're used to." Well I don't think that poet knew what she was talking about, because waterfalls make for supremely interesting, beautiful photographic subjects. But only if you know how to make…

Behind The Scenes At A Filter Factory

Reading the always informative DIY Photography blog a few weeks back I came across this unique video. It's a behind the scenes tour of the Lee Filters factory in England. And while you might expect something like photographic filter manufacture to be a highly technical, fully automated process, in fact Lee uses a largely handmade approach to crafting their products. Some of the commenters seem to think that the handmade approach is inefficient and impractical, but I think if it's been serving the company well for a few decades, so why mess with success? Either way, it's a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes of the creation of these always valuable photographic tools.

http://www.diyphotography.net/how-lee-filters-are-made
DPMag
Reading the always informative DIY Photography blog a few weeks back I came across this unique video. It's a behind the scenes tour of the Lee Filters factory in England. And while you might expect something like photographic filter manufacture to be a highly technical, fully automated process, in fact…

Awesome Lighting Tutorial Videos

I like lighting tutorials. Sure, I'm a studio photographer and sure I work with lighting tools on a daily basis, but part of what makes this job so interesting is continually learning new techniques. (The internet is full of lighting tutorials so it's a pretty easy way to keep learning about photography without worrying about ponying up for tuition.) But while it's often the case that lighting tutorials are interesting—if for no other reason than it's neat to watch photographers work—it's rare that I think they're especially useful for audiences comprised of both newbies and experts. Such is the case with The Slanted Lens web site and its series of exceptional lighting tutorial videos. Not only do they serve as tremendous technical explanations of particular light modifiers—like Octodomes, Softboxes and Beauty Dishes—but they really show practical hands-on uses of these tools and how they differ subtly from one another. Whether you want to know about how they change at different distances or when using modifiers of different sizes, it's really a great starting place for studio lighting techniques. And those techniques, in my opinion, translate across all photographic disciplines.

http://theslantedlens.com/2012/understanding-octodomesocto-boxes-a-lighting-tutorial
DPMag
I like lighting tutorials. Sure, I'm a studio photographer and sure I work with lighting tools on a daily basis, but part of what makes this job so interesting is continually learning new techniques. (The internet is full of lighting tutorials so it's a pretty easy way to keep learning…

Awesome Insect Eyes

I don't generally send you to photo galleries just to look at neat pictures; I figure there are plenty of places to get your fill of those on the Internet. But every once in a while something strikes me as just so dang cool that I can't help but point it out. The astronaut star trails were just such a case earlier this week, and from supercool shots on the macro scale, how about equally amazing images at the opposite end of the unseen spectrum—the microscopic world of insects. So today I present you with an amazing collection of gorgeous photos of not just insects, but little parts of insects. Insect eyes, in fact. That's right: microscopic images of bugs eyes that are not only really interesting for their ability to show us something we can't normally see with the naked eye, but they're also really beautiful works of art. Photographer Shikhei Goh is clearly a master of this microscopic domain.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/06/magnificent-macro-photos-of-insect-eyes-by-shikhei-goh
DPMag
I don't generally send you to photo galleries just to look at neat pictures; I figure there are plenty of places to get your fill of those on the Internet. But every once in a while something strikes me as just so dang cool that I can't help but point…

Product Photography Tutorials

I teach a studio product photography class, so I've seen my fair share of product photos—from mediocre to outstanding. This collection of images from Alex Koloskov is not only pretty great, but it's a great teaching tool as well. And that's something pretty darn appealing me; I'm always looking for a way to teach certain fundamental photographic techniques on which all studio product photography is based. Translucent subjects, specular surfaces, splashes and motion… These are things I spend time specifically teaching week after week in my class, and I know how important these fundamentals are if you want to learn about lighting. So if you're interested in learning more about still life photography, or more importantly how those lighting techniques can be applied across a number of other photographic disciplines, you absolutely must check out these tutorials and behind the scenes videos Mr. Koloskov has posted at Pixiq.com.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/studio-photography-digest
DPMag
I teach a studio product photography class, so I've seen my fair share of product photos—from mediocre to outstanding. This collection of images from Alex Koloskov is not only pretty great, but it's a great teaching tool as well. And that's something pretty darn appealing me; I'm always looking for…
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