How To Go To Iceland

I have long wanted to visit Iceland on a photographic tour. And based on the number of images I've seen from the tiny island in recent years, I'm not nearly the only one. Perhaps it's the almost martian volcanic landscape, the wild horses, or simply the remote oddity of the place, but one thing's for sure: American photographers are enthralled with Iceland. If you're interested in making your own trip to the country, I suggest you start by reading Sean McCormack's article on the Pixiq blog, titled "So you want to go to Iceland." It includes good information on Sean's own trip, which has everything from planning the ideal path to how to do it affordably (which does include camping) and what to take to ensure you'll get great photos. With a little bit of Sean's insight you're sure to have a good and comfortable time while traveling in Iceland. 

http://www.pixiq.com/article/so-you-want-to-go-to-iceland
DPMag
I have long wanted to visit Iceland on a photographic tour. And based on the number of images I've seen from the tiny island in recent years, I'm not nearly the only one. Perhaps it's the almost martian volcanic landscape, the wild horses, or simply the remote oddity of the…

Photos Of Le Tour

I freaking LOVE the Tour de France. Every year I look forward to the opportunity to hunker down and watch as much of it as is possible on American TV. That can be a bit of a challenge since we're not quite as devoted to cycling as Europeans. The other way I get my fix is through pictures—like those in this great gallery compiled by the Atlantic. The images from the Tour really are part of what makes it so great a spectacle: not only is it a three-week long test of human will and physical prowess, but it happens in some of the most picturesque terrain in the world. Watching the colorful peloton breeze through quaint villages, glide over mountain passes, fly through fertile fields... It's unlike anything else in this world. And well worth a look, even if you don't understand all the intricacies of the world's greatest sporting event.

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/07/the-2012-tour-de-france-part-1-of-2/100337/
DPMag
I freaking LOVE the Tour de France. Every year I look forward to the opportunity to hunker down and watch as much of it as is possible on American TV. That can be a bit of a challenge since we're not quite as devoted to cycling as Europeans. The other…

A DSLR Allergy Warning

Here's a new one: an allergy warning about a camera. It seems that a chemical reaction can occur in the rubber handgrips of the Canon EOS 650D (the Rebel T4i) which turns the grips visibly white. That whiteness, it seems, is a chemical known as Zinc bis—which everybody knows can cause allergic reactions. (You knew that, right?) If you find that you have an affected model—which you can check via Canon's web site—well, frankly, you should wash your hands after touching the camera. It seems this only affects a tiny batch of cameras made for just two weeks this spring, but if you find yourself in possession of an affected model—which you test by entering your serial number at the second link below—follow instructions on the site as Canon will be happy to remedy the situation.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/07/10/canon-warns-of-allergen-in-650d-T4i-grip
http://web.canon.jp/imaging/eosd/serial/eosdigital1/x6i-650d-t4i.html
DPMag
Here's a new one: an allergy warning about a camera. It seems that a chemical reaction can occur in the rubber handgrips of the Canon EOS 650D (the Rebel T4i) which turns the grips visibly white. That whiteness, it seems, is a chemical known as Zinc bis—which everybody knows can…

Henri Cartier-Bresson In Just Plain Love

One of the most exciting things about living in our ever-connected, "nothing is ever lost" digital era is the ready availability of tremendous documentary films, from all over the world and about all manner of subjects, via outlets such as YouTube, Netflix and Vimeo. The tremendous Feature Shoot blog recently linked to a perfect example of this, a 2001 French documentary about iconic Magnum photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. The hour-plus subtitled film includes intimate moments with the photographer, as well as in-depth interviews touching on everything from photographic philosophy to technique, and incorporating interviews with other artists in genres from motion pictures to music. Just being able to spend a few moments, virtually, with one of the best photographers of all time... Well, it's invaluable. We're fortunate to live in the era we do.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2012/06/henri-cartier-bresson-just-plain-love-documentary
DPMag
One of the most exciting things about living in our ever-connected, "nothing is ever lost" digital era is the ready availability of tremendous documentary films, from all over the world and about all manner of subjects, via outlets such as YouTube, Netflix and Vimeo. The tremendous Feature Shoot blog recently…

The Making Of The Most Luxurious Camera Ever

Those for whom the $7,000 Leica M-9 digital rangefinder is not luxurious enough are finally in luck. Leica has partnered with elite fashion house Hermes to create a limited edition deluxe version of the camera at the downright discount price of $50,000. (It is a kit, after all.) Not convinced it's worth it? Then take a look at this sumptuously gorgeous video about the making of the Hermes edition of the Leica M9-P. The camera is certainly a work of art, and this video itself also comes darn close. If you didn't appreciate fine craftsmanship before, you definitely will after watching this. 

http://us.leica-camera.com/photography/special_editions/m9_edition_hermes
DPMag
Those for whom the $7,000 Leica M-9 digital rangefinder is not luxurious enough are finally in luck. Leica has partnered with elite fashion house Hermes to create a limited edition deluxe version of the camera at the downright discount price of $50,000. (It is a kit, after all.) Not convinced…

Find Your Lost Or Stolen Camera

Every time you take a picture with a digital camera there's a unique serial number embedded into the EXIF data inside each image file. Along with data about exposure, lens, flash and all sorts of useful information, that serial number can actually come in very handy in case your camera is lost or stolen. How? Because we live in a connected online world, chances are pretty high that photos from digital cameras will eventually be uploaded to the web—via social media, blogs or other connected applications. And that means a smart developer can create a program that allows you to scour the web for your camera's unique serial number should that camera go missing. Thankfully a group of smart developers has come together to create the open source StolenCameraFinder, which makes it easy to find your photos—and eventually your missing camera—with a simple drag and drop interface. Even if you don't know your camera's serial number, all you have to do is drag a photo from that camera onto the StolenCameraFinder home page and it will get to searching by scouring the internet and examining EXIF data of JPEG files to find a matching serial number.

http://www.stolencamerafinder.com
DPMag
Every time you take a picture with a digital camera there's a unique serial number embedded into the EXIF data inside each image file. Along with data about exposure, lens, flash and all sorts of useful information, that serial number can actually come in very handy in case your camera…
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