To D4 Or Not To D4. Is It Even A Question?

The Nikon D4 was announced last week to much fanfare. I have to admit, the flagship D-SLR in the Nikon pro lineup seriously pulled on my irrational "I need to buy this camera" heart-strings. Maybe it's nostalgia for my most beloved camera ever, the perfect tank of film SLR, the F4. Maybe it's that on paper the D4 doesn't reinvent the wheel—which makes me think that the company has created a really good camera that delivers really good pictures. It appears that Nikon has focused on improving usability and picture quality, rather than simply filling the thing with specs that make it look great on paper. But that's really neither here nor there, because there's plenty to read on this site and elsewhere about the new D4. What prompted me to write today was reading The Strobist's take on it. A Nikon guy himself, David Hobby says he won't be buying this great new camera, which is surprising in and of itself. More surprising is that it's because he recently unloaded his arsenal of Nikon equipment and made the switch—not to a Canon D-SLR, but to a medium format digital system. Given the trend of 35mm-film-format D-SLRs getting better by leaps and bounds on an almost yearly basis and rivaling medium format, it's quite a surprising take—made even more surprising since The Strobist is all about using hand-held strobes to take D-SLR photography to the next level. It's a fascinating read, whether or not you agree with David's rationale. But it's one that certainly made me think, and made me extremely envious that I don't have $6,000 or $10,000 to consider investing in new camera equipment at the moment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/01/bailing-on-nikon-d4.html
DPMag
The Nikon D4 was announced last week to much fanfare. I have to admit, the flagship D-SLR in the Nikon pro lineup seriously pulled on my irrational "I need to buy this camera" heart-strings. Maybe it's nostalgia for my most beloved camera ever, the perfect tank of film SLR, the…

The King Of Decay Photography

I recently read about a hobbyist photographer who has turned his passion for exploring run-down places into a stunning photographic portfolio. Henk van Rensbergen is his name, and he's an airline pilot by day, explorer by night. (Well, actually, most of his photography is done by day as well, but those must be his off days.) I'm usually not much of a fan of "ruin porn" as it's become derisively known, but Henk's work is different. First, it's the knowledge that he started his work simply to document the places he enjoyed exploring. His photography stems from a passion, first and foremost, for examining and cataloging these abandoned places. It doesn't seem predatory or exploitative like some urban decay photography. In fact, it's clear that he's paying homage to the places he photographs—and he's doing them wonderful justice. My favorite thing about exploring Henk's web site(s) is to see just how much his photography evolved over the decades he's been making pictures. So first check out his eponymous site at www.henkvanrensbergen.com for his newest work, then head over to www.abandoned-places.com to browse through the back catalog of amazing places he's visited since 1988.

DPMag
I recently read about a hobbyist photographer who has turned his passion for exploring run-down places into a stunning photographic portfolio. Henk van Rensbergen is his name, and he's an airline pilot by day, explorer by night. (Well, actually, most of his photography is done by day as well, but…

Food Landscapes

Do you know Carl Warner? You should, because he's the photographer who combines two of my favorite subjects: food and landscapes. He doesn't shoot sand dunes with bowls of fruit perched on them or anything like that. That would be weird. But what Carl does actually might be weirder. Carl is a still life photographer who photographs food landscapes. In fact, his book is called Food Landscapes and it's just what you think it might be: landscapes comprised of food. From marshmallow clouds to noodle trees, Carl creates amazing sculptural food worlds and then photographs them in his London studio. Read all about it at his web site, where you can also purchase his wonderful book too.

http://www.carlwarner.com

DPMag
Do you know Carl Warner? You should, because he's the photographer who combines two of my favorite subjects: food and landscapes. He doesn't shoot sand dunes with bowls of fruit perched on them or anything like that. That would be weird. But what Carl does actually might be weirder. Carl…

Photographers As Television Stars?

It's not every day you see photographers being interviewed on television. When you do, it's usually the icons of the 20th century who are household names anyway: Leibovitz, Avedon, Cartier-Bresson. But recently a regular photographer—talented, phenomenal, amazing, but still a regular working photographer—got his due on "the second best fake news show" on TV when Jon Stewart interviewed Ben Lowy on The Daily Show. Ben is a photojournalist whose new book, Iraq Perspectives, has received several honors including being selected by iconic William Eggleston to win the Center for Documentary Studies Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. That wasn't why he was interviewed, though. He was assigned to cover The Daily Show for an article in Rolling Stone and the producers were impressed enough to put him in front of their cameras. Check out the interview via The Online Photographer blog, then head over to Ben's web site to learn more about him and see his impressive work.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/12/ben-lowy-on-the-daily-show.html
http://www.benlowy.com

DPMag
It's not every day you see photographers being interviewed on television. When you do, it's usually the icons of the 20th century who are household names anyway: Leibovitz, Avedon, Cartier-Bresson. But recently a regular photographer—talented, phenomenal, amazing, but still a regular working photographer—got his due on "the second best fake…

What Would Ansel Do?

I love bandying about the ultimate unanswerable hypothetical question: If he were alive today, would Ansel Adams have embraced digital photography? Better yet, would he have shot with a digital camera? You can make some great cases for why he would and why he wouldn't. He would, of course, because he was no technophobe and was eager to embrace any scientific advantage he could find to make his images great. And he wouldn't, of course, because the most serious old-school landscape photographers still shoot on large format film. It is, after all, the long established best way to create beautiful, finely detailed high-quality landscape photographs. It's great to ponder the question from a distance, but the opportunity to get actual insight into the question from those who knew the man himself is even better. Alan Ross is a photographer and blogger who worked closely with Ansel for the last ten years of the master's life. Alan recently wrote a blog post with his answer to this hypothetical question. His take surprised me a bit, so I won't spoil it here. Suffice it to say Alan knows a lot more about Ansel than I do, which makes it especially fun to read his answer to the ultimately hypothetical photo question.

http://www.alanrossphotography.com/2011/12/would-ansel-adams-shoot-digital

DPMag
I love bandying about the ultimate unanswerable hypothetical question: If he were alive today, would Ansel Adams have embraced digital photography? Better yet, would he have shot with a digital camera? You can make some great cases for why he would and why he wouldn't. He would, of course, because…

Tintypes Today

Here's a great way to say goodbye to an old year and ring in the new one: let's make 2012 the year of the return of antique photographic processes! Or at least, let's marvel at the dedication of those select few photographers who are not only keeping film alive, but going back far enough in time to keep film's predecessors alive too. Brooklyn photographer Lisa Elmaleh is one such creative genius who's taken to using the tintype technique to create portraits and landscapes with her large format camera. Turning her car into a darkroom, Lisa has made a series of gorgeous portraits of Appalachian musicians, as well as a stunning landscape series in Florida's Everglades. The process, much like the look and feel of the resulting images, is truly timeless. I can't think of a better technique to visualize the last vestiges of vanishing cultures and natural habitats. Visit Lisa's web site at http://lisaelmaleh.com to learn more about the photographer and her wonderful work.

DPMag
Here's a great way to say goodbye to an old year and ring in the new one: let's make 2012 the year of the return of antique photographic processes! Or at least, let's marvel at the dedication of those select few photographers who are not only keeping film alive, but…
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