\

Loosen Up, And Get Portrait Subjects To Do The Same

Here's a great tip for all you portrait photographers out there. No doubt anyone familiar with making portraits on a regular basis is all too familiar with the "Chandler Bing face" that haunts some folks no matter how hard they try. You're not familiar with Chandler Bing Face? It's so named for the character from the TV sitcom friends, because in one episode Chandler Bing—a character on the show—tried unsuccessfully to loosen up and look natural in a portrait. No matter how hard he tried, he couldn't help but make the most uncomfortable face ever seen. Well this is a real issue, whether or not you call it by the same name. Photographer and writer James Maher has provided DPS with not only this funny moniker but also some tips for helping other photographers turn those ugly and uncomfortable portrait expressions into nice, natural looking smiles. I can attest to at least one of them: chatting up your subject is bound to make them feel more at ease, and that will show on their face. Check out these tips and get to shooting without fear of the dreaded Chandler Bing face!

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/how-to-deal-with-the-dreaded-chandler-bing-face
DPMag
Here's a great tip for all you portrait photographers out there. No doubt anyone familiar with making portraits on a regular basis is all too familiar with the "Chandler Bing face" that haunts some folks no matter how hard they try. You're not familiar with Chandler Bing Face? It's so…

Forecasting The Future Of Photography

Guessing what the next generation of cameras will look like is a lot like guessing what the next generation of cars will look like: it's really difficult to differentiate between prototypes that will actually become reality and which will remain mere fantasies. But it's cool to see these technological hypotheses either way. At Nikon's Japanese development headquarters they've created some interesting, and definitely futuristic, camera prototypes which were exhibited earlier this summer at a Science museum in Paris. These devices include two spherical cameras, a very deluxe point-and-shoot, and a D-SLR that looks more like a sci-fi movie prop than a photographic tool. Read all about the possible future of Nikon cameras at the I Am Nikon blog, and check out pictures of these far out cameras. 

http://blog.iamnikon.com/en_GB/photokina/a-vision-of-the-future-of-photography/
DPMag
Guessing what the next generation of cameras will look like is a lot like guessing what the next generation of cars will look like: it's really difficult to differentiate between prototypes that will actually become reality and which will remain mere fantasies. But it's cool to see these technological hypotheses…

Photographing Atop A 1200-foot Tower

Last year I found myself bidding on a commercial photography job that would require repeated visits to a Mississippi River bridge construction site over the course of many months. After receiving my bid the client called to thank me and, almost as an aside, mentioned one other thing. "You'd have to shoot from the top of a 400-foot-tall tower in the middle of the river. Will that be a problem?" Of course being a good businessman I instantly said it was no problem at all and we ended our call. I then proceeded to lay awake in bed for the next three nights, going over in my head what it would be like to photograph from the top of such a tower. Certainly there'd be no elevator. Would there be handrails? Would I be strapped to something? Would I get weak in the knees, or lose my lunch? I've never been so relieved not to get an assignment in my life—my now much longer and happier life, I'm sure. Well photographer Mark Blinch recently found himself on assignment atop an even taller structure, the 1200-foot-tall CN Tower in Toronto. While there he found something else: there's no handrail. Read all about this Reuters photographer's adventure at the Reuters web site. Then thank your lucky stars that you're not up there with him. 

http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/2011/07/27/teetering-on-the-edge
DPMag
Last year I found myself bidding on a commercial photography job that would require repeated visits to a Mississippi River bridge construction site over the course of many months. After receiving my bid the client called to thank me and, almost as an aside, mentioned one other thing. "You'd have…

A Camera-On-Camera Rig That Shoots Photos And Videos Simultaneously

Photographers are being pressed, like so many employees at so many companies, to do more and more with less and less. Americans are actually incredibly productive with our working hours, which is part of the reason companies don't need to hire so many employees any more. For photographers, doing more these days often means shooting video as well. Commercial clients ask for it, and newspapers often expect it as well. With photo staffs being cut around the country, photographers who can deliver photos and video are able to enhance their job security too. The problem with shooting photos and video simultaneously is that it's nearly impossible to do these two things actually simultaneously. Normally the endeavor requires a decision at every given instance, to capture stills or video. The shooter is constantly reassessing and switching between the two. New York Times staff photographer Doug Mills devised an ingenious—albeit hefty—rig that allows him to actually shoot photos and videos simultaneously. Read all about it at the Lens blog, and watch the video of Mr. Mills in action.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/13/shooting-twice-at-once/
DPMag
Photographers are being pressed, like so many employees at so many companies, to do more and more with less and less. Americans are actually incredibly productive with our working hours, which is part of the reason companies don't need to hire so many employees any more. For photographers, doing more…

Fortune Cookie Fortunes

The other day I used a photo to illustrate a story I linked to on this blog. The story was about collecting money from a copyright infringer, so I used a picture of my own to illustrate the story. It was a photo of a fortune cookie fortune with money. That gave me the idea to mention to you here that I have a whole series of those photos I've been working on. I tend to focus more on what other folks are doing around the web, but why not mention what I'm doing every once in a while too? Anyway, ever since I can remember—for 20 years or so—I've saved every fortune cookie fortune I've received. They're stuck to bulletin boards and tucked away in my wallet, filed in desk drawers and scattered around my office. I don't eat that much Chinese food, but the things have really accumulated over the years. One day last year I finally decided to photograph them. After all, they're sort of like little meaningful (or ironic, or funny, or just plain weird) inspirational posters—but personalized with wisdom from Confucius or the guy at the fortune cookie factory. So without further ado, here's a gallery of my fortune cookie photos for your enjoyment, straight from my Etsy store. (If you've got a great fortune you'd like me to photograph, just let me know!)

http://www.etsy.com/shop/chilawas
DPMag
The other day I used a photo to illustrate a story I linked to on this blog. The story was about collecting money from a copyright infringer, so I used a picture of my own to illustrate the story. It was a photo of a fortune cookie fortune with money.…

The Leica Freedom Train

We all know the story of Oskar Schindler, made famous in Steven Spielberg's 1993 movie for saving more than 1000 Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by putting them to work in his factories. It turns out that Ernst Leitz, heir to the founder of the Leica camera company, has a similar legacy. He assigned actual Leica employees, as well as their families, friends and mere acquaintances, to work in Leica facilities around the world—farther from the reach of Adolf Hitler. The Leica plan reached its height in 1938 and 1939. Learn more about Leitz's efforts in the short documentary "Leica Freedom Train," which can be seen on Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKxGbNXt_Is
DPMag
We all know the story of Oskar Schindler, made famous in Steven Spielberg's 1993 movie for saving more than 1000 Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by putting them to work in his factories. It turns out that Ernst Leitz, heir to the founder of the Leica camera company, has a…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.