A Camera So Tasty You Can Eat It

The calendar's quickly turning to a whole new year, but if you act fast you can keep the holiday spirit alive for just a little longer with help from my favorite ridiculous photographic web site Photojojo and its recipe for gingerbread cameras. It's total photo geekery, I know, but I also know I'm not hip enough to deny how great these look. I can make no judgments regarding tastiness, but I guarantee these designs to be in perfectly good taste! Check out the blog post at http://content.photojojo.com/diy/gingerbread-cameras and then get to baking. Feel free to send the leftovers my way, too.  

DPMag
The calendar's quickly turning to a whole new year, but if you act fast you can keep the holiday spirit alive for just a little longer with help from my favorite ridiculous photographic web site Photojojo and its recipe for gingerbread cameras. It's total photo geekery, I know, but I…

The Campaign For Permanent Metadata

Rob Galbraith recently linked to an interesting story about proposed changes to the metadata standards for digital image files. The International Press Telecommunications Council, or IPTC, has started a new campaign whose primary goal is to permanently embed descriptive rights information in digital media, "and to retain it during the whole life cycle." Whereas today many digital image files are stripped of their IPTC and even EXIF metadata—the information that is attached to digital image files that catalogs user-defined (including captions, keywords and copyright info) and camera technical settings, respectively—when they are uploaded to various web resources, and even in other offline situations. The IPTC, however, hopes to prevent that by adopting a standard that would make metadata as permanent a part of digital image files as pixels themselves. It would certainly help minimize cases of orphan works—where a creator of an image cannot be identified—and situations in which metadata is deliberately removed from image files for nefarious purposes. Read about the campaign at http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/content_page.asp?cid=7-11668-12187 and from there check out the Embedded Metadata Manifesto on which the campaign is based. Then consider joining the early discussion that could eventually change the way image information is identified in the digital world. 

DPMag
Rob Galbraith recently linked to an interesting story about proposed changes to the metadata standards for digital image files. The International Press Telecommunications Council, or IPTC, has started a new campaign whose primary goal is to permanently embed descriptive rights information in digital media, "and to retain it during the…

Gerd Ludwig's Chernobyl App

I just finished an article for an upcoming issue of Digital Photo Pro magazine about Gerd Ludwig's 20-year history of photographing in and around the Soviet nuclear disaster site at Chernobyl. Aside from the historic events, part of this particular story is how Gerd, an experienced National Geographic photographer with plenty of years under his belt, is trying to think—and work—like a newbie photographer. He's harnessed the online fundraising site Kickstarter to finance his project, and he's just published an iPad app showcasing the work at Chernobyl. "I'm trying to embrace these new technologies and not just continue to do what I've always done," Gerd told me. "I didn't want to become this inflexible seasoned photographer. I tried to embrace the new media and learn from the younger people that are out there and doing it. It's not just a simple PDF e-book that you flip through; it's fairly comprehensive. It includes 150 images in four chapters, four videos, two panoramic images, some text and even a couple of web sites where people can donate to a children's cause." Gerd's Long Shadow of Chernobyl iPad app is available now for $6.99. For a preview and link directly to the download, visit Gerd's site at www.longshadowofchernobyl.com.

DPMag
I just finished an article for an upcoming issue of Digital Photo Pro magazine about Gerd Ludwig's 20-year history of photographing in and around the Soviet nuclear disaster site at Chernobyl. Aside from the historic events, part of this particular story is how Gerd, an experienced National Geographic photographer with…

Pinterest For Photographers

All the women in my life have been going gaga for a new web site lately, and so I finally joined them to find out what all the fuss is about. And now I see what they love so much. It's a web site called Pinterest, and it's a sort of a fun, crafty, DIY, designy, wonderful combination, as if Etsy and Facebook made a baby, a web site that's part social networking, part visual catalog, part personal notepad. It basically works like this: you find images online that you love and you pin them to your digital wall. Your friends and followers and the public online membership of Pinterest can see your image, like it, and even re-pin your posts. So what's this mean for photographers? Well aside from discovering great recipes and wonderful decorating tips and examples of good design, it's also a phenomenal resource for great photography. The food images are almost universally beautiful and the architectural images are sublime. And there's even a whole Photography section of Pinterest—the perfect place to browse beautiful photographs. I'm a big believer in surrounding yourself with work that inspires you, and Pinterest is a great place to do that. It's a great place to catalog and view phenomenal photography, and by osmosis learn to do it yourself. The only catch is that right now Pinterest is invite-only. Apply online at pinterest.com and you should be online in just a few days. And when you get there, look me up. 

www.pinterest.com

DPMag
All the women in my life have been going gaga for a new web site lately, and so I finally joined them to find out what all the fuss is about. And now I see what they love so much. It's a web site called Pinterest, and it's a sort…

Step Up To Studio Lights

If you're ready to step up from handheld flashes to more powerful and accessory-ready, studio-style strobes… Well then I'd suggest you check out this elegantly written introduction to monolights from the September issue of Digital Photo magazine. And I'm not just saying that because I wrote the article myself. Okay, maybe I am, but still: it really is a great place to start your research if you're thinking about upgrading your strobes. Monolights—which have all their contained within each individual unit (as opposed to contained in an external, central power pack)—offer an affordable, powerful and easy-to-use lighting solution that's perfect for photographers who want to step up to studio-style lighting without breaking the bank. Go ahead: splurge on that last-minute Christmas present, even if it's just for yourself.

http://www.dpmag.com/gear/flash-and-lighting/step-into-studio-lighting.html

DPMag
If you're ready to step up from handheld flashes to more powerful and accessory-ready, studio-style strobes… Well then I'd suggest you check out this elegantly written introduction to monolights from the September issue of Digital Photo magazine. And I'm not just saying that because I wrote the article myself. Okay,…

From Camera To Print… And More!

I've been a photographer for as long as I can remember. I made my first darkroom print in elementary school, and since then I've never been more than a few feet from a camera at any given moment. But as comfortable and confident as I am with almost all technical aspects of photography, there's still one area that makes my knees weak and my lower lip tremble. It's the process of translating my photographs from nice digital images into beautiful prints. There's so much voodoo magic, it seems, in the technical necessities of the file-to-print process that I've prepared myself for the possibility of never fully understanding it. Consequently, my prints suffer. The point of all this is that I'm always on the lookout for information and tutorials that present useful digital printing in a way that I can comprehend—in a way that might actually help me to make better prints, but even more importantly a way that helps me understand how I should go about doing so. That's why I was so pleasantly surprised to discover the wonderful video series from Michael Reichmann and Jeff Schewe of The Luminous Landscape web site. In their series "From camera to print and screen" they've updated the tutorial for 2011, so not only can digital photographers learn to translate image files into beautiful prints, but into image files perfect for iPads and other digital displays. The point is this: for a small investment of time and money I can have the process explained to me in an easy to comprehend way by two exceptional photographers and teachers. I recommend that any photographer interested in expanding his or her printing capabilities invest in this tutorial. I know I will.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/videos/tutorials/camera_to_print_and_screen.shtml

DPMag
I've been a photographer for as long as I can remember. I made my first darkroom print in elementary school, and since then I've never been more than a few feet from a camera at any given moment. But as comfortable and confident as I am with almost all technical…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.