We're Taking More Pictures Than Ever

I came across this tremendous quote the other day, courtesy of the Online Photographer blog. It is simple, yet profound: "10% of all photos ever taken were shot in 2011." Yikes. That's a whole lot of photographs. The quote came from a Fortune magazine article about data. What I think is most interesting, though, is the idea that we really are taking exponentially more pictures now than at any time in our past. What I can't personally reconcile is if that means we value photographs now more than ever before, or if we've officially commoditized them? Either way, it's scary to comprehend just how many of us are taking so many pictures every day. How many will we take in 2012? How many of them will be good? How many of them are simply a waste of time? Is photography getting worse because of this sheer voluminous output, or are we, as photographers, getting better?

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/212/09/quote-.html
DPMag
I came across this tremendous quote the other day, courtesy of the Online Photographer blog. It is simple, yet profound: "10% of all photos ever taken were shot in 2011." Yikes. That's a whole lot of photographs. The quote came from a Fortune magazine article about data. What I think…

Permission To Chimp

Ever heard the word "chimping"? It's the derogatory term for looking at your camera's LCD screen after each exposure. I'm not sure why it's called chimping. Maybe the idea is that even a monkey could take a good picture by looking at the screen after each exposure, and adjusting the camera settings accordingly. But that's the brilliance of chimping as a valuable photographic tool: you can evaluate your settings and change them on the fly in order to improve your photographs. We'd be silly not to take advantage of this invaluable feedback while we shoot. So the next time some old fuddy-duddy makes fun of you for chimping, refer to this blog post by Rob Sheppard and point out to them that just like you use your speedometer to keep track of your driving prowess, so does the LCD screen on the back of your camera offer ideal information for tracking your photographic progress. And there's nothing amateur about that.

http://www.natureandphotography.com/?p=1154/
DPMag
Ever heard the word "chimping"? It's the derogatory term for looking at your camera's LCD screen after each exposure. I'm not sure why it's called chimping. Maybe the idea is that even a monkey could take a good picture by looking at the screen after each exposure, and adjusting the…

100 Photographers You Must Know

There's no quicker way to annoy people en masse than to compile a list of some number of the best of some thing. Whether that's the 100 best Rock 'n Roll albums of all time, or the ten best cars produced this year. Even so, these lists are always fun, fun, fun. And here's a list A Photo Editor pointed to from Professional Photographer, a UK publication, compiling the 100 most influential photographers of all time. Surely designed to incite a little bit of outrage and discussion, that's a good thing. This list is, more than anything, a teaching tool. I'm familiar with the work of most of the photographers on this list, but there are certainly several that cause my mental canvas to draw a blank. The point is, we should all print out this list—whether or not we agree with it—and learn the work of each of these photographers. Study it, in fact, in hopes that some of their genius will subtly rub off on our own aesthetics and into our pictures. If all great artists copy, you could certainly do worse than copying the best of the best. I know I'm going to make it a deliberate goal, starting with the work of #50 on this list, British fashion and documentary photographer Corinne Day, with whom I'm fairly unfamiliar.

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/09/18/100-most-influential-photographers-of-all-time
http://www.corinneday.co.uk/
DPMag
There's no quicker way to annoy people en masse than to compile a list of some number of the best of some thing. Whether that's the 100 best Rock 'n Roll albums of all time, or the ten best cars produced this year. Even so, these lists are always fun,…

A Must-See NPR Picture Show

This is a pretty amazing photographic experience courtesy of NPR. It's the discovery of lost photographs by Charles Cushman, a hobbyist photographer who started photographing in the 1930s and continued shooting for more than 30 years. The bulk of his archive of almost 15,000 images is housed at Indiana University, and these missing photos—found by photo historian Rich Remsberg in boxes destined for the dumpster—had been separated from the larger collection. What's most unique about the images, perhaps, is that they depict America in color in an era we're generally only used to seeing in black & white. The NPR multimedia presentation makes wonderful use of audio narration to tell this tremendous story; it's a wonderful way to use the web to share photographs and tell stories, and I hope we start to see many more presentations like it.

http://www.npr.org/news/specials/2012/cushman
DPMag
This is a pretty amazing photographic experience courtesy of NPR. It's the discovery of lost photographs by Charles Cushman, a hobbyist photographer who started photographing in the 1930s and continued shooting for more than 30 years. The bulk of his archive of almost 15,000 images is housed at Indiana University,…

Frank Lloyd Wright's Photographer

I'm no architecture expert, but I know enough to get me in trouble. And I thought I knew about all of the architectural photographers I should have known, but I was unfortunately unaware of the work of photographer Pedro Guerrero until I learned of his recent passing. It seems that Mr. Guerrero was the unofficial photographer of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. "He told me I should remember he designed his houses from a sitting position," Mr. Guerrero was quoted in The New York Times earlier this year. "He was only three or four inches taller than I was, and he didn't want bird's-eye views or worm's-eye views. He wanted me to photograph a house that he would recognize as being his." After Wright's death, Mr. Guerrero worked extensively with other world-renowned artists and architects such as Alexander Calder and Philip Johnson, and he continued to produce beautiful photographs of art and architecture that are sure to serve as fitting memorials to the artists who made them, as well for the photographer himself. To see more of Mr. Guerrero's work, visit his web site at http://www.guerrerophoto.com, then be sure to read more about his life at the New York Times. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/14/arts/design/pedro-guerrero-95-dies-captured-another-dimension-of-art.html
DPMag
I'm no architecture expert, but I know enough to get me in trouble. And I thought I knew about all of the architectural photographers I should have known, but I was unfortunately unaware of the work of photographer Pedro Guerrero until I learned of his recent passing. It seems that…

The Return Of The Deardorff

I've always wanted a Deardorff large format view camera. They really are beautiful wood and brass works of art that can be put to use to help you make your own beautiful works of photographic art. For the better part of a century, they were the standard bearer for all serious professional photographers--including Ansel, Yousef and Avedon--but the company closed up shop in 1988, leaving purchasers of Deardorff cameras to fight over the remaining cameras that appear on the secondary market. Until now. A new group of owners purchased the company in 2009, gained the rights to the Deardorff trademark in 2010, and now they've started production once again in their Tennessee factory. So if you're in the market for a 4x5 or 8x10 view camera, you no longer have to search eBay and Craigslist in hopes of finding a vintage Deardorff; you can purchase a brand new camera straight from the company itself. 

http://www.pixiq.com/article/the-deardorff-is-back
DPMag
I've always wanted a Deardorff large format view camera. They really are beautiful wood and brass works of art that can be put to use to help you make your own beautiful works of photographic art. For the better part of a century, they were the standard bearer for all…
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