Annie Leibovitz PBS Documentary

The PBS NewsHour recently aired a wonderful little interview with iconic photographer Annie Leibovitz about her most recent project, "Pilgrimage." While she's been known as one of the world's preeminent portrait photographers of the last fewml decades—frankly, = she's priobably the most famous portraitist of that time—her Pilgrimage is not portraits at all. She visited famous locales—Niagara Falls, Abraham Lincoln's boyhood home, Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond—to photograph the artifacts and places that helped to define some of the most important people of the last two centuries. It really is a fascinating project, beautifully executed, and full of beautiful photographs. It's made all the more impressive given that Leibovitz simply has never photographed in this way before. Her photographs are almost universally successful, and in their own way they're still portraits—simply without people present. Fascinating. Check it out at PBS.org.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/entertainment/jan-june12/leibovitz_02-07.html
DPMag
The PBS NewsHour recently aired a wonderful little interview with iconic photographer Annie Leibovitz about her most recent project, "Pilgrimage." While she's been known as one of the world's preeminent portrait photographers of the last fewml decades—frankly, = she's priobably the most famous portraitist of that time—her Pilgrimage is not…

Turn Your iPhone Into A Rangefinder

I'm not convinced that it will ever be practical, much less advantageous, to use adapters and filters to turn cell phone cameras into truly "useful" cameras in the way most photographers define the term. Nevertheless, I'm still happy when people try to make cell phone cameras into something more. And I'm even happier when they do it with real panache. Frequently that means I find great new devices from my favorite fun photo site, photojojo.com. Such was the case today when I learned about the iPhone Rangefinder. Part case, part camera, your iPhone slips into the device availing you to a shutter button, tripod mount, viewfinder and even optional magnetic lenses to create your own "complete phoneography system." I don't know how practical it is as a phone case, or really as a camera, but dang if I wouldn't love snapping iPhone photos with my very own rangefinder. 

http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/iphone-rangefinder/
DPMag
I'm not convinced that it will ever be practical, much less advantageous, to use adapters and filters to turn cell phone cameras into truly "useful" cameras in the way most photographers define the term. Nevertheless, I'm still happy when people try to make cell phone cameras into something more. And…

Shtuff People Say To Photographers

Okay, so I thought I was done with this whole "stuff people say" meme. I even put it to rest last week with a link to a video of funny things photographers say. But then somebody referred me to a video titled, in thankfully safe for work fashion, "Shtuff people say to photographers" and I'm all about it again. If you're a photographer, you no doubt have heard most, if not all, of the things in this video before. What's especially nice is the way it's put together; the main subject sure must be a photographer given how perfectly he nails all the hilarious, aggravating and wonderfully ridiculous things people are always saying to us. So fine, go watch this video, and then we can finally, officially and once-and-for all put this meme away for good. (Unless and until I find another really great one.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=niyTIbiV19A
DPMag
Okay, so I thought I was done with this whole "stuff people say" meme. I even put it to rest last week with a link to a video of funny things photographers say. But then somebody referred me to a video titled, in thankfully safe for work fashion, "Shtuff people…

Beautiful Watches, Beautiful Light

I teach a studio product photography class, and we were just discussing how to photography shiny objects. I explained to the students that unlike flat surfaces, when lighting a reflective surface you don't light the surface itself, you light what it "sees." Treat a shiny surface like a mirror, and you're on your way to total lighting control. One of the students showed me an example of some watches he had photographed. He'd lit the surfaces by pointing his flash straight at them. The resulting hotspots weren't ideal, and I started explaining how a different type of light source would have worked better, I stumble upon this great post at Feature Shoot about photographer Guido Mocafico's series of gorgeously photographed luxury watch movements. Guido has perfectly illustrated this theory, and the resulting images are both simple and beautiful. After taking a look, if you want to learn more… well maybe you just need to sign up for my class.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2012/02/photographs-of-the-inner-workings-of-luxury-watches
DPMag
I teach a studio product photography class, and we were just discussing how to photography shiny objects. I explained to the students that unlike flat surfaces, when lighting a reflective surface you don't light the surface itself, you light what it "sees." Treat a shiny surface like a mirror, and…

Deliberately Blurring Photos

As a photography writer I spend a fairly decent amount of time explaining all of the different ways people can use their equipment to avoid blurry pictures. But if there's one thing I've learned about photography it's that for every "rule" we should follow, there's an equally valid reason to break that very same rule. Take blurry pictures, for instance. While most of the time we want our pictures to be sharp, there are definitely a few occasions in which blurry photos actually work better. Three situations in particular, and thanks to a post on the Light Stalking blog, you can now see what they are and how to harness them. When you want to show motion, when you want to isolate a subject, or when you want to make an abstract image, read about how they work at the Light Stalking blog.  

http://www.lightstalking.com/3-situations-where-blurred-photos-just-work
DPMag
As a photography writer I spend a fairly decent amount of time explaining all of the different ways people can use their equipment to avoid blurry pictures. But if there's one thing I've learned about photography it's that for every "rule" we should follow, there's an equally valid reason to…

Stuff Photographers Say

As quickly as the "Stuff ____ say" meme became interesting, it became blasé. I'm officially over it. (For those blissfully unaware, there's an Internet meme that's reached maximum saturation, and it involves video clips of people in any group—a town, a profession, a stereotype—saying clichés that are particular to their unique town/profession/stereotype.) But I want to share one more example especially of interest to this audience. "Stuff Photographers Say" (where "stuff" is, of course, standing in for a much less genteel word) is a cute take on the things we all say—at least on occasion—for good or bad. You can probably use this video (linked to via Mark Silber's blog) to gauge just how much of a gearhead you are, especially. After this, i think I'm officially done with this "stuff." 

http://www.silberstudios.tv/blog/2012/02/sht-photographers-say/
DPMag
As quickly as the "Stuff ____ say" meme became interesting, it became blasé. I'm officially over it. (For those blissfully unaware, there's an Internet meme that's reached maximum saturation, and it involves video clips of people in any group—a town, a profession, a stereotype—saying clichés that are particular to their…
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