Food Landscapes

Do you know Carl Warner? You should, because he's the photographer who combines two of my favorite subjects: food and landscapes. He doesn't shoot sand dunes with bowls of fruit perched on them or anything like that. That would be weird. But what Carl does actually might be weirder. Carl is a still life photographer who photographs food landscapes. In fact, his book is called Food Landscapes and it's just what you think it might be: landscapes comprised of food. From marshmallow clouds to noodle trees, Carl creates amazing sculptural food worlds and then photographs them in his London studio. Read all about it at his web site, where you can also purchase his wonderful book too.

http://www.carlwarner.com

DPMag
Do you know Carl Warner? You should, because he's the photographer who combines two of my favorite subjects: food and landscapes. He doesn't shoot sand dunes with bowls of fruit perched on them or anything like that. That would be weird. But what Carl does actually might be weirder. Carl…

Photographers As Television Stars?

It's not every day you see photographers being interviewed on television. When you do, it's usually the icons of the 20th century who are household names anyway: Leibovitz, Avedon, Cartier-Bresson. But recently a regular photographer—talented, phenomenal, amazing, but still a regular working photographer—got his due on "the second best fake news show" on TV when Jon Stewart interviewed Ben Lowy on The Daily Show. Ben is a photojournalist whose new book, Iraq Perspectives, has received several honors including being selected by iconic William Eggleston to win the Center for Documentary Studies Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. That wasn't why he was interviewed, though. He was assigned to cover The Daily Show for an article in Rolling Stone and the producers were impressed enough to put him in front of their cameras. Check out the interview via The Online Photographer blog, then head over to Ben's web site to learn more about him and see his impressive work.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/12/ben-lowy-on-the-daily-show.html
http://www.benlowy.com

DPMag
It's not every day you see photographers being interviewed on television. When you do, it's usually the icons of the 20th century who are household names anyway: Leibovitz, Avedon, Cartier-Bresson. But recently a regular photographer—talented, phenomenal, amazing, but still a regular working photographer—got his due on "the second best fake…

What Would Ansel Do?

I love bandying about the ultimate unanswerable hypothetical question: If he were alive today, would Ansel Adams have embraced digital photography? Better yet, would he have shot with a digital camera? You can make some great cases for why he would and why he wouldn't. He would, of course, because he was no technophobe and was eager to embrace any scientific advantage he could find to make his images great. And he wouldn't, of course, because the most serious old-school landscape photographers still shoot on large format film. It is, after all, the long established best way to create beautiful, finely detailed high-quality landscape photographs. It's great to ponder the question from a distance, but the opportunity to get actual insight into the question from those who knew the man himself is even better. Alan Ross is a photographer and blogger who worked closely with Ansel for the last ten years of the master's life. Alan recently wrote a blog post with his answer to this hypothetical question. His take surprised me a bit, so I won't spoil it here. Suffice it to say Alan knows a lot more about Ansel than I do, which makes it especially fun to read his answer to the ultimately hypothetical photo question.

http://www.alanrossphotography.com/2011/12/would-ansel-adams-shoot-digital

DPMag
I love bandying about the ultimate unanswerable hypothetical question: If he were alive today, would Ansel Adams have embraced digital photography? Better yet, would he have shot with a digital camera? You can make some great cases for why he would and why he wouldn't. He would, of course, because…

Tintypes Today

Here's a great way to say goodbye to an old year and ring in the new one: let's make 2012 the year of the return of antique photographic processes! Or at least, let's marvel at the dedication of those select few photographers who are not only keeping film alive, but going back far enough in time to keep film's predecessors alive too. Brooklyn photographer Lisa Elmaleh is one such creative genius who's taken to using the tintype technique to create portraits and landscapes with her large format camera. Turning her car into a darkroom, Lisa has made a series of gorgeous portraits of Appalachian musicians, as well as a stunning landscape series in Florida's Everglades. The process, much like the look and feel of the resulting images, is truly timeless. I can't think of a better technique to visualize the last vestiges of vanishing cultures and natural habitats. Visit Lisa's web site at http://lisaelmaleh.com to learn more about the photographer and her wonderful work.

DPMag
Here's a great way to say goodbye to an old year and ring in the new one: let's make 2012 the year of the return of antique photographic processes! Or at least, let's marvel at the dedication of those select few photographers who are not only keeping film alive, but…

A Camera So Tasty You Can Eat It

The calendar's quickly turning to a whole new year, but if you act fast you can keep the holiday spirit alive for just a little longer with help from my favorite ridiculous photographic web site Photojojo and its recipe for gingerbread cameras. It's total photo geekery, I know, but I also know I'm not hip enough to deny how great these look. I can make no judgments regarding tastiness, but I guarantee these designs to be in perfectly good taste! Check out the blog post at http://content.photojojo.com/diy/gingerbread-cameras and then get to baking. Feel free to send the leftovers my way, too.  

DPMag
The calendar's quickly turning to a whole new year, but if you act fast you can keep the holiday spirit alive for just a little longer with help from my favorite ridiculous photographic web site Photojojo and its recipe for gingerbread cameras. It's total photo geekery, I know, but I…

The Campaign For Permanent Metadata

Rob Galbraith recently linked to an interesting story about proposed changes to the metadata standards for digital image files. The International Press Telecommunications Council, or IPTC, has started a new campaign whose primary goal is to permanently embed descriptive rights information in digital media, "and to retain it during the whole life cycle." Whereas today many digital image files are stripped of their IPTC and even EXIF metadata—the information that is attached to digital image files that catalogs user-defined (including captions, keywords and copyright info) and camera technical settings, respectively—when they are uploaded to various web resources, and even in other offline situations. The IPTC, however, hopes to prevent that by adopting a standard that would make metadata as permanent a part of digital image files as pixels themselves. It would certainly help minimize cases of orphan works—where a creator of an image cannot be identified—and situations in which metadata is deliberately removed from image files for nefarious purposes. Read about the campaign at http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/content_page.asp?cid=7-11668-12187 and from there check out the Embedded Metadata Manifesto on which the campaign is based. Then consider joining the early discussion that could eventually change the way image information is identified in the digital world. 

DPMag
Rob Galbraith recently linked to an interesting story about proposed changes to the metadata standards for digital image files. The International Press Telecommunications Council, or IPTC, has started a new campaign whose primary goal is to permanently embed descriptive rights information in digital media, "and to retain it during the…
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