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Flag Your Camera

Sometimes I write about things because I think you, dear reader, will really want to know about them. And other times I write about things because I am dying to put them to use myself. The latter is the case today. I bring you this great post from David Hobby of Strobist fame, though I found it via one of my favorite blogs, DIY Photography. It's about a fix for lens flare. I love using rim lights and edge lights and back lights to create separation between my subject and the background. But this can present some fairly problematic challenges in terms of lens flare. And anyone who knows me knows that if there's anything I hate it's lens flare. So to prevent lens flare—no matter how you're lighting—you can use a lens shade, and flags, and position lights behind scene elements (trees, walls, people, etc) so that they're flagged from the lens and therefore won't cause flare. Well here's the perfect solution for protecting your lens from flare all around the subject, and it falls into the "duh, why didn't I think of that" category. It's a black cardboard frame that's got a window cut in it, through which you can frame your scene—thus ensuring that your lens is flagged all around, and less likely to be bothered by flare. That's what I call using your brain to solve a big problem in a really simple way. I love it, and I can't wait to try it for myself. I suggest you try it too.

http://www.diyphotography.net/sometimes-its-easier-to-flag-your-camera
Sometimes I write about things because I think you, dear reader, will really want to know about them. And other times I write about things because I am dying to put them to use myself. The latter is the case today. I bring you this great post from David Hobby…

Bill Owens On Suburbia

One of my earliest photo book memories is discovering the sublime black & white photography of Bill Owens and his 1972 book "Suburbia." It revolutionized the way I thought about photography—that someone could so painstakingly document mundane suburban life, the life that I came from, was mind-blowing. Photography need not take place in exotic locations across the globe. Everything, when looked at critically and considered with a photographer's eye, is fodder for outstanding photographs—that's what this book taught me. If you haven't seen "Suburbia" for yourself, I highly recommend that you seek out a copy. In the meantime, visit this interview with photographer Bill Owens via the American Suburb X web site. Conducted in 2005, it provides 30 years worth of perspective on the fairly groundbreaking work, including how Mr. Owens is still photographing contemporary of suburbia to this day.

http://www.americansuburbx.com/2012/04/theory-interview-bill-owens.html
One of my earliest photo book memories is discovering the sublime black & white photography of Bill Owens and his 1972 book "Suburbia." It revolutionized the way I thought about photography—that someone could so painstakingly document mundane suburban life, the life that I came from, was mind-blowing. Photography need not…

Happy Birthday, Hubble

It's hard to believe the Hubble Space Telescope is already 22 years old. It seems like just yesterday it was sent out there into the great unknown. I guess that's the first sign that you're getting old: when things that happened two decades ago seem like they were just yesterday. The good news, though, is that Hubble has 22 years of amazing photographs under its belt, and courtesy of this post at Brain Pickings you can see a few of my personal favorites. Have you ever glimpsed anything as stunning as the towering gases of the Carina Nebula? You wouldn't have, if NASA hadn't funded this deep space explorer back when I was young. It's outlived the shuttle program, and it's soon to be replaced by a newer, presumably even better deep space telescope, but it's hard to argue with the images this machine has delivered to humanity—glimpses of the cosmos that we would never have begun to understand otherwise. A pretty remarkable feat for photography, I would say. Celebrate two decades of Hubble imagery with the new National Geographic monograph filled with stunning photographs and scientific explanations that make the jaw-dropping images even more remarkable.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/04/24/happy-birthday-hubble/
It's hard to believe the Hubble Space Telescope is already 22 years old. It seems like just yesterday it was sent out there into the great unknown. I guess that's the first sign that you're getting old: when things that happened two decades ago seem like they were just yesterday.…

Learn To Light People By First Lighting An Egg

I believe that light is the most important element in any photograph. Some of you, no doubt, are saying "duh," while others are thinking it's not as important as the camera or the lens, the subject or the moment. These other elements are obviously important, but I believe it's the light that we should all be most concerned about. After all, light is the reason for the "photo" in the word "photograph." So, the point is this: anything you can do to improve your understanding of lighting, and skill with utilizing the appropriate light to render your subject exactly as you want, will be a huge benefit in all of your photographs no matter what you shoot. To that end, I recommend you head over to DIYPhotography.net to check out this great little video by Joe Edelman, who uses a simple old egg to demonstrate the basics of great portrait lighting. It's super simple, but that also makes it super effective. Plus, it's neat to see how different lighting scenarios can have such a huge effect on the same subject—even if it's just a little old egg.

http://www.diyphotography.net/understanding-lighting-with-an-egg.
I believe that light is the most important element in any photograph. Some of you, no doubt, are saying "duh," while others are thinking it's not as important as the camera or the lens, the subject or the moment. These other elements are obviously important, but I believe it's the…

RAW Capture From Your Phone?

There are a lot of smart people in the world. They figure out how to do things that would never even occur to me. Things like accessing the uncompressed image data from your iPhone's camera and saving it as a TIFF. This is brilliant—and something I never thought of, and now I can't imagine shooting phone photos without it. What's most exciting about this breakthrough—as explained in the great DP Review's explanation of the new "645 Pro" app—is what it foreshadows: the potential eventuality of RAW image capture from the camera built into your smart phone. It only makes sense. After all, if phones now have more megapixels than most D-SLRs from just a few years back… Well, if you're going to use your camera to take pictures—and the statistics say you most definitely will—then you might as well make them as great as possible. Check out the app, and then keep those fingers crossed that RAW capabilities aren't too far behind. And don't mistake my enthusiasm for a better quality phone picture for an endorsement to leave your real cameras at home. I'm just excited to see technological advancements in the cameras we carry with us everywhere.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/04/20/645-PRo-offers-camera-control-and-uncompressed-output.
There are a lot of smart people in the world. They figure out how to do things that would never even occur to me. Things like accessing the uncompressed image data from your iPhone's camera and saving it as a TIFF. This is brilliant—and something I never thought of, and…

American Landscape Photography Contest

Our sister publication, the ever inspiring Outdoor Photographer, is hosting a unique photography contest. It's the American Landscape Photo Contest. Can you guess what the entries should consist of? That's right: your best images of the American landscape. What makes this contest unique for us is that it’s a fairly serious affair, with a judging panel that includes OP editor Christopher Robinson and master landscape photographers Jack Dykinga and Dewitt Jones, and a grand prize that includes not only a few thousand dollars worth of prizes (Canon, Nikon or Sony D-SLR included) but it also offers the opportunity to have your photographs featured in a multi-page spread in an upcoming issue of Outdoor Photographer magazine. That's pretty cool. Check out a few early favorites, and look for the link to enter at http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/photo-contests/the-american-landscape-2012/great-shots.html.
Our sister publication, the ever inspiring Outdoor Photographer, is hosting a unique photography contest. It's the American Landscape Photo Contest. Can you guess what the entries should consist of? That's right: your best images of the American landscape. What makes this contest unique for us is that it’s a fairly…
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