Have A Nice Book

Have you seen the site called Have a Nice Book? It's all about photo books. And since this week has been devoted to a few photo books I've been keen to get my hands on, I thought it might be nice to mention this site too. I know it's not technically a photo book—but it's seriously the next best thing. And it really does put photo books on a pedestal. You see, the Have a Nice Book folks get their hands on great photo books, and then they make videos of them. They browse through the books, providing you with a great glimpse at the art therein, which is not only interesting but practical—it gives you a better idea of whether or not a book might be perfect for you to purchase. Think of it like a service that allows you to preview hot new photo books, as well as one that introduces you to beautiful books by artists you may not be familiar with. More than anything, it's all very nicely done to boot. Take a look and just try to tell me the photo book isn't thriving in this new digital world. The site represents a great combination of the old print technology merged with digital video and the Internet. I, for one, absolutely love it.

http://www.haveanicebook.com/blog
DPMag
Have you seen the site called Have a Nice Book? It's all about photo books. And since this week has been devoted to a few photo books I've been keen to get my hands on, I thought it might be nice to mention this site too. I know it's not…

Guide To Selling Your Photos As Fine Art

Today's book looks like a pretty great book about photography, yet it's got no photos. It's "Photographs Not Taken," a book of essays rather than photographs. Written by photographers, it's all about the personal stories of missed opportunities and the mistakes that led to them, by such prominent photographers as Mary Ellen Mark, Tim Hetherington, Roger Ballen and Sylvia Plachy. This book seems destined to become a must-read for every photographer and photography collector, and it's a brilliant idea to boot. Who would've thought a book about photography could be so well served by not including any photos? Learn more via the New York Times Lens blog.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/28/a-picture-book-without-pictures
DPMag
Today's book looks like a pretty great book about photography, yet it's got no photos. It's "Photographs Not Taken," a book of essays rather than photographs. Written by photographers, it's all about the personal stories of missed opportunities and the mistakes that led to them, by such prominent photographers as…

Pictures Not Taken

Today's book looks like a pretty great book about photography, yet it's got no photos. It's "Photographs Not Taken," a book of essays rather than photographs. Written by photographers, it's all about the personal stories of missed opportunities and the mistakes that led to them, by such prominent photographers as Mary Ellen Mark, Tim Hetherington, Roger Ballen and Sylvia Plachy. This book seems destined to become a must-read for every photographer and photography collector, and it's a brilliant idea to boot. Who would've thought a book about photography could be so well served by not including any photos? Learn more via the New York Times Lens blog.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/28/a-picture-book-without-pictures
DPMag
Today's book looks like a pretty great book about photography, yet it's got no photos. It's "Photographs Not Taken," a book of essays rather than photographs. Written by photographers, it's all about the personal stories of missed opportunities and the mistakes that led to them, by such prominent photographers as…

Vision And Voice

I mentioned yesterday that there have been quite a few books cross my radar lately that have piqued my interest. David DuChemin's "Vision and Voice" is at the top of that list, as it appears to touch on one of my favorite areas of image-making technique: the mental side of things. Though it's not Tuck's newest, this book is really intriguing to me as it's a technical manual of a different sort, serving the idea that technique without content is a surefire recipe for lifeless art. And if you don't think of your photographs as art… Well, that might be the first problem. For photographers who are interested in learning about how to develop a creative vision and refine their inward approach to making photographs rather than focusing on the buttons and dials that most how-to books are based on. Here's a link to a nice in-depth look at the book from DPReview, followed by a link to DuChemin's web site listing of all of his published works.

http://digital-photography-school.com/vision-and-voice-by-david-duchemin-book-review
http://www.pixelatedimage.com/blog/davids-books/
DPMag
I mentioned yesterday that there have been quite a few books cross my radar lately that have piqued my interest. David DuChemin's "Vision and Voice" is at the top of that list, as it appears to touch on one of my favorite areas of image-making technique: the mental side of…

LED Lighting Instruction

I'm going to focus on great photo books I'd like to buy this week. And I'll start with one that's very specific: It's all about LED lighting. While I do not yet own a single LED light, I'm definitely intrigued by the technology. They're smaller, lighter, brighter, cooler, and much less of an energy drain that strobes, tungsten hot lights or just about any other light source you can think of. They're used wherever photographers and videographers want to minimize heat and the footprint of the light, while still outputting a beautiful light that can be fairly specular or pretty darn soft. Before I go investing in some LED lights myself—and trust me, they can definitely be an investment—I think I'll check out Kirk Tuck's new LED Lighting book. Packed with information from shopping for the right light for yourself and then putting it to good use, Tuck's book is written from the perspective of a photographer who, after dabbling with LED lights, essentially abandoned studio strobes in favor of lower power continuous light sources. No matter what you shoot, consider investigating LED lights, and if you're at all serious about going back and forth between stills and video, LED might be exactly what you need. I know I'm going to use it to help make my first foray into working with the technology.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2012/04/led-lighting-for-photography-kirk-tuck.html
DPMag
I'm going to focus on great photo books I'd like to buy this week. And I'll start with one that's very specific: It's all about LED lighting. While I do not yet own a single LED light, I'm definitely intrigued by the technology. They're smaller, lighter, brighter, cooler, and much…

Intro To Focus Stacking

I have never stacked focus. Have you? Do you know what focus stacking is? It's the technique in which you take multiple exposures, with multiple points of focus, and combine them together in the computer (into a "stack") and choose only the sharpest bits from each shot to create an overall sharper image with greater depth of field than what would have been possible with the single in-camera image alone. This is most useful, as you might imagine, with very shallow depth of field. And that makes it the most obvious fix for macro photos in which not quite every bit of your tiny subject is tack sharp. You can fix that with focus stacking. Mike Panic writes about the technique on the Light Stalking blog, and he demonstrates how you too can get sharp macro images of an entire subject, rather than settling for just one part being perfectly in focus. The article includes a great example too, as manifested on a bug's millions of eyes photographed by Thomas Shahan.

http://www.lightstalking.com/focus-stacking-in-photoshop
DPMag
I have never stacked focus. Have you? Do you know what focus stacking is? It's the technique in which you take multiple exposures, with multiple points of focus, and combine them together in the computer (into a "stack") and choose only the sharpest bits from each shot to create an…
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