Nikon Lens Selector

I feel like I may have mentioned this in the past, but it's neat enough that I'd say it's worth coming back to. Scott Kelby just reminded me about this useful tool: a lens focal length simulator from Nikon, which can become an invaluable tool when selecting your next lens—or even camera body. Better yet, it can become an informative tool to help learn about the effects of different focal lengths and sensor sizes. With the tool, simply input all the particulars of lens and focal lengths, and you can even look at the type of photograph you'll be making, and then the simulator will display how a given scene will look on a particular sensor, with a particular focal length lens at a particular distance. It's simple but super-effective, and a great way to help plan your next lens purchase (or, like I said, to learn a little more about how focal length and sensor size affect images). Check out the simulator at  http://www.nikonusa.com/en_US/IMG/Images/Micro-Sites/Lens-Simulator/simulator.htm
DPMag
I feel like I may have mentioned this in the past, but it's neat enough that I'd say it's worth coming back to. Scott Kelby just reminded me about this useful tool: a lens focal length simulator from Nikon, which can become an invaluable tool when selecting your next lens—or…

Preserve Your Favorite Films

Store your film forever! Well, maybe not forever, but at least for a long, long time. Storing film is becoming a very real necessity for photographers who enjoy shooting with the tangible stuff. As more and more films disappear from production and, eventually, the photo marketplace... well, if you have a favorite film, you'll need to stockpile it if you'd care to shoot it a few years into the future. And you'll want your stock to last. With this article from Photojojo, you can gain some insights into storing your film most effectively. Open it, label it and cool it in the fridge: there's not too much to the secret for successfully storing film, but it definitely does take a plan. The article will help you develop an approach and implement it, so that if your favorite film disappears from the marketplace you won't be stranded without it forever. (The only thing I disagree with in this article? You don't need a label maker! A little tape and a marker will serve you just fine.)

http://content.photojojo.com/tutorials/how-to-store-film
DPMag
Store your film forever! Well, maybe not forever, but at least for a long, long time. Storing film is becoming a very real necessity for photographers who enjoy shooting with the tangible stuff. As more and more films disappear from production and, eventually, the photo marketplace... well, if you have…

Resolution Revisited

Resolution is no fun. It took me years of coursework and studying and trial and error before I finally felt comfortable with resolution. (That was, of course, prior to the internet era where an explanation of everything is only a click away.) Resolution is such a huge topic, it deserves its own magazine and workshop series and maybe even a TV show. But of course, resolution is not a lot of fun… so, alas, it will never get what it deserves. Instead we need to find little glimpses of insight online via stories like this one at the Light Stalking blog. It's a rough guide to resolution, courtesy of Jason Row, and it's an easy-to-understand explanation of image resolution from megapixels to image size. It'll help you answer the ever important "what exactly is high resolution" question, and it will give you the confidence that comes from understanding this straightforward but very important (and somewhat nuanced) photographic essential. 

http://www.lightstalking.com/a-rough-guide-to-image-resolution
DPMag
Resolution is no fun. It took me years of coursework and studying and trial and error before I finally felt comfortable with resolution. (That was, of course, prior to the internet era where an explanation of everything is only a click away.) Resolution is such a huge topic, it deserves…

Neat New LED Light Source

Have you seen the ICE Light? It's been the subject of a bit of buzz, and I personally know at least a few photographers who are clamoring for the thing. It's a handheld, battery-powered, daylight balanced light source for photography and video uses. It was invented by Jerry Ghionis, who partnered with Westcott to produce the neat new lights. The handheld lights look almost like, well, a light saber. Though it's called the ICE Light, it's not because LEDs keep the thing pretty darn cool, in more ways than one. It does look sort of like an icicle too, but that's still not where the name comes from. You'll have to check out Ghionis's ICE Society for more information on the name, but to get your hands on this cool little light, well you won't have to wait much longer. When I say it's new, I mean it's brand new: the ICE Light is only starting to ship as we speak. If you've got $500 to spend on a really cool (pun intended) light, check it out.

http://www.theicelight.com
DPMag
Have you seen the ICE Light? It's been the subject of a bit of buzz, and I personally know at least a few photographers who are clamoring for the thing. It's a handheld, battery-powered, daylight balanced light source for photography and video uses. It was invented by Jerry Ghionis, who…

The Beauty Of Rotting Food

Here are some gorgeous photographs of totally disgusting subject matter. It's Klaus Pichler's "One Third" photographic project, in which he photographs food in advanced—and I mean really advanced—stages of decay. As NPR said, "it's a feast for the eyes, even if it turns the stomach." The project, and its name, comes from the fact that Pichler wanted to bring attention to how much food we waste in the western world—almost a third of all food purchased. So he went to the grocery store and bought milk and cheese and various other items and proceeded to let them rot. Then he constructed polished advertising-style studio sessions with the disgusting results. The images present a great dichotomy: disgusting yet beautiful. And they definitely get the job done by making you think about waste in the your own person food stream.
Photo by Klaus Pichler.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/04/14/150494837/revealing-the-revolting-beauty-of-food-waste
DPMag
Here are some gorgeous photographs of totally disgusting subject matter. It's Klaus Pichler's "One Third" photographic project, in which he photographs food in advanced—and I mean really advanced—stages of decay. As NPR said, "it's a feast for the eyes, even if it turns the stomach." The project, and its name,…

How To Light A Lamborghini

When I was a kid I had a prized poster on my wall: a black-on-black 1984 Lamborghini Countach. It was a gorgeous car, and a gorgeous photo. But not nearly as jaw-dropping, on either count, as Blair Bunting's new photograph of a 2012 Lamborghini Aventador. Blair may be best known as the photographer of athletes and awesome reality TV shows with the gritty realist style, but he also photographs cars. And when he was asked to shoot a Lamborghini so that the folks at F-stoppers could make a video of it, Blair jumped at the chance. He breaks down the how and the why on his blog, and you can also watch the finished video there too. It's a great behind-the-scenes with a talented young photographer shooting a gorgeous dream car. And I think it's neat to see how simple it is to photograph such an exotic subject—as long as you've got the right light.

http://www.blairbunting.com/blog/?p=2509
DPMag
When I was a kid I had a prized poster on my wall: a black-on-black 1984 Lamborghini Countach. It was a gorgeous car, and a gorgeous photo. But not nearly as jaw-dropping, on either count, as Blair Bunting's new photograph of a 2012 Lamborghini Aventador. Blair may be best known…
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