\

Adventure Portraiture

I recently had the good fortune of attending a lecture by forward-thinking photographer Jay Kinghorn. Along with a good bit of wisdom about the photo business, Jay also told me about a friend of his who's a very talented photographer. Claudia Lopez is her name and she's a phenomenal mountaineering and travel photographer. "She has a unique style in the way she tones her images," Jay said, "and she specializes in taking portraits of climbers and mountaineers in their environment." Her portfolio looks unlike any other—namely because most portrait photographers don't climb 8,000-foot peaks to make their portraits, and most mountaineering photographers don't have quite such a deft touch when it comes to photographing people. What I appreciate most about it is the context: she really paints a picture of what life is like for the people who make these amazing mountaineering expeditions. See for yourself at her site, claudialopezphotography.com.

http://www.claudialopezphotography.com

DPMag
I recently had the good fortune of attending a lecture by forward-thinking photographer Jay Kinghorn. Along with a good bit of wisdom about the photo business, Jay also told me about a friend of his who's a very talented photographer. Claudia Lopez is her name and she's a phenomenal mountaineering…

A stunning Digital Composite

Ever wonder what you'd look like if you could average your face over a period of almost two years? Sort of a weird thought, I know, but by compositing together 500 images from the self-portrait-every-day project of Flickr user "clickflashwhirr," digital artist and designer Tiemen Rapati has figured it out. He determined the average tonal value of every given pixel within the frame (exactly how, I'm not sure—but that's his prerogative) and arrived at an "average" portrait—which also happens to be a beautiful photograph. It makes sense, too, as the details that change least from day to day (eyes, nose, mouth) are rendered sharpest in the image, while parts at the periphery (clothes, hair, accessories and background) all fade into a shapeless blur. The result is a nifty bit of computer-aided image-making, and one heck of a stunning portrait. Check it out at the Colossal blog and find out more via Mr. Rapati's own Flickr page.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2011/11/composite-photograph-made-from-500-self-portrait
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rapatski/5742643409

DPMag
Ever wonder what you'd look like if you could average your face over a period of almost two years? Sort of a weird thought, I know, but by compositing together 500 images from the self-portrait-every-day project of Flickr user "clickflashwhirr," digital artist and designer Tiemen Rapati has figured it out.…

With Child

It's that time of year when I start to think about holiday gifts. I love to give books, and I especially love photo books. So over the coming weeks I'll point out some of my favorite new books to put on your list this year. The first comes from a photographer who I've had the good fortune of interviewing a few times. It's Howard Schatz, and I'm consistently struck by not only the quality of his work, but the huge quantity and variety. He regularly publishes books as his preferred creative outlet: one may focus on athletes in action, while the next concentrates on underwater portraiture, followed by a collection of abstract body art. That's just how Mr. Schatz expresses himself: he has an idea and he goes for it. His most recent book is the product of another great idea and more than 20 years of work photographing pregnant women as a celebration of their bodies and their babies. "With Child" is Schatz's 18th book and will be released this month. It's the perfect gift for new moms and grandmothers, for those who may be expecting and for those who simply appreciate fine black & white photography of the human form.

http://www.howardschatz.com/books.php?galleryID=50
DPMag
It's that time of year when I start to think about holiday gifts. I love to give books, and I especially love photo books. So over the coming weeks I'll point out some of my favorite new books to put on your list this year. The first comes from a…

Large Scale Light Painting

I'm infatuated with light painting. It's a technique that I don't often attempt myself, but I sure am drawn to the results. That's probably why this collection of images by Eric Curry—a photographer who uses light to paint on a grand scale, with subjects like classic military aircraft, Airstream trailers and other huge and iconic American machines—and his behind the scenes "making of" videos, really caught my eye. The DIY Photography blog brought his work to my attention, and that's where I recommend you go to watch him work. It's amazing. From there, visit Eric's web site for a more in depth look at the images in his American Pride and Passion project.

http://www.diyphotography.net/light-painting-a-b-25-bomber
http://americanprideandpassion.com/photographs.php

DPMag
I'm infatuated with light painting. It's a technique that I don't often attempt myself, but I sure am drawn to the results. That's probably why this collection of images by Eric Curry—a photographer who uses light to paint on a grand scale, with subjects like classic military aircraft, Airstream trailers…

Traveling With An 8x10 View Camera

I know not many of us are shooting with a 70-year-old wooden view cameras, but I thought this story was too good not to share. While the rest of us are toting around our little D-SLRs and even littler compact cameras, master photographer Douglas Kirkland still uses his Deardorff 8x10 on a fairly regular basis. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Mr. Kirkland about his camera (he mentioned that he started as a product photographer in Buffalo, NY and even used a Deardorff 8x10 when he assisted Irving Penn) and I thought his story about traveling with the camera was interesting. About to board a flight to Australia, Mr. Kirkland told me about the peculiarities of the camera and its film. "We usually carry it with us," Mr. Kirkland said when I asked him if he checked the camera with luggage. "It's very light because it's made of wood. It's like a very old person; you've got to treat them delicately. The trick these days is the film. We'll FedEx our film because they don't zap it, and then I'm going to have some sheets processed over there just to verify it hasn't been hit by x-rays, and in this case I'll process the film there in Sydney. We have worked in Australia on other occasions with that camera, and believe it or not they have enough sophistication at the airport that if you call them in advance and go there with a changing bag, they will put their hands in the changing bag and feel that it's film and not put it through the x-ray. These are new considerations when using a view camera when you're traveling." If you don't mind the bit of extra effort, maybe you should consider purchasing your own Deardorff 8x10. Then study the work of Mr. Kirkland; he's an ideal photographer to emulate, especially when it comes to that camera.

http://deardorffcameras.com

DPMag
I know not many of us are shooting with a 70-year-old wooden view cameras, but I thought this story was too good not to share. While the rest of us are toting around our little D-SLRs and even littler compact cameras, master photographer Douglas Kirkland still uses his Deardorff 8x10…

Best Environmental Photos Of The Year

There are still a couple of months left before we put 2011 to bed, but the London-based Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management has gone ahead and named its best environmental photos of the year. This collection of stunning, heart-wrenching, beautiful images was shot by photographers from around the world—including professionals and hobbyists alike—with more than 10,000 submissions from 105 countries. The National Geographic web site features a gallery of the winners, and it's well worth a look. While you're there, click over to another great gallery of "best of" photos: the winners of the Veolia Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/10/pictures/111027-best-nature-pictures-2011-environment-animals-science#
Photograph by Bence Máté
DPMag
There are still a couple of months left before we put 2011 to bed, but the London-based Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management has gone ahead and named its best environmental photos of the year. This collection of stunning, heart-wrenching, beautiful images was shot by photographers from around the…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.