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Adobe Creative Cloud

Along with the newest version of Photoshop, CS6, that Adobe recently announced, it also introduced us to a new service known as the Adobe Creative Cloud. For a monthly subscription fee you can have unlimited access not only to Photoshop, but to Premiere and Dreamweaver and 23 other fully functional Adobe Creative Suite products. And these programs aren't accessed from some server online: they're fully functional programs that you download to your computer, just like users who pay a one-time licensing fee do. So for anyone who thinks of the high price of Photoshop as a preventative reason for not installing the industry standard software (especially if you're unsure whether you'll really take to the program itself) now you can try it out on a month-to-month basis and avoid the big one-time payment. And for those who always want to upgrade but don't love the cost, this approach could make sense for you too. Best of all, rather than waiting for new features to be released in new versions of the software, The Creative Cloud will allow Adobe to implement new features via updates, affording you early access to the best new bits of programming. It's a brilliant idea, and one that I'm sure is going to bring Photoshop to an even wider audience of photographers. Add to it features like extra cloud storage, syncing and collaboration and Adobe Creative Cloud becomes a really intriguing option. Check out what Photoshop guru Scott Kelby thinks of the program after he got hands on demo straight from the folks from Adobe.

http://scottkelby.com/2012/my-adobe-creative-cloud-quick-qa/
DPMag
Along with the newest version of Photoshop, CS6, that Adobe recently announced, it also introduced us to a new service known as the Adobe Creative Cloud. For a monthly subscription fee you can have unlimited access not only to Photoshop, but to Premiere and Dreamweaver and 23 other fully functional…

Proposed Changes To The Cost Of Copyright

As a professional photographer, copyright is an extremely important topic to me. And it should be important to you, too—as well as for every photographer, artist and musician. Which is why it's a bit concerning that the US Copyright Office has proposed to increase the fees for registering photographic works from $35 to $65. You don't need to be a math whiz to see that it's almost double the cost. Many consider the process expensive enough already, which makes it somewhat preventative if you're on a real budget, but almost doubling the cost is definitely going to keep a lot of photographers from registering their works. This is why the Advertising Photographers of America have raised some red flags about the proposed change, and they're asking photographers who have a stake in the game to let their voices be heard at the Copyright Office via an online form. Take a look at the proposed revisions via the A Photo Editor site, and then if you feel strongly that the cost to register your photographs should not increase, let the Copyright Office know why.

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/04/30/new-fees-proposed-for-copyright-registration/
DPMag
As a professional photographer, copyright is an extremely important topic to me. And it should be important to you, too—as well as for every photographer, artist and musician. Which is why it's a bit concerning that the US Copyright Office has proposed to increase the fees for registering photographic works…

Find Your Favorite Feature Of Photoshop CS6

Adobe announced its newest version of Photoshop a couple of weeks ago, and it didn't take long for the photoblogosphere to respond with a veritable treasure-trove of how-to videos explaining awesome new features and techniques made possible by the software. So here I present to you a one-stop shop for almost two dozen videos of cool new features in Photoshop CS6, courtesy of the fine folks at DPS. Head over there for an in-depth look at the new software, and you can formulate what constitutes your favorite features of CS6 for yourself.

http://digital-photography-school.com/23-cool-new-features-in-adobe-photoshop-cs6
Adobe announced its newest version of Photoshop a couple of weeks ago, and it didn't take long for the photoblogosphere to respond with a veritable treasure-trove of how-to videos explaining awesome new features and techniques made possible by the software. So here I present to you a one-stop shop for…

Photos Of The Titanic, From The Titanic

I've had a busy month, so please forgive me for failing to mention the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. I'd made note of it, of course, because I had stumbled across this fabulous collection of photographs of the doomed ship and wanted to be sure to point them out to you. (While I'm at it, Mike Johnston of the Online Photographer blog linked to a tremendous account of the sinking of the Titanic, written by someone who had been on the boat. It was phenomenal, and explained the experience of the sinking of the ship to me in a way no big budget movie or even photographic account ever quite has. It's worth a look; head over to Mike's site to search it out.) Time Magazine's Lightbox blog features photographs by amateur photographer Father Francis Browne, who sailed on the Titanic's maiden voyage from the Southampton to its first stop in Ireland. There he was called back to his station, so Browne disembarked, which ultimately saved his life. He thankfully brought with him a collection of photographs he'd made on board the ship in its first days at sea, and they remain the only images from the Titanic itself that have survived. Today they offer a tremendous glimpse into this mysterious bit of history, and a fitting way to commemorate the centennial of the great American tragedy.

http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#1
I've had a busy month, so please forgive me for failing to mention the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. I'd made note of it, of course, because I had stumbled across this fabulous collection of photographs of the doomed ship and wanted to be sure to point…

Flag Your Camera

Sometimes I write about things because I think you, dear reader, will really want to know about them. And other times I write about things because I am dying to put them to use myself. The latter is the case today. I bring you this great post from David Hobby of Strobist fame, though I found it via one of my favorite blogs, DIY Photography. It's about a fix for lens flare. I love using rim lights and edge lights and back lights to create separation between my subject and the background. But this can present some fairly problematic challenges in terms of lens flare. And anyone who knows me knows that if there's anything I hate it's lens flare. So to prevent lens flare—no matter how you're lighting—you can use a lens shade, and flags, and position lights behind scene elements (trees, walls, people, etc) so that they're flagged from the lens and therefore won't cause flare. Well here's the perfect solution for protecting your lens from flare all around the subject, and it falls into the "duh, why didn't I think of that" category. It's a black cardboard frame that's got a window cut in it, through which you can frame your scene—thus ensuring that your lens is flagged all around, and less likely to be bothered by flare. That's what I call using your brain to solve a big problem in a really simple way. I love it, and I can't wait to try it for myself. I suggest you try it too.

http://www.diyphotography.net/sometimes-its-easier-to-flag-your-camera
Sometimes I write about things because I think you, dear reader, will really want to know about them. And other times I write about things because I am dying to put them to use myself. The latter is the case today. I bring you this great post from David Hobby…

Bill Owens On Suburbia

One of my earliest photo book memories is discovering the sublime black & white photography of Bill Owens and his 1972 book "Suburbia." It revolutionized the way I thought about photography—that someone could so painstakingly document mundane suburban life, the life that I came from, was mind-blowing. Photography need not take place in exotic locations across the globe. Everything, when looked at critically and considered with a photographer's eye, is fodder for outstanding photographs—that's what this book taught me. If you haven't seen "Suburbia" for yourself, I highly recommend that you seek out a copy. In the meantime, visit this interview with photographer Bill Owens via the American Suburb X web site. Conducted in 2005, it provides 30 years worth of perspective on the fairly groundbreaking work, including how Mr. Owens is still photographing contemporary of suburbia to this day.

http://www.americansuburbx.com/2012/04/theory-interview-bill-owens.html
One of my earliest photo book memories is discovering the sublime black & white photography of Bill Owens and his 1972 book "Suburbia." It revolutionized the way I thought about photography—that someone could so painstakingly document mundane suburban life, the life that I came from, was mind-blowing. Photography need not…
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