A Must-Have For Every Camera Bag

Carry a trash bag. There, I blew all the mystery about this post right there in the first paragraph. Steve Berardi, the PhotoNaturalist, thinks there's one item everyone who ever sets foot in the out of doors with a camera in hand should be carrying inside their camera bag. It's a simple trash bag, which has a million uses. Most notably, it's the perfect protector in case it starts to rain. But it's also handy to become a makeshift light diffuser for a macro photograph, and it can even become a bit of a softbox for a flash if you're in a pinch—something I've written about on this very web site. Check out PhotoNaturalist to get the scoop straight from the horse's mouth, and then be sure to peruse the plentiful reader comments for a bunch of other great reasons why you should carry this must-have accessory. And in the meantime, just trust me and stuff a trash bag inside your camera bag. 

http://photonaturalist.net/something-that-should-be-in-every-camera-bag.
DPMag
Carry a trash bag. There, I blew all the mystery about this post right there in the first paragraph. Steve Berardi, the PhotoNaturalist, thinks there's one item everyone who ever sets foot in the out of doors with a camera in hand should be carrying inside their camera bag. It's…

Light Painting Flowers

This post combines a few of my favorite things: light painting and backlighting. Add the fact that it's a translucent subject and I'm in hog heaven. The post to which I'm referring was written by Ken Hubbard of the Tamron Angle of View blog, and it really features a lovely photograph and some helpful information about painting with light. It's also good advice if you're looking to set your work apart by approaching a fairly standard subject with a unique technique. In this case, Mr. Hubbard used light painting (interesting) as a backlight (even more interesting) to light a flower and make it appear as if it were really glowing from within (most interesting of all). A great example of a simple technique and a subject we've all seen before, having been combined to great effect. Well done on all counts!

http://tamrontechstips.typepad.com/tamron_blog/2012/04/macro-flowers-part-1-backlit-painting-with-light.html.
DPMag
This post combines a few of my favorite things: light painting and backlighting. Add the fact that it's a translucent subject and I'm in hog heaven. The post to which I'm referring was written by Ken Hubbard of the Tamron Angle of View blog, and it really features a lovely…

iPad Card Reader

Care to use your iPad as something more than a portfolio display device? There are some options out there that allow you to do that, but the one that really intrigues me is the M.I.C. All-in-One card reader for the iPad. It allows users of a variety of media types to download directly to the iPad, whether they're working with CompactFlash, SD or MicroSD cards. It even has a USB port which this reader very useful for practically any photographer. The ability to display RAW files straight from your Nikon and Canon cameras is pretty great too. Learn more at M.I.C.'s web site, http://store.micgadget.com/ipad3-card-readers/315-cf-sd-high-speed-card-reader-for-ipad-3.html.
DPMag
Care to use your iPad as something more than a portfolio display device? There are some options out there that allow you to do that, but the one that really intrigues me is the M.I.C. All-in-One card reader for the iPad. It allows users of a variety of media types…

Underwater Genius

As far as I'm concerned, David Doubilet sets the standard for underwater photography. I first learned of him via his book, Water, Light, Time, which was published more than a decade ago. It's a stunning book, and at the time when it came out I had literally never seen underwater photography that looked anything like that. Doubilet was, and clearly still is, ahead of his time. The New York Times lens blog recently published a collection of his work along with a brief interview with Mr. Doubilet that brought up a couple of issues that I'd never really considered before—namely, that underwater photographers are shooting digitally these days. I guess it makes perfect sense, but I just had never really considered all of the challenges and benefits of taking one of these supercomputers we call cameras below the surface of the sea. The benefits make perfect sense, too: increased light sensitivity, sharpness and color rendition that allow the photographer to make pictures better than ever before. And that means Doubilet can really create images of undersea life that are especially mind-blowing. Check out the gallery and interview at http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/25/photos-that-move-and-flow-underwater, and then do whatever you can to get your hands on that stunning book that introduced me to Mr. Doubilet's genius.
DPMag
As far as I'm concerned, David Doubilet sets the standard for underwater photography. I first learned of him via his book, Water, Light, Time, which was published more than a decade ago. It's a stunning book, and at the time when it came out I had literally never seen underwater…

Astro-Twitter

U.S. astronaut Soichi Noguchi has a twitter account. Sometimes he shares pictures. This glimpse into the life of an astronaut is very cool, as you might imagine. Oh, did I forget to mention that Mr. Noguchi is tweeting pictures that were made while aboard the International Space Station, orbiting miles above the earth? Yeah, that changes the dynamic a little bit. Astronaut Noguchi tweets photos from space walks and events aboard the space station, many of them originally captured by Italian astronaut counterpart Paolo Nespoli. Follow Astronaut Noguchi's feed at https://twitter.com/#!/@Astro_Soichi and then maybe reconsider your next tweet about what you had for lunch!
DPMag
U.S. astronaut Soichi Noguchi has a twitter account. Sometimes he shares pictures. This glimpse into the life of an astronaut is very cool, as you might imagine. Oh, did I forget to mention that Mr. Noguchi is tweeting pictures that were made while aboard the International Space Station, orbiting miles…

Adobe Creative Cloud

Along with the newest version of Photoshop, CS6, that Adobe recently announced, it also introduced us to a new service known as the Adobe Creative Cloud. For a monthly subscription fee you can have unlimited access not only to Photoshop, but to Premiere and Dreamweaver and 23 other fully functional Adobe Creative Suite products. And these programs aren't accessed from some server online: they're fully functional programs that you download to your computer, just like users who pay a one-time licensing fee do. So for anyone who thinks of the high price of Photoshop as a preventative reason for not installing the industry standard software (especially if you're unsure whether you'll really take to the program itself) now you can try it out on a month-to-month basis and avoid the big one-time payment. And for those who always want to upgrade but don't love the cost, this approach could make sense for you too. Best of all, rather than waiting for new features to be released in new versions of the software, The Creative Cloud will allow Adobe to implement new features via updates, affording you early access to the best new bits of programming. It's a brilliant idea, and one that I'm sure is going to bring Photoshop to an even wider audience of photographers. Add to it features like extra cloud storage, syncing and collaboration and Adobe Creative Cloud becomes a really intriguing option. Check out what Photoshop guru Scott Kelby thinks of the program after he got hands on demo straight from the folks from Adobe.

http://scottkelby.com/2012/my-adobe-creative-cloud-quick-qa/
DPMag
Along with the newest version of Photoshop, CS6, that Adobe recently announced, it also introduced us to a new service known as the Adobe Creative Cloud. For a monthly subscription fee you can have unlimited access not only to Photoshop, but to Premiere and Dreamweaver and 23 other fully functional…
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