The Vest-Pocket DSLR

Another heads up courtesy of the awesome DIY Photography blog. Have you ever wondered what would happen if you could somehow mate your expensive new D-SLR with a 100-year-old vest pocket camera? Neither have I. But thankfully photographer Rick Nunn did, and he took lots of pictures along the way so we can see how he was able to put his 100-year-old Kodak vest pocket lens on his two-year-old Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLR. The approach is actually fairly simple, and calls for only a bit of engineering on the old camera and the use of an adapter on the new one. The resulting picture doesn't look bad at all, but I think I'd want to use this not so much for the images I could create as to see the looks on the faces of the people I'm photographing. If you'd like to give it a try yourself, you're in luck: Mr. Nunn made a video showing exactly how he did it.

http://www.diyphotography.net/with-an-average-age-of-50-the-mkii-a-vest-pocket-kodak-totally-rock.
DPMag
Another heads up courtesy of the awesome DIY Photography blog. Have you ever wondered what would happen if you could somehow mate your expensive new D-SLR with a 100-year-old vest pocket camera? Neither have I. But thankfully photographer Rick Nunn did, and he took lots of pictures along the way…

Virtual Lighting Studio

I've always been a fan of the idea that photographers should make good notes. It's because I learned long ago that repeatability is the key to becoming a skilled photographer. The idea being that anybody can stumble across a good photograph, but being able to repeat it takes real skill. To that end I've always tried to make good notes about all sorts of things: darkroom directions, compositional elements, and especially lighting setups. It's the lighting notes that have paid off most in my professional career, because these are the things that really impact how a finished photograph looks. Lighting diagrams are a great way to ensure that when a lighting setup really works, you can repeat it without too much trouble. The problem is that those diagrams don't do the best job of showing exactly what the finished product will look like. Nor do lighting diagrams let you test how subtle changes will affect your subject or your photograph. So I was pretty excited to discover the Virtual Lighting Studio online. It's a surprisingly fun and tool, and one that's immensely useful if you're trying to learn about lighting—or take your lighting to the next level. With a 3D rendering of a subject (albeit not the most photogenic one) on whom you can try any number of exposures, light positions and colored gels to predetermine the affect of your lights on the finished product without the need to have an actual person standing in front of you while you move actual lights. Best of all, the Virtual Lighting Studio creates a lighting diagram for you, so that you can see exactly how to create the result you're after. Take a look via the DIY Photography blog.

http://www.diyphotography.net/virtual-lighting-studio-let-you-light-at-with-no-studio.
DPMag
I've always been a fan of the idea that photographers should make good notes. It's because I learned long ago that repeatability is the key to becoming a skilled photographer. The idea being that anybody can stumble across a good photograph, but being able to repeat it takes real skill.…

Lightroom 4 Is Built For Extreme Contrast Adjustments

For those of you Lightroom users who may be holding off on upgrading to the newly released Lightroom 4, this post from DP Review might just make you change your mind. It's an explanation of how to make extreme contrast edits within LR4, but it doesn't just serve as a simple how-to. It also helps to explain how the processing controls work differently within this version of Lightroom as compared to previous versions. In the end, the new processing engine allows for less overlap among lighting adjustments, which means greater control, more fine tuning, and the ability to extract the absolute maximum amount of useful image forming data from today's supersensitive high-dynamic-range digital camera sensors. Lightroom 4 isn't just the next step in the workflow software's evolution, it's a big step forward in editing control. And that means it can help you create much better photographs right out of the box. Read all about it at www.dpreview.com.

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/1205103502/extreme-contrast-edits-in-lightroom-4-and-acr-7.
DPMag
For those of you Lightroom users who may be holding off on upgrading to the newly released Lightroom 4, this post from DP Review might just make you change your mind. It's an explanation of how to make extreme contrast edits within LR4, but it doesn't just serve as a…

A Must-Have For Every Camera Bag

Carry a trash bag. There, I blew all the mystery about this post right there in the first paragraph. Steve Berardi, the PhotoNaturalist, thinks there's one item everyone who ever sets foot in the out of doors with a camera in hand should be carrying inside their camera bag. It's a simple trash bag, which has a million uses. Most notably, it's the perfect protector in case it starts to rain. But it's also handy to become a makeshift light diffuser for a macro photograph, and it can even become a bit of a softbox for a flash if you're in a pinch—something I've written about on this very web site. Check out PhotoNaturalist to get the scoop straight from the horse's mouth, and then be sure to peruse the plentiful reader comments for a bunch of other great reasons why you should carry this must-have accessory. And in the meantime, just trust me and stuff a trash bag inside your camera bag. 

http://photonaturalist.net/something-that-should-be-in-every-camera-bag.
DPMag
Carry a trash bag. There, I blew all the mystery about this post right there in the first paragraph. Steve Berardi, the PhotoNaturalist, thinks there's one item everyone who ever sets foot in the out of doors with a camera in hand should be carrying inside their camera bag. It's…

Light Painting Flowers

This post combines a few of my favorite things: light painting and backlighting. Add the fact that it's a translucent subject and I'm in hog heaven. The post to which I'm referring was written by Ken Hubbard of the Tamron Angle of View blog, and it really features a lovely photograph and some helpful information about painting with light. It's also good advice if you're looking to set your work apart by approaching a fairly standard subject with a unique technique. In this case, Mr. Hubbard used light painting (interesting) as a backlight (even more interesting) to light a flower and make it appear as if it were really glowing from within (most interesting of all). A great example of a simple technique and a subject we've all seen before, having been combined to great effect. Well done on all counts!

http://tamrontechstips.typepad.com/tamron_blog/2012/04/macro-flowers-part-1-backlit-painting-with-light.html.
DPMag
This post combines a few of my favorite things: light painting and backlighting. Add the fact that it's a translucent subject and I'm in hog heaven. The post to which I'm referring was written by Ken Hubbard of the Tamron Angle of View blog, and it really features a lovely…

iPad Card Reader

Care to use your iPad as something more than a portfolio display device? There are some options out there that allow you to do that, but the one that really intrigues me is the M.I.C. All-in-One card reader for the iPad. It allows users of a variety of media types to download directly to the iPad, whether they're working with CompactFlash, SD or MicroSD cards. It even has a USB port which this reader very useful for practically any photographer. The ability to display RAW files straight from your Nikon and Canon cameras is pretty great too. Learn more at M.I.C.'s web site, http://store.micgadget.com/ipad3-card-readers/315-cf-sd-high-speed-card-reader-for-ipad-3.html.
DPMag
Care to use your iPad as something more than a portfolio display device? There are some options out there that allow you to do that, but the one that really intrigues me is the M.I.C. All-in-One card reader for the iPad. It allows users of a variety of media types…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.