Photography Is Not A Crime

I've been reading a lot lately about the increasing criminalization of photography.
By William Sawalich
I've been reading a lot lately about the increasing criminalization of photography. It seems that more and more photographers are stopped by police officers all over the country for doing nothing more than photographing on public property. And many photographers, it seems, do not understand their rights: we have the…

The Philosophy Of Portraiture

I mentioned a great video yesterday about an early landscape master. So how about another phenomenal video today, this time featuring a current portrait master? Nadav Kandar is as accomplished and talented a portraitist as has ever walked the earth, I'd say. Produced as a tie-in to this summer's London Olympics, this 13-minute video features not only examples of Kandar's work, and the photographer at work, but mostly it features him discussing his philosophy of portraiture and photography. It's an intellectual study of a way of making portraits, and it's fascinating. If you're into portraits, this is probably equivalent to a whole semester's worth of a college class on portraiture—all in just a few minutes of YouTube video. Thanks to The Strobist for sharing it.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/07/nadav-kander-on-portraiture.html
DPMag
I mentioned a great video yesterday about an early landscape master. So how about another phenomenal video today, this time featuring a current portrait master? Nadav Kandar is as accomplished and talented a portraitist as has ever walked the earth, I'd say. Produced as a tie-in to this summer's London…

Ansel On Video

Regular readers know how much I love a good photographic documentary. Getting a glimpse behind the scenes to watch a world-class photographer at work is about as good as it gets. Thankfully because of the age in which we're living, this sort of special glimpse into a photographer's workflow can happen fairly regularly as so many wonderful documentaries have been uploaded to YouTube. One of the earliest photo documentaries I've ever seen is this 1957 film by Beaumont and Nancy Newhall—the 20th century's first couple of photography—about iconic nature photographer Ansel Adams. Take a look at John Paul Caponigro's blog to get a glimpse into the master's working approach, a breakdown of his equipment, and even a few minutes of the man himself performing on piano. A worthwhile video for fans of Ansel and fans of good documentaries alike. It's full of wonderful little quirks about Adams. For instance, you may have heard that his preferred vehicle had a large platform strapped to the roof. But did you know that it was also an old eight-passenger limousine? The sight of the man himself loading his car full of gear to head out for work is simply wonderful. (After you finish this video, root around Mr. Caponigro's blog to find a few other videos of Ansel at work.) 

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/9374/ansel-adams-photographer-1957-documentary/
DPMag
Regular readers know how much I love a good photographic documentary. Getting a glimpse behind the scenes to watch a world-class photographer at work is about as good as it gets. Thankfully because of the age in which we're living, this sort of special glimpse into a photographer's workflow can…

The Photographer Who Photographs Photographers

Abe Frajndlich has been publishing stories about photographers lately over at the Feature Shoot blog. Mr. Frajndlich spent the better part of 30 years photographing famous photographers—the photographers' photographer, you might say. His book, Penelope's Hungry Eyes, is all about his experiences photographing the likes of William Eggleston, Gordon Parks, Cindy Sherman, and a wonderful story about a run-in with Ansel Adams and a feisty Imogen Cunningham. Start here, then be sure to check out the story of working with a sometimes difficult, sometimes charming Annie Leibovitz. The photographs are consistently wonderful, and the stories are priceless.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2012/08/the-story-of-ansel-adams-imogen-cunningham-and-a-pot-plant
DPMag
Abe Frajndlich has been publishing stories about photographers lately over at the Feature Shoot blog. Mr. Frajndlich spent the better part of 30 years photographing famous photographers—the photographers' photographer, you might say. His book, Penelope's Hungry Eyes, is all about his experiences photographing the likes of William Eggleston, Gordon Parks,…

A Hacking Story Serves As A Reminder About Backing Up Important Files

Last week a hacker made news outside of the blogosphere when Wired writer Mat Honan was the unfortunate victim of a cyber attack that exploited weaknesses in Amazon and Apple security systems in order to gain access to, and eventually eliminate, all of the data (including photographs) on Honan's iPhone, iPad and laptop. It's an interesting story for anyone who relies on technology to manage personal data, but even more interesting for those of us with tons of invaluable images in our care. Interestingly, it turns out this article includes mention of Peter Krogh's DPBestflow 3-2-1 backup strategy, advocating three backups comprised of two different formats and one off site. That's a strategy I've been espousing for years, one that most people think seems like it would be just too much trouble. I've long advocated for keeping a backup of everything not only off-site but in the cloud, and it's good to get a little bit of validation in this instance. Just a shame Honan had to lose irreplaceable photographs in the process. Read the story for its general interest appeal, or to give yourself a potentially necessary kick in the pants to get your backups in order. Either way it's quite worthwhile.

http://news.doddleme.com/news-room/a-serious-hack-affects-amazon-and-apple-why-you-should-be-concerned

DPMag
Last week a hacker made news outside of the blogosphere when Wired writer Mat Honan was the unfortunate victim of a cyber attack that exploited weaknesses in Amazon and Apple security systems in order to gain access to, and eventually eliminate, all of the data (including photographs) on Honan's iPhone,…

My Favorite Mars Rover Photography Links

The Olympics aren't the only out-of-this world visual spectacle going on these days. As promised, here are a few of my favorite links to the photographic story of NASA's Curiosity rover. The device began beaming back images of the red planet shortly after touchdown. For a look at the first color image of mars, as well as a great breakdown of the camera tech included on the rover, check out an interesting piece at DPreview. The best one-stop location for all sorts of interesting mission information and every awesome photograph sent back from the rover, check out Spaceflight101. It's a repository for space exploration information in general, and the mission updates from Mars is the perfect place to find every high-quality image that NASA has released. Lastly, if you're curious about Curiosity's camera technology, check out this interview with the camera project manager, Mike Ravine, who discusses how and why the camera was selected for the mission—and why it's only 2 megapixels. Being able to see these images almost immediately as they happen, and to dig into the technology with those who really are hands on with the project, serves as a reminder about just what an exciting time it is in the world of photographic technology.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/08/07/NASA-Curiosity-Rover-sends-back-first-color-images-from-Mars
http://www.spaceflight101.com/msl-mission-updates-3.html
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/08/08/Curiosity-interview-with-Malin-Space-Science-Systems-Mike-Ravine

DPMag
The Olympics aren't the only out-of-this world visual spectacle going on these days. As promised, here are a few of my favorite links to the photographic story of NASA's Curiosity rover. The device began beaming back images of the red planet shortly after touchdown. For a look at the first…
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