Lens Hood Operator Error

Today I've got a little tip for you. No link, no video, just a simple little bit of advice. And, I suppose, a call to action. Here it is: Don't use your camera with your lens hood pointing backwards! I can't tell you how often I see this, and how crazy it makes me. I know, I've got problems, but seriously: don't use your lens shade backwards. I'd rather you not have a lens shade at all than that you have one, and keep it attached to the camera, but then you don't actually take the time (all of 15 seconds) to reverse it when you're ready to shoot. I understand autofocus meaning you may not need to reach the focus ring, and I also understand that you might like to stow your camera with the hood reversed because it saves on space, but for goodness sake you're just making the camera heavier and more user un-friendly when you do it this way (because zooming and focusing do become more difficult), not to mention the fact that you're totally not protecting the lens and you're leaving it vulnerable to that horrible lens flare stuff. So seriously, just do me this one favor for the sake of my sanity: don't use your lens hood backwards. Flip it around. Chances are you'll take better pictures this way, too. 
DPMag
Today I've got a little tip for you. No link, no video, just a simple little bit of advice. And, I suppose, a call to action. Here it is: Don't use your camera with your lens hood pointing backwards! I can't tell you how often I see this, and how…

Large Format Polaroid Reinvented

As a commercial photographer I'm always looking for ways to differentiate my work from the masses. One thing I've turned to lately—or, more accurately, something I've returned to—is film. I'll shoot the occasional medium format negative or even 4x5 transparency. I don't use the 8x10 view camera any more—though it sits ready in the corner of my studio--because the film is so darn rare, and so darn expensive. Not too many years ago I owned the necessary processing equipment to shoot 8x10 Polaroid film. Alas, it is long gone, and has been for a while. But the Impossible Project, the folks who have breathed new life into small format Polaroid instant films, are now working on a new version of 8x10 instant film as well. This is great news for those of us who want to differentiate, and for those of us who don't mind the cumbersome process of working with an 8x10 view camera. Man, are those big instant prints a sight to behold. I can't wait to get my hands on some of this stuff. If only they would hurry up and get it to market!

http://www.pixiq.com/article/reinventing-instant-polaroid-8x10-film
DPMag
As a commercial photographer I'm always looking for ways to differentiate my work from the masses. One thing I've turned to lately—or, more accurately, something I've returned to—is film. I'll shoot the occasional medium format negative or even 4x5 transparency. I don't use the 8x10 view camera any more—though it…

How To Choose The Right Tripod

Here's something you don't often get: advice on how to choose the right tripod. Sure, you've heard plenty of things about quick release plates and tripod heights and the makeup of a head and its movements, but really all of that stuff is usually opinions. "I like a ballhead, you probably will too," for instance. But what about the nuts and bolts stuff, like how much will a tripod hold, how steady will it be, and how comfortable will it be to work with? It's best before buying that you go to your local camera store and get your hands on a prospective tripod so that you can figure out what you like. Here are some suggestions you can keep in mind for when you go to test a prospective tripod's functionality, to be sure it's not just right, but right for what you need a tripod to do. Kevin Kopp produced this write-up on his Pixiq blog based on insights from former Outdoor Photographer editor-in-chief Rob Sheppard. Rob's got great suggestions for what to look for in a tripod so that you can make a smarter buying decision. 

http://www.pixiq.com/article/eight-tips-for-choosing-the-best-tripod
DPMag
Here's something you don't often get: advice on how to choose the right tripod. Sure, you've heard plenty of things about quick release plates and tripod heights and the makeup of a head and its movements, but really all of that stuff is usually opinions. "I like a ballhead, you…

Learning Lightroom 4

Do you want to learn how to use Lightroom 4? Well Scott Kelby and Matt Kloskowski have got the perfect solution: attend one of their day-long Lightroom 4 seminars to go from newbie to expert (or, at least "totally comfortable using the program guy") in just a few hours time. For 99 bucks you get a day-long session with Mr. Kloskowski—the chap who developed the seminar—covering topics from setting up the software correctly, to working with Raw, Tiff and Jpeg image files, integrating with Photoshop, and printing enlargements and books. Better still, you get freebies that include a workbook, keyboard shortcut guide and a digital download of $99 worth of post-processing effects from OnOne software. Check out the Kelby Training web site for a schedule of Lightroom 4 seminars, and while you're there check out some of the other great photography classes on tap from this world-class educational organization. 

http://kelbytraining.com/live
DPMag
Do you want to learn how to use Lightroom 4? Well Scott Kelby and Matt Kloskowski have got the perfect solution: attend one of their day-long Lightroom 4 seminars to go from newbie to expert (or, at least "totally comfortable using the program guy") in just a few hours time.…

Point (Your Finger) And Shoot

Point and shoot takes on a new meaning with this camera-equipped "EyeRing." It's a ring you wear on your finger and, while it's quite clunky as rings go, I'd consider it fairly compact in terms of cameras. It captures digital photos and wirelessly delivers them to a smartphone for instant viewing. It was developed not with photographers in mind so much as a medical device for vision assistance. It's a quirky but obviously useful little tool. I can't decide if it's more weird than brilliant, but I do know this: I want one! If only the MIT Science Lab geniuses developing it would hurry up and get it to market. Sell it for $39 and call it the first real "digital" camera. (Get it? Digital? As in digit, like your finger? Punny.) I'm guessing that's not going to happen any time soon, but a guy can dream, can't he?

http://inhabitat.com/with-the-camera-equipped-eyering-you-can-point-at-an-object-and-take-a-photo
DPMag
Point and shoot takes on a new meaning with this camera-equipped "EyeRing." It's a ring you wear on your finger and, while it's quite clunky as rings go, I'd consider it fairly compact in terms of cameras. It captures digital photos and wirelessly delivers them to a smartphone for instant…

Photoshop CS6 Resources

Way back in the heat of summer, Scott Kelby posted a great list of resources for new users of—and those who are considering the purchase of—Adobe Photoshop CS6. I made a note of it, but never got around to sharing it. Until now. Since I'm (finally) entertaining my own purchase of the latest version of Adobe's flagship photo editing program, I figured I'd share these links with you. There are ten links on Kelby's Weekly Photo Tips blog post, and all of them offer a great introduction to PS CS 6—everything from tips and tricks to detailed explorations of new features and their benefits. Better still, Kelby links to a resource for purchasing the program for 75% off retail for any teachers or students in your home. And remember, if the purchase price is too high for your comfort level, you've always got the option of Adobe's subscription-based Creative Cloud service that makes accessing all of its imaging software much more attainable with only a small monthly fee.

http://weeklyphototips.blogspot.com/2012/07/photoshop-cs6-resources-for-learning.html
DPMag
Way back in the heat of summer, Scott Kelby posted a great list of resources for new users of—and those who are considering the purchase of—Adobe Photoshop CS6. I made a note of it, but never got around to sharing it. Until now. Since I'm (finally) entertaining my own purchase…
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