Food Photography And Lighting Techniques

I teach a product photography class, and in one lesson we discuss food photography. To that end I recently checked out a new book about food photography, called (appropriately) Food Photography & Lighting by Teri Campbell. Mr. Campbell has 25 years of professional food photography experience, and it shows in this tremendous book. It seems to me that if you're looking to learn about food photography, this just might be your best bet. Not only does it cover business and practical aspects of professional commercial food photography, a good half of the book is dedicated to nuts and bolts hands-on lighting tips and techniques. And they're detailed: this light was here, with this modifier, for this particular purpose, and so on. I'm fairly convinced that if a beginning photographer spent enough time with this book they'd become a pretty polished food photographer. I don't often offer such effusive praise to technical books, but this one's something special. Best of all, like the best photography tutorials, the principles translate across styles ad apply to many different photographic disciplines.

http://www.amazon.com/Food-Photography-Lighting-Photographers-Irresistible/dp/0321840739
DPMag
I teach a product photography class, and in one lesson we discuss food photography. To that end I recently checked out a new book about food photography, called (appropriately) Food Photography & Lighting by Teri Campbell. Mr. Campbell has 25 years of professional food photography experience, and it shows in…

Photography Grants Available

Just about the only thing better than taking pictures is getting paid to take pictures. And just about the only thing better than someone licensing your work or assigning you to a shoot is receiving a grant for your work; it serves as a rousing endorsement of your own personal work. Jacob Maentz at the Lightstalking blog has compiled a very useful list of 10 places to apply for photography grants and scholarships, and there's something for everyone—for young photographers and seasoned professionals alike.

http://www.lightstalking.com/10-photography-grants-and-schlorships-for-amateurs-and-professionals
DPMag
Just about the only thing better than taking pictures is getting paid to take pictures. And just about the only thing better than someone licensing your work or assigning you to a shoot is receiving a grant for your work; it serves as a rousing endorsement of your own personal…

Robert Knight's Rock And Roll Photography

If I could go back and do it all over again, I think rather than becoming a photographer I might become a rock star instead. I think I may have missed my calling. I'm a huge music fan, and so when I see something about the early days of rock 'n roll—especially when it's crossed with photography—I'm smitten. Such is the case with the story of rock photographer Robert Knight. He photographed all the big acts back in the day, from the Rolling Stones to Led Zeppelin—the latter of which he shares a great story in this, the first in a series of interviews posted on Marc Silber's internet TV show. After that taste of Mr. Knight's work and his gallery, you can head over to rockprophecies.com to watch the trailer for the 2009 movie of the same name, depicting the story of Mr. Knight's career in rock and photography.

http://www.silberstudios.tv/videos/robert-knight-rock-photography-led-zeppelin/
DPMag
If I could go back and do it all over again, I think rather than becoming a photographer I might become a rock star instead. I think I may have missed my calling. I'm a huge music fan, and so when I see something about the early days of rock…

The Streets As Arcade Landscapes

It's not the place that's special, it's how you look at it. That could be the photographic lesson taught in the photographs of Christian Aslund, who turns the streets of Hong Kong into a two-dimensional video game thanks to a very simple technique: choosing an unusual perspective. Shooting down from far above, Aslund staged photos of models in various positions for a shoe designer's advertising campaign that simply transform the street below into a quirky video game-style environment. It's a plain and simple technique that works well and is, obviously, capable of making some pretty awesome imagery. It's also a good reminder for photographers: it's not the place that has to be important, it's how you choose to look at it.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2013/02/aslund-hong-kong/
DPMag
It's not the place that's special, it's how you look at it. That could be the photographic lesson taught in the photographs of Christian Aslund, who turns the streets of Hong Kong into a two-dimensional video game thanks to a very simple technique: choosing an unusual perspective. Shooting down from…

Photographic Superbowl Commercial

Last week I should have mentioned how much I loved the Superbowl commercial about the farmers. It was for Ram trucks, and that makes sense but was almost immaterial—at least for me. I was highly aware as I was watching the commercial unfold (to the soundtrack of the incomparable Paul Harvey) that I was looking at some tremendous still photography. Some of it was lightly animated, but for the most part these stills were stills, served straight up. What I didn't know, and do now, is that ten world-class photographers were contracted by an adman to study life on the farm. The result... well, it speaks for itself. If you weren't fortunate enough to see it in real time, here's a link, courtesy of A Photo Editor. Also included are links to the tremendous photographers featured, including William Allard, Kurt Markus and Matt Turley.

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2013/02/05/the-1-rated-super-bowl-commercial-shot-by-10-photographers/
DPMag
Last week I should have mentioned how much I loved the Superbowl commercial about the farmers. It was for Ram trucks, and that makes sense but was almost immaterial—at least for me. I was highly aware as I was watching the commercial unfold (to the soundtrack of the incomparable Paul…

A Remedy For Visual Bias

Do you ever feel like you're consistently producing photographs that are somehow skewed? What I mean is, do you find yourself occasionally producing work that is either too dark, or too light? Maybe too warm, or too cool? A lot of these problems are solved by keeping your monitor well controlled with profiling hardware, but I've found that I still develop habits that affect my work. Reading The Online Photographer recently I found a great way to combat at least one of those trends, and I put it to work immediately. You see, I'd been feeling that my work was erring on the "too bright" side. Not necessarily overexposed, but just brighter than I felt like it needed to be. And it occurred to me when reading about Canvas Value in Photoshop on TOP that my fairly bright computer background could be making me overcompensate in my photos, producing work that is brighter than it needs to be. So I adjusted my Photoshop Canvas Value to make it a fairly dark gray. Now when compared to the background against which I'm working, a slightly darker photo will appear "normal" and I'll be more inclined to produce subtly darker work—counteracting that disturbing trend that had been skewing my work of late. Sometimes it's the simplest techniques that have the biggest impact on your photographs.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2012/11/a-tip-canvas-value-in-photoshop.html
DPMag
Do you ever feel like you're consistently producing photographs that are somehow skewed? What I mean is, do you find yourself occasionally producing work that is either too dark, or too light? Maybe too warm, or too cool? A lot of these problems are solved by keeping your monitor well…
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