Awesome Lighting Tutorial Videos

I like lighting tutorials. Sure, I'm a studio photographer and sure I work with lighting tools on a daily basis, but part of what makes this job so interesting is continually learning new techniques. (The internet is full of lighting tutorials so it's a pretty easy way to keep learning about photography without worrying about ponying up for tuition.) But while it's often the case that lighting tutorials are interesting—if for no other reason than it's neat to watch photographers work—it's rare that I think they're especially useful for audiences comprised of both newbies and experts. Such is the case with The Slanted Lens web site and its series of exceptional lighting tutorial videos. Not only do they serve as tremendous technical explanations of particular light modifiers—like Octodomes, Softboxes and Beauty Dishes—but they really show practical hands-on uses of these tools and how they differ subtly from one another. Whether you want to know about how they change at different distances or when using modifiers of different sizes, it's really a great starting place for studio lighting techniques. And those techniques, in my opinion, translate across all photographic disciplines.

http://theslantedlens.com/2012/understanding-octodomesocto-boxes-a-lighting-tutorial
DPMag
I like lighting tutorials. Sure, I'm a studio photographer and sure I work with lighting tools on a daily basis, but part of what makes this job so interesting is continually learning new techniques. (The internet is full of lighting tutorials so it's a pretty easy way to keep learning…

Awesome Insect Eyes

I don't generally send you to photo galleries just to look at neat pictures; I figure there are plenty of places to get your fill of those on the Internet. But every once in a while something strikes me as just so dang cool that I can't help but point it out. The astronaut star trails were just such a case earlier this week, and from supercool shots on the macro scale, how about equally amazing images at the opposite end of the unseen spectrum—the microscopic world of insects. So today I present you with an amazing collection of gorgeous photos of not just insects, but little parts of insects. Insect eyes, in fact. That's right: microscopic images of bugs eyes that are not only really interesting for their ability to show us something we can't normally see with the naked eye, but they're also really beautiful works of art. Photographer Shikhei Goh is clearly a master of this microscopic domain.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/06/magnificent-macro-photos-of-insect-eyes-by-shikhei-goh
DPMag
I don't generally send you to photo galleries just to look at neat pictures; I figure there are plenty of places to get your fill of those on the Internet. But every once in a while something strikes me as just so dang cool that I can't help but point…

Product Photography Tutorials

I teach a studio product photography class, so I've seen my fair share of product photos—from mediocre to outstanding. This collection of images from Alex Koloskov is not only pretty great, but it's a great teaching tool as well. And that's something pretty darn appealing me; I'm always looking for a way to teach certain fundamental photographic techniques on which all studio product photography is based. Translucent subjects, specular surfaces, splashes and motion… These are things I spend time specifically teaching week after week in my class, and I know how important these fundamentals are if you want to learn about lighting. So if you're interested in learning more about still life photography, or more importantly how those lighting techniques can be applied across a number of other photographic disciplines, you absolutely must check out these tutorials and behind the scenes videos Mr. Koloskov has posted at Pixiq.com.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/studio-photography-digest
DPMag
I teach a studio product photography class, so I've seen my fair share of product photos—from mediocre to outstanding. This collection of images from Alex Koloskov is not only pretty great, but it's a great teaching tool as well. And that's something pretty darn appealing me; I'm always looking for…

Star Trail Long Exposures From Outer Space

Oh my goodness. This is about the coolest stuff I've seen in a really long time. It's simple: just photographs of star trails. Photographed by astronauts. From outer space! It's super cool stuff. These light blurs not only include star trails, but colorful blurs of earth's cities passing by, and the flashes of lightning dotting the surface of the planet far below. Gorgeous images and very, very unique; definitely worth its must-see status. Makes you appreciate the importance of a unique perspective, too.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/06/star-trails-incredible-long-exposure-photographs-shot-from-space
DPMag
Oh my goodness. This is about the coolest stuff I've seen in a really long time. It's simple: just photographs of star trails. Photographed by astronauts. From outer space! It's super cool stuff. These light blurs not only include star trails, but colorful blurs of earth's cities passing by, and…

The Handmade ND Filter

I'm a little embarrassed to say that this photographic tip hadn't occurred to me until I read John Neel's post at the Pixiq blog. It's a technique that literally any photographer can do, and it doesn't require any special equipment at all. And it's genius in its simplicity. It's useful to help render bright, washed out skies darker, richer, and with more detail. It's a homemade neutral density filter—no, it's handmade, because all you need is your hand. Here's how it works. Starting with a long exposure—like 30 seconds in order to give yourself time to work carefully—you use your hand to burn in the sky, essentially blocking exposure from that part of the frame in order to make it appear darker in the finished picture. It's a technique that originated with large format film, and it's clearly a great one to have at the ready. Read all about it at http://www.pixiq.com/article/graduated-nd-effect.
DPMag
I'm a little embarrassed to say that this photographic tip hadn't occurred to me until I read John Neel's post at the Pixiq blog. It's a technique that literally any photographer can do, and it doesn't require any special equipment at all. And it's genius in its simplicity. It's useful…

The Woven Photo Viewer

While it's not strictly a serious photo enthusiast smartphone app, the Woven Photo Viewer (currently available for iPhone and Android at the grand ol' price of free dollars and free cents) is a super-cool photo app. It compiles the photographs from all your different online sources—like Facebook, Instagram, SmugMug, Flickr, Dropbox and more—and wrangles them all together in one place. I just downloaded it and I'm excited to get started. Instead of having a variety of shots available in a variety of disparate locations—none of which are conveniently accessed on my phone on the fly—finally my cell phone will act like a real honest to goodness pocket photo album. And the price is as right as can be, making it a super low-risk investment.

http://www.woventheapp.com
DPMag
While it's not strictly a serious photo enthusiast smartphone app, the Woven Photo Viewer (currently available for iPhone and Android at the grand ol' price of free dollars and free cents) is a super-cool photo app. It compiles the photographs from all your different online sources—like Facebook, Instagram, SmugMug, Flickr,…
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