Lenskirt

Have you ever tried to take pictures through glass? It could be that you're indoors trying to shoot out a window, or maybe you're at the zoo trying to photograph through a glass wall, or perhaps you'd simply like to make nice pictures of the fish in your fish tank. The trick for shooting through glass is to ensure that you're shooting from the darker side of the glass. Think of it like a window at night: if it's light inside and dark outside, you can't see out very well but your neighbors can sure see in. So to up your odds for shooting through glass--to eliminate the mirror-like reflections that interfere with the success of your shot--you need to block all light coming from behind you and keep it from hitting the glass that you're shooting through. A good approach is to wear a black t-shirt and try to get your lens right up to the glass, positioning your body so as to create a shadow through which you may shoot. Or, you could just get a Lenskirt. I'd never heard of this genius little device until I read about it in an ASMP blog. "Oh, it's brilliant!" That's what I literally said out loud the moment I first saw the thing. It's a pretty handy device if you ever find yourself struggling to shoot through glass. Check it out at www.lenskirt.com
DPMag
Have you ever tried to take pictures through glass? It could be that you're indoors trying to shoot out a window, or maybe you're at the zoo trying to photograph through a glass wall, or perhaps you'd simply like to make nice pictures of the fish in your fish tank.…

The Autographer Camera

I'm no science guy, but in my own simple-minded way I think this story's pretty cool. A company called OMG Life has created a wearable camera that automatically senses changes to its environment to trigger photos. It's an automatic camera, called the Autographer, and while it might seem a bit gimmicky, the science behind it certainly appears solid. Check it out at DP Review and keep an eye out for the thing in the real world. (Can you imagine a device that combines this level of automation with the Lytro's post-capture selectable focus? We'd all shoot perfect pictures all the time. Wouldn't we?)

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/09/24/omg-life-creates-autographer-wearable-automatic-camera
DPMag
I'm no science guy, but in my own simple-minded way I think this story's pretty cool. A company called OMG Life has created a wearable camera that automatically senses changes to its environment to trigger photos. It's an automatic camera, called the Autographer, and while it might seem a bit…

The Truth About DOF

One of the fundamental tenets of the physics of photography is the fact that longer lenses (more telephoto, I mean) produce a shallower depth of field. But this "fact" is, in fact, not accurate. I know, I've written about this principle, as has every other photography writer who has ever put pen to paper. But the fact is the physics just don't hold up. What is true is that the APPEARANCE of depth of field shrinks in telephoto pictures, because of the compression of a scene. If in fact you simply use a telephoto lens to "zoom in" to a particular part of a scene, and keep the elements in the scene the same relative size, then the physical measurements of the depth of field will not change. That's right: you can produce the same depth of field with a 19mm lens as you can with a 200mm lens. If you want to understand how, Peter West Carey from DPS has pointed out a great little article about this phenomenon, written by Matt Brandon of The Digital Trekker. Sure, you can still strap on a long lens and create the EFFECT of shallower depth of field in most cases, but for a complete understanding of the physics, have a look at this link. 

http://digital-photography-school.com/understanding-a-consistent-depth-of-field-with-varying-focal-lengths
DPMag
One of the fundamental tenets of the physics of photography is the fact that longer lenses (more telephoto, I mean) produce a shallower depth of field. But this "fact" is, in fact, not accurate. I know, I've written about this principle, as has every other photography writer who has ever…

The Hustler's MBA

This article about "The Hustler's MBA" has been getting a lot of play in my social networks in recent days. I think it speaks something special to photographers, because we're in a business with two distinct points of entry: college or assisting. Of course you can always do both, and maybe that's the best of both worlds. I went the college route, and while it has essentially worked for me, I definitely lament that I have never had the opportunity to learn from multiple photographers over years of assisting. Consequently, there's something inherently lacking from my knowledge base. That said, I also have some skills that non-college-educated photographers don't necessarily have. So, like I said in the beginning, it all just depends on which route you prefer. Anyway, take a look at this and consider that with any endeavor it's not a choice between doing one thing and doing nothing, it's a choice between doing one thing and something else. There are a lot of routes to success, whether it's career-oriented or happiness-oriented or photography-oriented or whatever you might choose. I think this article is worth a look, even if you're generally pro-college (as I am). It might be especially helpful if you're trying to consider two differing routes to a photographic career. Or maybe it's just a good read.  

http://tynan.com/hustle
DPMag
This article about "The Hustler's MBA" has been getting a lot of play in my social networks in recent days. I think it speaks something special to photographers, because we're in a business with two distinct points of entry: college or assisting. Of course you can always do both, and…

No-flicker DIY Fluorescent Studio Lighting

I'm a bit of a sucker for studio lighting hacks, so this article by Joe Edelman on the DIY photography blog is perfect for me. You see, Joe created a video series demonstrating how he lights with fluorescent light fixtures, which spurred him to create this article and video about how to make your own flicker-free sources. You see, this solves two problems. One, store-bought fluorescent light fixtures are great for producing beautiful light, but they're very expensive. And two, homemade fluorescent fixtures have for years produced a flickering light. But new advances in the types of low-energy, high-output flicker-free fluorescent bulbs means you can now build your own bright beautiful soft light sources for a fraction of the cost of the name brands. And because they're flicker free, you can use them for shooting video as well.

http://www.diyphotography.net/no-flicker-fluorescent-studio-lights-cheap
DPMag
I'm a bit of a sucker for studio lighting hacks, so this article by Joe Edelman on the DIY photography blog is perfect for me. You see, Joe created a video series demonstrating how he lights with fluorescent light fixtures, which spurred him to create this article and video about…

Reenacting A Civil War Photographic Process

NBC's Rock Center news program did a wonderful piece the other night on photographer Richard Barnes who uses civil war era photographic techniques to photograph civil war reenactments. With a large format view camera and a wet plate collodion process, Barnes combines the antique look of the reenactments with the thoroughly modern environment in which these events take place. The results are artful and interesting and downright beautiful, and they're as much about the history of photography as they are about the history of the Civil War, and the sociological study of these folks who reenact these events 150 years later. The whole thing is, frankly, fascinating.

http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/09/20/13992104-photographer-brings-civil-war-to-life-with-centuries-old-technology
DPMag
NBC's Rock Center news program did a wonderful piece the other night on photographer Richard Barnes who uses civil war era photographic techniques to photograph civil war reenactments. With a large format view camera and a wet plate collodion process, Barnes combines the antique look of the reenactments with the…
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