Summer Photo Destinations

Several weeks back, Haje Jan Kamps compiled a list of the world's 25 most beautiful travel destinations on his Pixiq photo blog. And now that school's out and summer travel season is here, I thought it might be a great time to revisit his post if you're looking for a great photographic destination for your summer vacation. The list is heavy on American National Parks, which I suppose shouldn't be a surprise, but also included are some beachy destinations and a few of the world's great cities, so there's really something for everyone on this list. If you're stumped as to where you might want to visit this year, start here for a great group of ideas. Where else can you choose between a visit to Chicago and the Red Sea?

http://www.pixiq.com/article/the-worlds-25-most-beautiful-travel-destinations
DPMag
Several weeks back, Haje Jan Kamps compiled a list of the world's 25 most beautiful travel destinations on his Pixiq photo blog. And now that school's out and summer travel season is here, I thought it might be a great time to revisit his post if you're looking for a…

The Next Vivian Maier?

While Jack Robinson wasn't the "nobody" the late Vivian Maier was, he's still the posthumous beneficiary of a tremendous photographic discovery. The celebrity portrait and fashion photographer, active primarily in the 1960s (and considered by 1970 to be one of the preeminent fashion photographers in the world), he gave up photography near the height of his career and became an intensely private person, rarely speaking of his past as a photographer. Robinson died in 1997 and is now receiving some of the accolades he surely deserved in life. After a friend was put in charge of his estate, he found more than 150,000 prints and negatives in a closet of Robinson's Memphis home. Some of the classic portraits found therein have been compiled into the book Jack Robinson: On Show: Portraits 1958-1972, a certain must-see.

http://www.retronaut.co/2012/05/celebrities-portraits-found-in-cupboard-1970s
DPMag
While Jack Robinson wasn't the "nobody" the late Vivian Maier was, he's still the posthumous beneficiary of a tremendous photographic discovery. The celebrity portrait and fashion photographer, active primarily in the 1960s (and considered by 1970 to be one of the preeminent fashion photographers in the world), he gave up…

Stop Motion Still Photography Video

Much as I don't love stock photography (for reasons of creative vacuousness and economical devaluation), I do love this new ad for Getty Images. Compiled from more than 800 different still images is a short film that tells a touching (well, at least until the main character turns to pills to solve all his problems) story and illustrates a great point: creativity solves all sorts of problems, and the creative approach taken here by Brazilian agency BBDO and mononymous director Cisma makes the world a distinctly happier, more creative place. Pretty good for just a little one-minute stop motion video clip.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/05/life-in-873-images-a-stop-motion-film-made-with-stock-photography
DPMag
Much as I don't love stock photography (for reasons of creative vacuousness and economical devaluation), I do love this new ad for Getty Images. Compiled from more than 800 different still images is a short film that tells a touching (well, at least until the main character turns to pills…

Flash Duration And Motion Blur

I teach a studio lighting class, and one of my favorite subjects is flash duration as it relates to exposure. (Because flash durations are so short, shutter speed doesn't affect them. Deep, I know. But trust me.) That always leads me into a discussion of how flash durations—while very, very brief—are still long enough to create motion blur on a fast-moving subject. Which then leads into a discussion about lowering a flash's output in order to shorten the flash duration in order to ultimately minimize the motion blur on the fast-moving subject. The DIY Photography blog now supports this thesis with visual evidence of a shorter flash duration and how it makes for sharper photographs, courtesy of photographer Sam McGuire. It also defies logic, though, because it is made with the Lumedyne 200w/s Action Pack flash unit. What's groundbreaking about this thing is that as flash output is increased, flash duration is decreased--a direct contradiction to the way this stuff usually works. But this is actually very helpful, since frequently more power is necessary in order to increase distance between flash and subject, or to be able to use light modifiers that more effectively shape the light. So the point of this post is two-fold: take a look at the DIY Photography blog to increase your understanding of how flash duration affects sharpness of moving objects, and then seriously consider the Lumedyne 200w/s Action Pack if you're serious about strobing sports action.

http://www.diyphotography.net/how-flash-duration-impacts-motion-blur
DPMag
I teach a studio lighting class, and one of my favorite subjects is flash duration as it relates to exposure. (Because flash durations are so short, shutter speed doesn't affect them. Deep, I know. But trust me.) That always leads me into a discussion of how flash durations—while very, very…

On Location With An Expert In Arches National Park

Photographer John Paul Caponigro writes a wonderful blog full of tremendous photography and post-production tips and techniques. He has a technical understanding of the digital workflow that makes learning easy, and frankly one that is impressive if for no other reason than because it's always done solely to serve the image. What I mean by that is that I think some online instructional gurus are really good at explaining technique and giving examples on images that are nothing like anything you'd ever hope to make. Mr. Caponigro, though, is a real life artist and his images demonstrate a depth not only of technique but of artistic vision as well. And that, to me, is a really special combination. Here's a link to a video of John Paul on location in Arches National Park, which is fun enough in and of itself. But the couple of great tips he throws out make it well worth the price of admission. The idea of watching the edges of light between brightness and shadow… that's an incredibly sophisticated bit of advice that you're not gonna get from any tech-head newbie out there. For that kind of princely advice, turn to a pro like John Paul Caponigro. 

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/8027/what-its-like-to-be-on-location-with-me-at-arches-canyonlands-national-park
DPMag
Photographer John Paul Caponigro writes a wonderful blog full of tremendous photography and post-production tips and techniques. He has a technical understanding of the digital workflow that makes learning easy, and frankly one that is impressive if for no other reason than because it's always done solely to serve the…

Sharks In The Studio

I've seen some cool anthropomorphic animal portraits before, but nothing quite like this. Photographer Michael Muller photographs sharks in his underwater studio. And that's not a euphemism for "he kinda lights them a little bit underwater." No, he really does treat it like a studio assignment—complete with an assistant holding a "hair light" on a boom over a swimming shark's dorsal fin. (I guess that really makes it a "fin light," huh?) Check out the cool behind the scenes photos of Muller's studio at A Photo Editor, then head over to his web site for a big gallery of beautiful sharks. 

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/03/06/michael-mullers-underwater-studio-for-shark-portraits
http://www.mullerphoto.com
DPMag
I've seen some cool anthropomorphic animal portraits before, but nothing quite like this. Photographer Michael Muller photographs sharks in his underwater studio. And that's not a euphemism for "he kinda lights them a little bit underwater." No, he really does treat it like a studio assignment—complete with an assistant holding…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.