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Flash Duration And Motion Blur

I teach a studio lighting class, and one of my favorite subjects is flash duration as it relates to exposure. (Because flash durations are so short, shutter speed doesn't affect them. Deep, I know. But trust me.) That always leads me into a discussion of how flash durations—while very, very brief—are still long enough to create motion blur on a fast-moving subject. Which then leads into a discussion about lowering a flash's output in order to shorten the flash duration in order to ultimately minimize the motion blur on the fast-moving subject. The DIY Photography blog now supports this thesis with visual evidence of a shorter flash duration and how it makes for sharper photographs, courtesy of photographer Sam McGuire. It also defies logic, though, because it is made with the Lumedyne 200w/s Action Pack flash unit. What's groundbreaking about this thing is that as flash output is increased, flash duration is decreased--a direct contradiction to the way this stuff usually works. But this is actually very helpful, since frequently more power is necessary in order to increase distance between flash and subject, or to be able to use light modifiers that more effectively shape the light. So the point of this post is two-fold: take a look at the DIY Photography blog to increase your understanding of how flash duration affects sharpness of moving objects, and then seriously consider the Lumedyne 200w/s Action Pack if you're serious about strobing sports action.

http://www.diyphotography.net/how-flash-duration-impacts-motion-blur
DPMag
I teach a studio lighting class, and one of my favorite subjects is flash duration as it relates to exposure. (Because flash durations are so short, shutter speed doesn't affect them. Deep, I know. But trust me.) That always leads me into a discussion of how flash durations—while very, very…

On Location With An Expert In Arches National Park

Photographer John Paul Caponigro writes a wonderful blog full of tremendous photography and post-production tips and techniques. He has a technical understanding of the digital workflow that makes learning easy, and frankly one that is impressive if for no other reason than because it's always done solely to serve the image. What I mean by that is that I think some online instructional gurus are really good at explaining technique and giving examples on images that are nothing like anything you'd ever hope to make. Mr. Caponigro, though, is a real life artist and his images demonstrate a depth not only of technique but of artistic vision as well. And that, to me, is a really special combination. Here's a link to a video of John Paul on location in Arches National Park, which is fun enough in and of itself. But the couple of great tips he throws out make it well worth the price of admission. The idea of watching the edges of light between brightness and shadow… that's an incredibly sophisticated bit of advice that you're not gonna get from any tech-head newbie out there. For that kind of princely advice, turn to a pro like John Paul Caponigro. 

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/8027/what-its-like-to-be-on-location-with-me-at-arches-canyonlands-national-park
DPMag
Photographer John Paul Caponigro writes a wonderful blog full of tremendous photography and post-production tips and techniques. He has a technical understanding of the digital workflow that makes learning easy, and frankly one that is impressive if for no other reason than because it's always done solely to serve the…

Sharks In The Studio

I've seen some cool anthropomorphic animal portraits before, but nothing quite like this. Photographer Michael Muller photographs sharks in his underwater studio. And that's not a euphemism for "he kinda lights them a little bit underwater." No, he really does treat it like a studio assignment—complete with an assistant holding a "hair light" on a boom over a swimming shark's dorsal fin. (I guess that really makes it a "fin light," huh?) Check out the cool behind the scenes photos of Muller's studio at A Photo Editor, then head over to his web site for a big gallery of beautiful sharks. 

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/03/06/michael-mullers-underwater-studio-for-shark-portraits
http://www.mullerphoto.com
DPMag
I've seen some cool anthropomorphic animal portraits before, but nothing quite like this. Photographer Michael Muller photographs sharks in his underwater studio. And that's not a euphemism for "he kinda lights them a little bit underwater." No, he really does treat it like a studio assignment—complete with an assistant holding…

Behind The Scenes Fashion Shoot



Ever wonder what it's like to work with stylists, lighting experts and models to create fashion images for an advertising campaign? There's a lot of details to manage beyond simply composing a create shot and capturing the perfect expression and pose. NYC fashion photographer Laura Rose walks you through the process in this video as she shoots the image campaign for Tamron's SP 24-70mm ƒ/2.8 Di VC USD lens.
Ever wonder what it's like to work with stylists, lighting experts and models to create fashion images for an advertising campaign? There's a lot of details to manage beyond simply composing a create shot and capturing the perfect expression and pose. NYC fashion photographer Laura Rose walks you through the…

Todd Hido On Video

I've been hoarding. Not physical objects, per se, but rather videos from some of my favorite photographers. These are folks who are a bit more artistic rather than strictly commercial, and so I'm thinking they might make for a bit of ideal crossover for this audience. Basically, if you don't already know about them, I think you should. I keep thinking I'm going to write a big roundup of them, and give you all the reasons why you should not only watch each respective video, but why each photographer is in his own way a genius. Instead, today I'm going to cop out and just write about one of them. Todd Hido is the photographer's name, and he has a phenomenal aesthetic as it relates not only to houses and structures, but also portraits and landscapes as well. "Art is a lie that tells us the truth," Hido says, quoting Picasso by way of explaining his work. And it makes sense in the context of this American Suburb X interview, which I linked to via the Picbod site. So start with this interview with Mr. Hido, glimpse his stellar photographs, and then visit his own web site to see more of his sublime photographs.
 
http://www.picbod.covmedia.co.uk/2012/02/20/todd-hido-interview
http://www.toddhido.com
DPMag
I've been hoarding. Not physical objects, per se, but rather videos from some of my favorite photographers. These are folks who are a bit more artistic rather than strictly commercial, and so I'm thinking they might make for a bit of ideal crossover for this audience. Basically, if you don't…

Brian Smith's Book Of Better Portraits

Celebrity portrait photographer Brian Smith is not only skilled at lighting and shooting, but it seems he's pretty good at sharing his expertise with other photographers as well. To that end, his new book aims to help all of us make better portraits, while still providing great behind-the-scenes glimpses into the creation of some of his most recognizable portraits. Everything from pre-production, shoot details to post-production particulars is outlined in detail. Culled from 30 years of celebrity portraits, Smith's book is half coffee table monograph, half how-to instruction manual. And that adds up to a must-read for any portrait photographer.

http://briansmith.com/blog/2012/05/a-book-30-years-in-the-making.
DPMag
Celebrity portrait photographer Brian Smith is not only skilled at lighting and shooting, but it seems he's pretty good at sharing his expertise with other photographers as well. To that end, his new book aims to help all of us make better portraits, while still providing great behind-the-scenes glimpses into…
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