Iconify Online Portfolio

Are you sick of your digital portfolio not measuring up to the quality of your photos? Tired of having a site that works on the web but not on a mobile phone? Or maybe you just want to finally take full advantage of a tablet's portfolio possibilities? Well you might just want to sign up for the brand new service called Iconify. It looks to be a pretty darn useful app for iPhones, tablets and laptops to create a single, minimally beautiful photo portfolio that works seamlessly across all of these divergent platforms. It's currently in the beta testing phase, so you can sign up now to gain access to the service soon. I've already signed up myself and I'm eagerly awaiting admittance. (Click the link below to sign up for free and you'll help me get in sooner. Then you'll get your own URL to share in an effort; the more referrals you provide, the early you'll gain admittance for yourself. Pretty smart marketing; must be pretty smart folks. That bodes well for Iconify.) I can't wait to get my hands on their software!

http://iconify.co/launch?lrRef=q7iRd
DPMag
Are you sick of your digital portfolio not measuring up to the quality of your photos? Tired of having a site that works on the web but not on a mobile phone? Or maybe you just want to finally take full advantage of a tablet's portfolio possibilities? Well you might…

Lightroom In The Cloud

Earlier this year Adobe announced its Creative Cloud program which lets users opt to pay a monthly fee for access to many of Adobe's most powerful digital imaging applications—namely, Photoshop CS6—rather than shelling out larger sums to buy individual applications periodically. Creative Cloud users pay a monthly subscription fee in order to download fully functional versions of their favorite Adobe software. Until last week, though, one notable program was missing from the Creative Cloud. That's been remedied now with the addition of Lightroom 4 to the service. As the linchpin in my own digital workflow—and I'm sure that of many other photographers—Lightroom's inclusion in the Creative Cloud makes the prospect of signing up much more appealing. And if you use several Adobe programs such as Illustrator, Dreamweaver and Premier, it's practically a no brainer.

http://www.adobe.com/products/creativecloud.html
DPMag
Earlier this year Adobe announced its Creative Cloud program which lets users opt to pay a monthly fee for access to many of Adobe's most powerful digital imaging applications—namely, Photoshop CS6—rather than shelling out larger sums to buy individual applications periodically. Creative Cloud users pay a monthly subscription fee in…

Get Paid For Your Photos And Videos

New service Paya is creating a worldwide index of licensable content. That means you can take your photos and videos (that now sit idly on sites like Vimeo, YouTube, Facebook and Flickr, collecting likes that—while nice—don't pay the rent) and tag them with a "click here to license" button to easily turn that content into profit. Better yet, Paya gives you, the photographer, 80% of the fee. Targeted at amateurs interested in making a few extra bucks as well as professionals who want to fight the ever increasing trend of shrinking returns, the site just might have some traction if it can recruit lots of photographers to index their work through the Paya service. I'm going to give it a shot; I hope you do too.

http://www.paya.com
DPMag
New service Paya is creating a worldwide index of licensable content. That means you can take your photos and videos (that now sit idly on sites like Vimeo, YouTube, Facebook and Flickr, collecting likes that—while nice—don't pay the rent) and tag them with a "click here to license" button to…

Fiber Optic Flash Trigger

Normally when I think about do-it-yourself photo hacks I think of fairly low-tech tools, not fiber optics. But this homemade "wireless" flash trigger actually uses a combination of low tech (tape and cardboard) and high tech (fiber optic cable) to allow you to sync your strobes to cameras that don't have PC connections or hot shoes. By taping the fiber optic cable to a pop up flash on a camera, and the other end to any handheld flash with an optical slave, you can circumvent the camera's lack of flash connectivity by sending a pulse of light from the pop-up flash through the fiber optics and into the optical slave to trigger the off-camera flash. Plus, you can run over long distances this way too. It's not truly wireless, but it's pretty dang neat. Why didn't I think of that? (I should write a book about great photo ideas called, "Why didn't I think of that?") Kudos to the savvy photographer who goes by the moniker "Fiberstrobe" for developing this homemade workaround. Read all about it at http://www.diyphotography.net/using-fiber-optics-instead-of-pc-sync.
DPMag
Normally when I think about do-it-yourself photo hacks I think of fairly low-tech tools, not fiber optics. But this homemade "wireless" flash trigger actually uses a combination of low tech (tape and cardboard) and high tech (fiber optic cable) to allow you to sync your strobes to cameras that don't…

Two Portrait Photographers Prime For Emulation

Today I'm bringing you not one but two interviews with world class portrait photographers. Rather than just plain conversation, though, each of these is more of an in-depth lesson in the making of masterful portraits. The first, courtesy of the Fast Company Create blog, is Nadav Kander. He's photographed presidents and celebrities, and his portfolio includes images that eventually are almost certain to become iconic. His interview sheds light on technical approach and philosophy, even as he stretches his talents into the world of motion picture portraits—no easy feat. Kander's candor, pardon the pun, is not unlike the second interview, which comes via the A Photo Editor blog. It's with celebrity portrait photographer Chris Buck, whose images demonstrate a unique sense of humor without being kitschy or campy. They also manage to transcend the world of pedestrian portraiture, making these interviews with two different artists, who take two different approaches, both invaluable lessons for portrait photographers of all stripes. 

http://www.fastcocreate.com/1680903/master-class-how-to-create-an-unforgettable-portrait#1
http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/06/18/chris-buck-the-surprising-portrait
DPMag
Today I'm bringing you not one but two interviews with world class portrait photographers. Rather than just plain conversation, though, each of these is more of an in-depth lesson in the making of masterful portraits. The first, courtesy of the Fast Company Create blog, is Nadav Kander. He's photographed presidents…

Understanding Lighting Ratios

Here's a pretty great post from Darlene Hildebrandt over at the DPS blog. It's all about explaining lighting ratios in simple terms, making them easy to understand and even easier to put into practice. Another way to think about lighting ratios is how the fill light affects the overall feel of a picture—especially in portraits. The relative strength of the fill light—its ratio compared to the key light—tremendously affects the mood of a picture. Too much fill and an image is boring, too little and it can actually be too dramatic. Find the right spot, where the fill light's just right, and you'll create the perfectly appropriate mood for your picture. With an understanding of lighting ratios, you can.

http://digital-photography-school.com/lighting-ratios-to-make-or-break-your-portrait
DPMag
Here's a pretty great post from Darlene Hildebrandt over at the DPS blog. It's all about explaining lighting ratios in simple terms, making them easy to understand and even easier to put into practice. Another way to think about lighting ratios is how the fill light affects the overall feel…
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