Double Photographers, Double Exposures

You might not expect a business blog to be a great resource for creative photography, but in fact Fast Company's design blog is a great place to find all sorts of creative work. To wit, the recent piece on "dueling photographers" who make double exposures on the same roll of film. It's a tremendously creative project, in which two different photographers expose the same roll of film, and serendipitously create gorgeous double exposure photographs. It reminded me of some partner projects I've done with other photographers over the years. Working with another photographer is a great way not only to boost your output, but to get you thinking more creatively as well. Whether that's giving each other weekly self-assignments, offering open and honest critiques of one another's work, or swapping a roll of film on which both of you will shoot. There's lots of value in working with another photographer to improve your own photography. 

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670891/dueling-photogs-share-the-same-roll-of-film#3
DPMag
You might not expect a business blog to be a great resource for creative photography, but in fact Fast Company's design blog is a great place to find all sorts of creative work. To wit, the recent piece on "dueling photographers" who make double exposures on the same roll of…

Stunningly Beautiful And Creative Landscape Photos

This is both beautiful and brilliant. No, I'm not talking about myself (although I do confess I am a gorgeous genius), I'm talking about these photographs of Joshua Tree National Park by the apparently genius photographer Daniel Kukla. He places large mirrors on easels, strategically located to produce reflections of stunning desert landscapes, and then he photographs the whole rig. It's very meta, very smart, and very beautiful. And it's "about" photography in a way that I just find to be absolutely irresistible.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/10/mirrors-on-easels-create-the-illusion-of-desert-landscape-paintings-in-californias-joshua-tree-national-park
DPMag
This is both beautiful and brilliant. No, I'm not talking about myself (although I do confess I am a gorgeous genius), I'm talking about these photographs of Joshua Tree National Park by the apparently genius photographer Daniel Kukla. He places large mirrors on easels, strategically located to produce reflections of…

Video ISO Advice

Here's an interesting little factoid I stumbled across the other day: Did you know that there's an ideal ISO at which to shoot video on a Canon EOS 5D camera? The information came courtesy of Vincent Laforet (who is known for being a DSLR video expert) who blogged this quite a while ago, but I guess I'm late to the game on this one. Anyway, here it is: when shooting video on the 5D Mark 2 or Mark 3, be sure to set the ISO to multiples of 160—such as 160, 320, 640, and so on. This is because of the native ISO of the cameras' sensors, and in practice it means the cameras can actually produce cleaner, lower-noise video files at ISO 320 than it can at ISO 200, better looking files at ISO 640 than at ISO 400. It's a pretty remarkable accomplishment when you think about it. So if you shoot one of these cameras, try those multiples and see what you think. If you're not a 5D video shooter, do a bit of testing of your own camera to determine your own camera's ISO sweet spot. And if you're interesting in learning more about D-SLR video—or video in general, for that matter—Laforet's blog is a great place to start.

http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/2011/04/29/technicolor-cinestyle-profile-available-for-canon-5dmkii/
DPMag
Here's an interesting little factoid I stumbled across the other day: Did you know that there's an ideal ISO at which to shoot video on a Canon EOS 5D camera? The information came courtesy of Vincent Laforet (who is known for being a DSLR video expert) who blogged this quite…

Stock Photography As Comedy

Stock photography can be weird. There, I said it. Sometimes we see these uber-specific stock photos and wonder who in their right mind thought this was something that needed to be shot? Turns out the folks at CollegeHumor have also noted this trend and created a video with actor Patrick Wilson satirizing the ridiculousness of this stock photography trend. It's good for a quick laugh if you've got a few minutes to spare. You can watch Wilson portray a beekeeper giving a bear a piggy back ride in the forest--and other stupidly specific stock photo scenarios.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/is-stock-imagery-getting-too-specific
DPMag
Stock photography can be weird. There, I said it. Sometimes we see these uber-specific stock photos and wonder who in their right mind thought this was something that needed to be shot? Turns out the folks at CollegeHumor have also noted this trend and created a video with actor Patrick…

Secrets Of Great Portrait Photography

Tremendously talented portrait photographer Brian Smith has a new book is out this week, and it should be on the top of pretty much every photographer's wish list. The book, Secrets of Great Portrait Photography, breaks down decades of insights and advice from Smith--a true master portraitist--into reliable, relatable and increadibly invaluable information for photographers striving to make better pictures of people. Including behind-the-scenes stories of the making of many of his most iconic portraits, it's really a great book that works on two levels: not only is it a beautiful coffee table book of photography, it serves as an instruction manual for up-and-coming portrait photographers. It might just be a must-read.

http://briansmith.com/secrets-of-great-portrait-photography-brian-smith
DPMag
Tremendously talented portrait photographer Brian Smith has a new book is out this week, and it should be on the top of pretty much every photographer's wish list. The book, Secrets of Great Portrait Photography, breaks down decades of insights and advice from Smith--a true master portraitist--into reliable, relatable and…

Down And Out In The South

This is a tremendous portrait project with a poignant social message. So often, homeless people are treated as less than human, ignored both in theory and in reality by society as a whole. So when Dutch photographer Jan Banning took a residency at the 701 Center for Creative Art in Columbia, South Carolina, the socially minded photographer decided to set up a makeshift studio in a housing facility for aid of the homeless, and he made beautiful, dignified portraits of these people without preying on them. It's certainly a well covered subject, but Banning's approach is definitely unique. The result is a lesson not only in beautiful portraiture, but also a lesson in how to treat subjects with dignity and photograph to serve a greater purpose.

http://cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/03/down-and-out-in-the-south
DPMag
This is a tremendous portrait project with a poignant social message. So often, homeless people are treated as less than human, ignored both in theory and in reality by society as a whole. So when Dutch photographer Jan Banning took a residency at the 701 Center for Creative Art in…
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