Photographing Stars Of The Non-Celebrity Kind

Here's a great guide that's sure to be a godsend for many photographers who like to work after dark. It's Phil Hart's eBook called "Shooting Stars," which isn't about paparazzi photography but rather about photographing the night sky. Filled with information on equipment, technique and artistic vision, Hart's guide is 140 pages covering everything you need to know about photographing stars, from the necessary equipment (like tripods, bubble levels, filters and flashlights) to the best techniques for making beautiful motion blur shots of star trails or tack sharp images that allow you to explore the milky way. The digital download can be had for the low price of only $25. Check out this detailed review at the Pixiq site, then head over to Hart's site to purchase your own copy.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/shooting-stars-a-guide-to-shoot-the-moon-and-stars
http://www.philhart.com/shooting-stars
DPMag
Here's a great guide that's sure to be a godsend for many photographers who like to work after dark. It's Phil Hart's eBook called "Shooting Stars," which isn't about paparazzi photography but rather about photographing the night sky. Filled with information on equipment, technique and artistic vision, Hart's guide is…

A Filmless Kodak

It's hard to imagine a time when film and paper icon Kodak will stop making photographic film and paper altogether. While I think many of us assumed it would slow to a trickle years before the official "end" of such production (well, at least I assumed that), it turns out it's going to be a lot more like the flipping of a switch that stops the flow of film and paper out of Rochester. Last week Kodak announced plans to sell off its film and photo paper businesses, which would mean the company will focus primarily on its industrial businesses (i.e. government contracts) and consumer inkjet technologies. A bigger question, perhaps, is who on earth might buy this type of business? Sure there's still demand, but it's clearly a shrinking proposition. How could a competitor purchase a business for what it's valued at today if it's clearly understood that it will be worth significantly less with every passing day? It will be interesting to see if Kodak can find a buyer, and who that buyer might be. A former competitor in the film and paper markets, perhaps? Or maybe a digital imaging company looking for an entree into this particular (shrinking) photographic niche? Either way, as long as some one picks up the torch to carry on, I'll be happy. Though it's still tough to see Kodak transformed into a shell of its once dominant self.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2012/08/kodak-to-sell-film-and-paper-business.html
DPMag
It's hard to imagine a time when film and paper icon Kodak will stop making photographic film and paper altogether. While I think many of us assumed it would slow to a trickle years before the official "end" of such production (well, at least I assumed that), it turns out…

An Android-Powered Camera

Normally I don't blog about new product announcements, but this one is notable in an pretty unique way. It's another story of the convergence of cell phone technology and digital cameras. But in this case, it's not another smart phone that's designed to take great pictures. In fact it's a point-and-shoot camera that's got a smartphone's Android operating system built in. It's the new Nikon Coolpix S800c, a compact camera that captures 16-megapixel stills and full HD video, and allows you to easily share them via wi-fi to upload them straight to the web. This makes sharing online with this camera just as easy as it is with a smartphone. Even more, it includes typical smartphone capabilities like email, gps positioning and more thanks to apps downloaded from the Google Play store. It's the first of something pretty unique, and I'm guessing this won't be the last of its breed.

http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Products/Product/Compact-Digital-Cameras/26356/COOLPIX-S800c.html
DPMag
Normally I don't blog about new product announcements, but this one is notable in an pretty unique way. It's another story of the convergence of cell phone technology and digital cameras. But in this case, it's not another smart phone that's designed to take great pictures. In fact it's a…

Shooting Day For Night

I love old westerns from the 1970s. Those movies are a guilty pleasure for an afternoon on the couch or a late night "work" session. One of my favorite techniques from many of those westerns is the "day for night" shooting trick. By photographing a scene in the middle of the day, but dramatically underexposing and shifting the tones to blue (presumably via the use of a filter or a processing adjustment) suddenly the good guys are outrunning the bad guys under the light of a full moon—not under a harsh midday sun. So this video by Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens, about turning daylight into moonlight with a few simple tricks, really strikes a chord with me. Maybe I'll make my own westerns now? Or maybe I'll just put it to use as a way to understand illuminating subject and background separately by controlling ambient and flash exposures independently in the same scene. It's powerful stuff if you really want to be the kind of photographer who takes control of lighting, rather than the kind who just takes what he can get.

http://www.silberstudios.tv/blog/2012/08/turn-sunshine-into-moon-shine-all-in-camera/
DPMag
I love old westerns from the 1970s. Those movies are a guilty pleasure for an afternoon on the couch or a late night "work" session. One of my favorite techniques from many of those westerns is the "day for night" shooting trick. By photographing a scene in the middle of…

An Immersive Martian Panorama Photograph

Last week I mentioned a few of my favorite Mars rover links. If only this one had been available at the time! It's an interactive 360-degree panorama of the Curiosity rover's Martian landing site. And it's so unbelievably great! It provides a different way of experiencing the red planet, heightening that feeling of "you're really there" in a way that no amount of still photos can quite accomplish. I can only imagine that once we start seeing actual video from the planet that the feeling will be even more heightened. It's yet another reminder of what an amazing technological age in which we're living.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/08/an-interactive-360-panorama-of-curiositys-landing-site-on-mars/
DPMag
Last week I mentioned a few of my favorite Mars rover links. If only this one had been available at the time! It's an interactive 360-degree panorama of the Curiosity rover's Martian landing site. And it's so unbelievably great! It provides a different way of experiencing the red planet, heightening…

Photography Is Not A Crime

I've been reading a lot lately about the increasing criminalization of photography.
By William Sawalich
I've been reading a lot lately about the increasing criminalization of photography. It seems that more and more photographers are stopped by police officers all over the country for doing nothing more than photographing on public property. And many photographers, it seems, do not understand their rights: we have the…
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