Lightroom 4 Speedy Workaround

I was recently shooting all sorts of portraits—like, thousands of exposures—over the course of three days for a great client who was leaving town immediately following wrap on the third day. The client wanted to take low-resolution proof JPEGs with them, and so I set Lightroom 4 to processing the first set of 1200 raw files. It took just short of forever. So I started Googling and found a tip in a Lightroom forum—a great tip, in fact, that saved the day. If you break a single batch process of say 1000 images exporting into three batches of 333 simultaneously exporting, they will export significantly FASTER in total. Like 25 to 30 percent faster. It's because Lightroom 4 is built to not use up all of a computer's processing power during import and export—meaning it can do multiple batches faster than a single one. Here's an article at CNet that explains the particulars of how and why this happens, but trust me—it works!

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13580_3-10287142-39.html
DPMag
I was recently shooting all sorts of portraits—like, thousands of exposures—over the course of three days for a great client who was leaving town immediately following wrap on the third day. The client wanted to take low-resolution proof JPEGs with them, and so I set Lightroom 4 to processing the…

Capture TV

How did I let three episodes of this Internet TV show slip by? I've just learned about Capture, the interview show in which renowned portrait photographer Mark Seliger invites a photographer and a celebrity photo buff into his studio to discuss photography. This episode features Kevin Bacon, quite the serious amateur photographer, and Bob Gruen, rock 'n roll photographer most famous for his iconic portraits of John Lennon. It's great fun, and interesting, and always nice to hear fellow photographers discuss their passion. Thanks to A Photo Editor for the heads up!

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/10/29/capture-episode-4-bob-gruen-and-kevin-bacon-with-mark-seliger/
DPMag
How did I let three episodes of this Internet TV show slip by? I've just learned about Capture, the interview show in which renowned portrait photographer Mark Seliger invites a photographer and a celebrity photo buff into his studio to discuss photography. This episode features Kevin Bacon, quite the serious…

Corporate Portrait BTS Video

Corporate portraits are a pretty common assignment for commercial photographers. In fact, I do them myself on a pretty regular basis. This video from Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens shows a textbook approach to a corporate portrait assignment. A few differences I'll mention, compared to how I like to do it. First, I prefer a seated subject for a headshot. I think it makes for a nicer, more formal portrait. The tradeoff is that a larger subject may tend to look heavier when seated, so for those instances I'll have them stand. Second, I like a more symmetrical background light; rather than placing it off to the side, I prefer the background light centered behind the subject—often from a floor stand below the frame. And third, and maybe most important, I always—and I mean ALWAYS—use a lens hood. Those first two are personal preferences, but I consider a lens hood practically mandatory in this situation—especially if you'll be shooting directly toward that hairlight in the background. Aside from my little tweaks, this video is really great, and a must-see for anyone wondering how to approach this type of corporate portrait assignment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/09/watch-this-jay-p-morgans-corporate.html
DPMag
Corporate portraits are a pretty common assignment for commercial photographers. In fact, I do them myself on a pretty regular basis. This video from Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens shows a textbook approach to a corporate portrait assignment. A few differences I'll mention, compared to how I like…

Photoshop Setup Tips

It's the simplest photography tips that I find have the most staying power. And so this collection of five simple Photoshop setup tips has the potential to be life changing. Covering everything from how files are opened to where they're saved, and a few crucial settings for in between, Helen Bradley (Photoshop and Lightroom tutorial EXPERT, I should point out) really nails it here at the DPS blog. I've just gone through this list to be sure that Photoshop is optimized to perform exactly how I'd like it to. You should do the same.

http://digital-photography-school.com/5-photoshop-setup-tips
DPMag
It's the simplest photography tips that I find have the most staying power. And so this collection of five simple Photoshop setup tips has the potential to be life changing. Covering everything from how files are opened to where they're saved, and a few crucial settings for in between, Helen…

Behind The Scenes With Annie Liebovitz And Rihanna

Commercial photographers make behind the scenes videos—especially the famous ones. Then the rest of us watch those videos to learn not only how to interact with a celebrity subject, but also how to light when you're shooting, say, a cover of Vogue magazine. Well superstar photographer Annie Liebovitz recently had a behind the scenes Vogue cover shoot with pop star Rihanna given the annotation treatment by David Hobby at his Strobist blog. When he does these annotations, Hobby watches BTS videos and points out important things for us photographers to pay attention to during videos. It's kind of like a DVD commentary track in print. Good stuff, definitely—both to see how amazing Annie's approach is, and how simply and beautifully she makes great photographs. Let the haters hate; That is one super-talented photographer.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/10/annie-tated-video-leibovitz-shoots.html
DPMag
Commercial photographers make behind the scenes videos—especially the famous ones. Then the rest of us watch those videos to learn not only how to interact with a celebrity subject, but also how to light when you're shooting, say, a cover of Vogue magazine. Well superstar photographer Annie Liebovitz recently had…

Abraham Lincoln In Color

No, it's not some rare technological marvel that's been recently unearthed. These photographs of President Lincoln have been colorized digitally by artist Sanna Dullaway, who was commissioned by Time magazine for the project. It's amazing how removing the abstraction of black & white entirely changes the feel of these photographs. Abraham Lincoln seems somehow more relatable, more human, more real. And I suppose that was the point—humanizing the man who was perhaps our most collectively beloved president. I've mentioned Ms. Dullaway's work before on this blog, but this project really is a cut above. Check it out at the Time Lightbox photo blog.

http://lightbox.time.com/2012/10/25/a-vibrant-past-colorizing-the-archives-of-history/#11
DPMag
No, it's not some rare technological marvel that's been recently unearthed. These photographs of President Lincoln have been colorized digitally by artist Sanna Dullaway, who was commissioned by Time magazine for the project. It's amazing how removing the abstraction of black & white entirely changes the feel of these photographs.…
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