A Must-See NPR Picture Show

This is a pretty amazing photographic experience courtesy of NPR. It's the discovery of lost photographs by Charles Cushman, a hobbyist photographer who started photographing in the 1930s and continued shooting for more than 30 years. The bulk of his archive of almost 15,000 images is housed at Indiana University, and these missing photos—found by photo historian Rich Remsberg in boxes destined for the dumpster—had been separated from the larger collection. What's most unique about the images, perhaps, is that they depict America in color in an era we're generally only used to seeing in black & white. The NPR multimedia presentation makes wonderful use of audio narration to tell this tremendous story; it's a wonderful way to use the web to share photographs and tell stories, and I hope we start to see many more presentations like it.

http://www.npr.org/news/specials/2012/cushman
DPMag
This is a pretty amazing photographic experience courtesy of NPR. It's the discovery of lost photographs by Charles Cushman, a hobbyist photographer who started photographing in the 1930s and continued shooting for more than 30 years. The bulk of his archive of almost 15,000 images is housed at Indiana University,…

Frank Lloyd Wright's Photographer

I'm no architecture expert, but I know enough to get me in trouble. And I thought I knew about all of the architectural photographers I should have known, but I was unfortunately unaware of the work of photographer Pedro Guerrero until I learned of his recent passing. It seems that Mr. Guerrero was the unofficial photographer of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. "He told me I should remember he designed his houses from a sitting position," Mr. Guerrero was quoted in The New York Times earlier this year. "He was only three or four inches taller than I was, and he didn't want bird's-eye views or worm's-eye views. He wanted me to photograph a house that he would recognize as being his." After Wright's death, Mr. Guerrero worked extensively with other world-renowned artists and architects such as Alexander Calder and Philip Johnson, and he continued to produce beautiful photographs of art and architecture that are sure to serve as fitting memorials to the artists who made them, as well for the photographer himself. To see more of Mr. Guerrero's work, visit his web site at http://www.guerrerophoto.com, then be sure to read more about his life at the New York Times. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/14/arts/design/pedro-guerrero-95-dies-captured-another-dimension-of-art.html
DPMag
I'm no architecture expert, but I know enough to get me in trouble. And I thought I knew about all of the architectural photographers I should have known, but I was unfortunately unaware of the work of photographer Pedro Guerrero until I learned of his recent passing. It seems that…

The Return Of The Deardorff

I've always wanted a Deardorff large format view camera. They really are beautiful wood and brass works of art that can be put to use to help you make your own beautiful works of photographic art. For the better part of a century, they were the standard bearer for all serious professional photographers--including Ansel, Yousef and Avedon--but the company closed up shop in 1988, leaving purchasers of Deardorff cameras to fight over the remaining cameras that appear on the secondary market. Until now. A new group of owners purchased the company in 2009, gained the rights to the Deardorff trademark in 2010, and now they've started production once again in their Tennessee factory. So if you're in the market for a 4x5 or 8x10 view camera, you no longer have to search eBay and Craigslist in hopes of finding a vintage Deardorff; you can purchase a brand new camera straight from the company itself. 

http://www.pixiq.com/article/the-deardorff-is-back
DPMag
I've always wanted a Deardorff large format view camera. They really are beautiful wood and brass works of art that can be put to use to help you make your own beautiful works of photographic art. For the better part of a century, they were the standard bearer for all…

Back Button Focusing

Do you know about back button focusing? It's the method of focusing your camera (via autofocus, of course) that relies not on pressing the shutter button halfway with your index finger, but rather pressing a button on the back of the camera with your thumb. It doesn't seem like that big of a deal, but photographers who use the technique tend to sing its praises very loudly. Here's an article from James Brandon--author of an ebook all about achieving perfect focus--that advocates switching to back button focus at all times, and provides a few good reasons for re-learning this fundamental photographic technique.

http://digital-photography-school.com/back-button-focus
DPMag
Do you know about back button focusing? It's the method of focusing your camera (via autofocus, of course) that relies not on pressing the shutter button halfway with your index finger, but rather pressing a button on the back of the camera with your thumb. It doesn't seem like that…

Sun Flare Photography

I've long used this blog to demonstrate my appreciation for NASA's astrophotography. But they've outdone themselves this time, with some really crazy detailed photos of the sun. I know, it sounds like a bit of an oxymoron, but apparently if you've got a small enough aperture and a short enough shutter speed… Well, you can actually see amazing detail in the surface of the bright ball of gas we know as the sun. So first I recommend you check out these stills of the sun via a blog called But Does It Float. Then I recommend you check out the Flickr feed from NASA that inspired the post, because while you may notice a massive CME (coronial mass ejection) in one of the stills, they've got video of the thing on the Flickr feed. And it is, basically, a ridiculously cool event. I love when photography takes us places we could never even comprehend otherwise. This is a perfect example. Science!

http://butdoesitfloat.com/Who-Loves-the-Sun
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/7938936660/in/set-72157631408160534
DPMag
I've long used this blog to demonstrate my appreciation for NASA's astrophotography. But they've outdone themselves this time, with some really crazy detailed photos of the sun. I know, it sounds like a bit of an oxymoron, but apparently if you've got a small enough aperture and a short enough…

Sammon On Subtle HDR

As someone who finds himself physically nauseated by most over-the-top HDR photography—with its syrupy colors and coarse textures—I'm a big proponent of the technology being put to use for more subtle image making. So I was thrilled to see that nature photographer Rick Sammon recently created this post at DP Review showcasing how "the rest of us" can use HDR to more realistic, more subtle, less obnoxious effect. The capability to combine multiple exposures for the simple benefit of enhanced tonal range is one of the best uses of HDR—the kind of use where you hardly know the technique has been applied.

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/1944596440/hdr-for-the-rest-of-us
DPMag
As someone who finds himself physically nauseated by most over-the-top HDR photography—with its syrupy colors and coarse textures—I'm a big proponent of the technology being put to use for more subtle image making. So I was thrilled to see that nature photographer Rick Sammon recently created this post at DP…
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