Picturing Sandy's Aftermath

Hurricane Sandy was obviously a huge disaster that people in the Northeast are fighting their way out of. But even now, almost two weeks after the hurricane wreaked havoc on one of the most populous areas of the country, I don't feel like I have a real understanding of the damage. That changed, though, when a friend linked to the Big Picture blog from Boston.com, which always does a great job curating news photography. And it was through this site and its photographs that I felt like I started to gain a real, meaningful understanding of the damage—and the plight of the people forced to deal with it firsthand.

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2012/10/hurricane_sandy_the_superstorm.html
DPMag
Hurricane Sandy was obviously a huge disaster that people in the Northeast are fighting their way out of. But even now, almost two weeks after the hurricane wreaked havoc on one of the most populous areas of the country, I don't feel like I have a real understanding of the…

A Look Inside The Internet

It really is a series of tubes! The Internet, that is. And I've confirmed this because Google recently released the first-ever photos from inside one of its massive data centers. As the Colossal blog put it, "This is where the internet lives." Not only is it cool to get a glimpse inside the innermost workings of the Google machine, the photographs themselves are pretty stellar. The photographer is Connie Zhou, and she's definitely done justice to this tremendous and unique subject. It's a must see.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/10/where-the-internet-lives-the-first-ever-glimpse-inside-googles-data-centers/
DPMag
It really is a series of tubes! The Internet, that is. And I've confirmed this because Google recently released the first-ever photos from inside one of its massive data centers. As the Colossal blog put it, "This is where the internet lives." Not only is it cool to get a…

Getting Beyond ETTR

You've heard for years about ETTR (expose to the right) meaning to slightly overexpose digital files for maximum image detail and quality. And recently you may have heard more about doing the opposite—underexposing to maximize detail and image quality. Well this article by John Paul Caponigro at our sister publication, Digital Photo Pro, will help you understand exactly what's what when it comes to exposing digital image files for maximum quality. It's not that ETTR is wrong, it's just that it's not always right. Here's how to tell the difference.

http://www.digitalphotopro.com/technique/revolution/beyond-ettr-and-hdr.html
DPMag
You've heard for years about ETTR (expose to the right) meaning to slightly overexpose digital files for maximum image detail and quality. And recently you may have heard more about doing the opposite—underexposing to maximize detail and image quality. Well this article by John Paul Caponigro at our sister publication,…

Lightroom 4 Speedy Workaround

I was recently shooting all sorts of portraits—like, thousands of exposures—over the course of three days for a great client who was leaving town immediately following wrap on the third day. The client wanted to take low-resolution proof JPEGs with them, and so I set Lightroom 4 to processing the first set of 1200 raw files. It took just short of forever. So I started Googling and found a tip in a Lightroom forum—a great tip, in fact, that saved the day. If you break a single batch process of say 1000 images exporting into three batches of 333 simultaneously exporting, they will export significantly FASTER in total. Like 25 to 30 percent faster. It's because Lightroom 4 is built to not use up all of a computer's processing power during import and export—meaning it can do multiple batches faster than a single one. Here's an article at CNet that explains the particulars of how and why this happens, but trust me—it works!

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13580_3-10287142-39.html
DPMag
I was recently shooting all sorts of portraits—like, thousands of exposures—over the course of three days for a great client who was leaving town immediately following wrap on the third day. The client wanted to take low-resolution proof JPEGs with them, and so I set Lightroom 4 to processing the…

Capture TV

How did I let three episodes of this Internet TV show slip by? I've just learned about Capture, the interview show in which renowned portrait photographer Mark Seliger invites a photographer and a celebrity photo buff into his studio to discuss photography. This episode features Kevin Bacon, quite the serious amateur photographer, and Bob Gruen, rock 'n roll photographer most famous for his iconic portraits of John Lennon. It's great fun, and interesting, and always nice to hear fellow photographers discuss their passion. Thanks to A Photo Editor for the heads up!

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/10/29/capture-episode-4-bob-gruen-and-kevin-bacon-with-mark-seliger/
DPMag
How did I let three episodes of this Internet TV show slip by? I've just learned about Capture, the interview show in which renowned portrait photographer Mark Seliger invites a photographer and a celebrity photo buff into his studio to discuss photography. This episode features Kevin Bacon, quite the serious…

Corporate Portrait BTS Video

Corporate portraits are a pretty common assignment for commercial photographers. In fact, I do them myself on a pretty regular basis. This video from Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens shows a textbook approach to a corporate portrait assignment. A few differences I'll mention, compared to how I like to do it. First, I prefer a seated subject for a headshot. I think it makes for a nicer, more formal portrait. The tradeoff is that a larger subject may tend to look heavier when seated, so for those instances I'll have them stand. Second, I like a more symmetrical background light; rather than placing it off to the side, I prefer the background light centered behind the subject—often from a floor stand below the frame. And third, and maybe most important, I always—and I mean ALWAYS—use a lens hood. Those first two are personal preferences, but I consider a lens hood practically mandatory in this situation—especially if you'll be shooting directly toward that hairlight in the background. Aside from my little tweaks, this video is really great, and a must-see for anyone wondering how to approach this type of corporate portrait assignment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/09/watch-this-jay-p-morgans-corporate.html
DPMag
Corporate portraits are a pretty common assignment for commercial photographers. In fact, I do them myself on a pretty regular basis. This video from Jay P. Morgan of the Slanted Lens shows a textbook approach to a corporate portrait assignment. A few differences I'll mention, compared to how I like…
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