Sunsrise, Sunset... What's The Difference?

Did you know there's a difference between "dawn" and "sunrise"? Or that "sunset" and "dusk" are not the same thing? This never occurred to me until recently when a photographer friend, well versed in photographing architecture at the edges of the day, pointed out to me that I was using the terms interchangeably, but that I should not. Dawn is the time when light first starts appearing in the sky, whereas sunrise is when the sun itself becomes visible. The reverse is true at the end of the day: sunset encompasses the last moments of visible sun in the sky before it dips below the horizon, and dusk is the time after the sun has disappeared when there's still plenty of glowing light in the sky. The difference between these times, as you can imagine, is dramatic. When the sun is still visible in the sky the light is strong and directional and usually golden and warm. Beautiful light, no doubt. But after the sun has disappeared, the light becomes soft and non-directional, and the whole attitude of a scene changes significantly. To that end, Anne McKinnell has written about her favorite techniques for photographing during dusk, in the twilight, when all the other photographers have gone home. Check out her suggestions for tips and techniques that apply equally, in my opinion, for working at dawn as well.

http://digital-photography-school.com/shooting-in-the-twilight-zone
DPMag
Did you know there's a difference between "dawn" and "sunrise"? Or that "sunset" and "dusk" are not the same thing? This never occurred to me until recently when a photographer friend, well versed in photographing architecture at the edges of the day, pointed out to me that I was using…

The Field Studio

Aha! As someone who spends a lot of time lurking around in the photoblogosphere, this new book comes as somewhat of a surprise. It's not something I've seen explained before in much detail; not necessarily a hip, hot topic, but one that can teach you a whole lot about creating fine photographs. It's how to photograph nature on a pure white background, as manifested by the super-talented nature photographer Niall Benvie. Niall's new book, The Field Studio, is perfect if you're interested in photographing nature with a different twist, whether that's in your studio or homemade stand-in. Better still, this book is sure to lend much assistance to anyone who wants to learn about photographing still lifes in the studio, or photographing almost any subject on a white background for that matter. The best photo insights, I find, are the ones that translate across disciplines. And in learning something so specific as photographing nature in the studio, one will surely learn a lot about photography in the broader sense. It looks like a good volume to add to your library.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/the-field-studio-new-ebook
DPMag
Aha! As someone who spends a lot of time lurking around in the photoblogosphere, this new book comes as somewhat of a surprise. It's not something I've seen explained before in much detail; not necessarily a hip, hot topic, but one that can teach you a whole lot about creating…

Camera Buying Guides

Care to improve your camera-buying prowess? Browse one of superstore Adorama's 65 free buying guides online to help you hone in on the perfect camera and lens for your next purchase. Of course, these buying guides are practical way beyond learning just what gear to splurge on. They're helpful for learning about photography too, as they encourage you to consider the methods and techniques that you use, and to learn more about them as you learn what equipment might be most practical for a given way of shooting. The point is, by learning more about gear options, you can learn more about photography. These buying guides are the perfect way to learn more about cameras and techniques—whether you're considering a compact digital camera for family events or a big dSLR for a budding photojournalist. How you shoot determines what you buy, so thinking about what to buy can help you figure out how to shoot. It's a perfect symbiosis!

http://www.adorama.com/alc/category/Buying-Guides
DPMag
Care to improve your camera-buying prowess? Browse one of superstore Adorama's 65 free buying guides online to help you hone in on the perfect camera and lens for your next purchase. Of course, these buying guides are practical way beyond learning just what gear to splurge on. They're helpful for…

Photographing Shadow And Light

The photographer Joey L makes me angry. You see, he's really good. Really, really good. And he's just a kid. Yes, technically he's 21, but when I first learned of his world-class globetrotting work he was only 17. Less than half my age, and more than twice as good! Yes, it's petty jealousy. Joey L (short for Joey Lawrence but in no way the same guy as the 1980s child actor whose catch phrase was "whoa") is a ridiculously talented and successful photographer. By any measure, he's enviable for 99% of photographers in the world. Bottom line, he's just really, really good. And now he's got a new book, Photographing Shadow and Light, as well as a LONG 43-minute documentary video online. And I think all of us, from Strobist's David Hobby to any other kids out there who have just picked up their first camera, can benefit from spending a little time learning from Joey L.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/12/new-book-doc-from-joey-l-are-both.html
DPMag
The photographer Joey L makes me angry. You see, he's really good. Really, really good. And he's just a kid. Yes, technically he's 21, but when I first learned of his world-class globetrotting work he was only 17. Less than half my age, and more than twice as good! Yes,…

Chuck Close On Creativity

The next few words I'm going to write will sound like blasphemy to some photographers, but I'm going to write them anyway. Here goes: It seems to me that the best photographs are as much about ideas as they are about execution. By that I mean, it's the content that matters most. It can be all too easy to get caught up in the trappings of technique and equipment—and let's face it, it can also be downright fun. But to a certain extent, all of these things can get in the way of what we photographers are supposed to be doing: making pictures. I have been kicking around this idea for a long while now, but it was only when reading a recent post at the wonderful Brain Pickings blog that I read some quotes from the painter Chuck Close that really galvanized these thoughts for me. Close puts it simply: "Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work." I think that translates for photographers into something along the lines of, "Let's not worry so much about how, and let's just concentrate on doing." As Nike's ad agency so beautifully put it, "Just do it." Work begets work, creating leads to creativity. So the next time you're feeling like something—anything—is getting in the way of making photographs, forget it. And just get to work. (For more from the Chuck Close interview, as well as conversations with many other phenomenal artists, follow the link to Brain Pickings where you can pick up the book from which Close's quotes came: Inside the Painter's Studio, by Joe Fig. Looks like a wonderful and inspirational read, even for us photographers.)

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/12/27/chuck-close-on-creativity/
DPMag
The next few words I'm going to write will sound like blasphemy to some photographers, but I'm going to write them anyway. Here goes: It seems to me that the best photographs are as much about ideas as they are about execution. By that I mean, it's the content that…

Stop Action Fashion Edit Animation

This is a neat video of photographer Kwaku Alston editing the take from a recent fashion shoot with actress Drew Barrymore. Alston isn't retouching here, he's editing to decide which ones he likes the best. And heck, let's be clear: I doubt he edits them this way in reality. But the stop action animation effect is great, and it's a wonderful way to showcase a great bunch of photos from what certainly appears to be a successful, high-energy shoot. There's also a great behind the scenes video, and more information about the Drew Barrymore project on the page. Oh, and thanks to the ever-outstanding Feature Shoot blog for pointing us to this clip.

http://artofstudio.com/the-drew-barrymore-project-11318
DPMag
This is a neat video of photographer Kwaku Alston editing the take from a recent fashion shoot with actress Drew Barrymore. Alston isn't retouching here, he's editing to decide which ones he likes the best. And heck, let's be clear: I doubt he edits them this way in reality. But…
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