Wired's Favorite Viral Photos Of The Year

I can't believe I almost forgot about one of my favorite things that happens this time of year. It's time for the annual flood of "best of" lists. These lists can comprise anything and everything, and you're sure to find them all over the place. But this one I'm linking to today is a good way to get started because it doesn't take itself too seriously; It's a bit of light fun. It's a collection of Wired's favorite viral photography projects of the year, of which I've seen almost all. But the little bent things... That was news to me. The year's best really are in here, from the underwater dogs to the haunted house photos. I love that last one the best, I think. And if you haven't seen it, you must. 

http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2012/11/wireds-favorite-viral-photo-projects-of-2012/
DPMag
I can't believe I almost forgot about one of my favorite things that happens this time of year. It's time for the annual flood of "best of" lists. These lists can comprise anything and everything, and you're sure to find them all over the place. But this one I'm linking…

A Glimpse At Nat Geo's Frontrunner Contest Photos

Every year, National Geographic hosts a photography contest. Well the submissions for this year's contest are now in, and while we wait for the votes to be tabulated the fine folks at National Geographic have shared a selection of their favorite entries. One of the most fun and interesting accompaniments to these tremendous photographs is the captions, unfiltered and unvarnished and provided by the photographers themselves. These amazing photographs deserve to be seen, even if they don't end up winning the contest in the end.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/11/spectacular-entries-to-the-2012-national-geographic-photography-contest
DPMag
Every year, National Geographic hosts a photography contest. Well the submissions for this year's contest are now in, and while we wait for the votes to be tabulated the fine folks at National Geographic have shared a selection of their favorite entries. One of the most fun and interesting accompaniments…

A Look At An Amazing Photographer

The online photographer, Michael Johnston, always has great content on his photo blog. Still, he sometimes manages to surprise me—as he just did by linking to the work of a photographer I've never heard of, but who is clearly a master of documentary photography. Gueorgui Pinkhassov is a Russian photographer and a member of Magnum—so you know he truly is a world-class photographer. His photographs have a timeless quality, much the same way as many of my favorite Magnum photographers such as Steve McCurry, Alec Soth and—dare I say it, even the man himself—Henri Cartier-Bresson.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2012/11/random-excellence-gueorgui-pinkhassov.html
DPMag
The online photographer, Michael Johnston, always has great content on his photo blog. Still, he sometimes manages to surprise me—as he just did by linking to the work of a photographer I've never heard of, but who is clearly a master of documentary photography. Gueorgui Pinkhassov is a Russian photographer…

Transferring Photos To Wood

Here's a fun project to try if you're looking for an earthy, antique-y way to display your photographs: transfer them to wood. Photographer James Brandon created this tutorial after his wife talked him into transferring a photograph with the technique, and he was blown away by the results. I'd have to agree; it's a pretty great way to create a totally unique print. After all, everybody's making nice photographs these days—but almost nobody is printing them on big hunks of trees! Make a big print on wood and you're sure to have a one-of-a-kind piece of art for your wall. Read all about it at the DPS blog, then get to work!

http://digital-photography-school.com/how-to-transfer-prints-to-wood-an-awesome-photography-diy-project
DPMag
Here's a fun project to try if you're looking for an earthy, antique-y way to display your photographs: transfer them to wood. Photographer James Brandon created this tutorial after his wife talked him into transferring a photograph with the technique, and he was blown away by the results. I'd have…

The Superman Of Surf Photography

This one's especially for OP editor Chris Robinson, because I know he's a fan of surfing and great surf photography—though I cannot attest to his own prowess when it comes to hanging ten. I'm sure, though, that he's much better at it than I am. Just like I'm sure that surf photographer Zak Noyle puts us both to shame when it comes to feeling at home in the water. I'm no beach boy, but I know great photography when I see it, and his stuff's wonderful. Even better is to see the behind the scenes exploration of Zak's photography, how he works in his ocean studio, and the lengths to which he'll go to get a great shot. It's another great F-stoppers video production, well worth a watch—even if you've never even dipped a toe in the ocean. 

http://fstoppers.com/behind-the-scenes-with-zak-noyle
DPMag
This one's especially for OP editor Chris Robinson, because I know he's a fan of surfing and great surf photography—though I cannot attest to his own prowess when it comes to hanging ten. I'm sure, though, that he's much better at it than I am. Just like I'm sure that…

From Personal Project To PBS Series

As a working photographer I fully understand the importance of "personal projects." You see, once you attach a payment to any activity—even a fun one like photography—it becomes a job. A great job, mind you, and I'm not complaining. But still, sometimes it's a job, and sometimes you need to re-stimulate your creative energy with personal work. It's not only where you have the most fun, it's often where you photograph the most interesting things that find their way into your portfolio, and hopefully lead to more work—work that's more like your personal projects. A good example is the story of David Friedman. He's a photographer who left an unfulfilling job to pursue projects of more personal interest. That eventually led to Friedman making portraits of inventors, which led to meeting some very interesting people, which led to interviewing and video recording interviews, which led to his very own television show on PBS. Read more about Friedman's project—and be sure to watch the interview with the man who invented the "screw-in coffin"—and then be sure to get out there and start your own personal project. You may not land a TV deal, but it's sure to be fulfilling nonetheless.

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2012/11/21/how-david-friedmans-inventor-project-became-a-pbs-series
DPMag
As a working photographer I fully understand the importance of "personal projects." You see, once you attach a payment to any activity—even a fun one like photography—it becomes a job. A great job, mind you, and I'm not complaining. But still, sometimes it's a job, and sometimes you need to…
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