Better Food Photography (If You Must!)

Everybody's a food photographer these days, or so it seems. The epidemic—er, I mean the trend—is spreading like a plague—er, I mean like wildfire. Can you tell from my snarky tone that I'm fairly tired of seeing my Facebook feed full of iPhone snaps of tacos and tarts and tapenades? Enough with the snap-shoddy food photography! (I even read a NYT article recently about how some restaurants are overrun with food photographers and have begun banning the practice!) Maybe I'd feel differently if everybody knew a little more about making good food photographs. And maybe they'd know a little more if they read Natalie Johnson's 5 simple tips for stronger food photographs via the DPS blog. If you insist on snapping all of your meals, it's a must-read.

http://digital-photography-school.com/food-photography-%E2%80%93-5-simple-ways-to-get-stronger-shot
DPMag
Everybody's a food photographer these days, or so it seems. The epidemic—er, I mean the trend—is spreading like a plague—er, I mean like wildfire. Can you tell from my snarky tone that I'm fairly tired of seeing my Facebook feed full of iPhone snaps of tacos and tarts and tapenades?…

High-Resolution RhinoCam

So you want to use your favorite Hasselblad lenses with your compact little Sony NEX camera? No problem. That's right: I said no problem. You see, Fotodiox—the folks behind various fun and useful camera and flash accessories—has created a sliding adaptor mechanism that allows you to take advantage of the large circle of light produced by a medium format lens, and after stitching multiple exposures together create a 140-plus megapixel ultra-high-resolution image file. Sure, it won't work with a moving subject, but for still life shooters and landscape photographers, this wacky rig just might make sense. As someone who often laments the loss of those great old Zeiss lenses I used on my Hassy, I'm seriously considering this investment. Read more at http://www.pixiq.com/article/fotodiox-rhinocam-0 then head over to the Fotodiox web site for the specs and particulars.

http://fotodioxpro.com/index.php/vizelex-rhinocam-for-sony-nex-e-mount-cameras.html
DPMag
So you want to use your favorite Hasselblad lenses with your compact little Sony NEX camera? No problem. That's right: I said no problem. You see, Fotodiox—the folks behind various fun and useful camera and flash accessories—has created a sliding adaptor mechanism that allows you to take advantage of the…

Harry Callahan At Conscientious

This post is about two of my favorite things that I always look forward to sharing with others: the Conscientious blog and the amazing photography of Harry Callahan. Recently on Conscientious—the blog where Joerg Colberg writes about fine photography and photo books—he told of the new Callahan retrospective taking place in Hamburg, Germany. While it's doubtful I'll be able to visit Germany next month to see the show, what I can do is purchase the book that accompanies the exhibition, titled simply Harry Callahan. According to Colberg, it's a beautiful book that lays out Callahan's long career and tremendous body of work in chronological order—which makes sense to me, as watching the artist evolve seems like the best way to view his tremendous work. Anyway, if you happen to be visiting Germany soon, or if you're like me a fan of Harry Callahan, make an effort to see the show or get the book. For a look inside the book via video tour, check out the Deichtorhallen Museum's web site as well.

http://jmcolberg.com/weblog/2013/04/review_harry_callahan/
http://www.deichtorhallen.de/index.php?id=350&L=1
DPMag
This post is about two of my favorite things that I always look forward to sharing with others: the Conscientious blog and the amazing photography of Harry Callahan. Recently on Conscientious—the blog where Joerg Colberg writes about fine photography and photo books—he told of the new Callahan retrospective taking place…

Unseen New York City

This post should be about a year old, but somehow I missed it when last year the New York Department of Records released almost one million historic photographs documenting everything from life in the city in the mid-1800s, to the construction of some of Gotham's most notable architectural landmarks. It's a fascinating look at the world's greatest city, and something New Yorkers (and fans of the city—and heck, fans of historic photography in general) are sure to love sinking their eyes into. Read more at the Daily Mail, then head over to the Department's web site to have a look through the archives yourself. (Oh, and thanks to Shaun Sundholm and his great blog for telling us about the story in the first place.)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2134408/Never-seen-photos-100-years-ago-tell-vivid-story-gritty-New-York-City.html
DPMag
This post should be about a year old, but somehow I missed it when last year the New York Department of Records released almost one million historic photographs documenting everything from life in the city in the mid-1800s, to the construction of some of Gotham's most notable architectural landmarks. It's…

A Shortcut To Using Shortcuts

I'm sort of cuckoo for shortcuts and timesavers when it comes to the computer-based part of my photographic workflow. I believe not only should you automate every repetitive task as much as possible, but you should also incorporate keyboard shortcuts—also called speedkeys—to make the hands-on tasks flow even faster. It really is amazing how much more efficient it is to be able to change tools and apply adjustments without having to use the mouse to navigate menus and palettes. With one hand on the keyboard and the other on the mouse or tablet, you can fly through your digital workflow. So here is a great list of ways you can incorporate speedkeys into your Lightroom usage. For those of you who don't use Lightroom, many of the principles at play also apply to other programs, so you can make your own cheat sheets and keyboard overlays for any software you'd like. Check it out at http://www.diyphotography.net/use-keyboard-shortcuts-expedite-your-lightroom-workflow.
DPMag
I'm sort of cuckoo for shortcuts and timesavers when it comes to the computer-based part of my photographic workflow. I believe not only should you automate every repetitive task as much as possible, but you should also incorporate keyboard shortcuts—also called speedkeys—to make the hands-on tasks flow even faster. It…

Lighten Your Lighting Load With A Superclamp

One of my constant concerns is minimizing the amount of gear I have to take on location. Extra lights, stands, grip equipment... All of these things are crucial for a professional photographer who absolutely has to get the shot. But all that weight and size adds up quickly. With location portrait setups, for instance, I have found that rather than take along a large c-stand to hold the flag that keeps my hair light from causing lens flare, I can simply take the knuckle from a c-stand and affix it atop a regular eight-foot light stand—which is much smaller and lighter than a c-stand. Well just the other day, a new assistant made a suggestion that would allow me to further strip down the equipment I have to carry without compromising on technique. Instead of putting that hair light on its own eight-foot stand near the background, I could simply affix a clamp to the top of the background stand or crossbar and mount my hair light to that. I had the perfect solution on hand—a Manfrotto Superclamp. For $30, the Superclamp comes with a regular stud for mounting a light, and the jaws of the clamp tighten easily around the background crossbar (or many other objects as well). An elegant solution that makes my road kit that much lighter and easier to haul from location to location—which is the toughest part of the job.

http://www.adorama.com/BG2900.html
DPMag
One of my constant concerns is minimizing the amount of gear I have to take on location. Extra lights, stands, grip equipment... All of these things are crucial for a professional photographer who absolutely has to get the shot. But all that weight and size adds up quickly. With location…
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