A Remedy For Visual Bias

Do you ever feel like you're consistently producing photographs that are somehow skewed? What I mean is, do you find yourself occasionally producing work that is either too dark, or too light? Maybe too warm, or too cool? A lot of these problems are solved by keeping your monitor well controlled with profiling hardware, but I've found that I still develop habits that affect my work. Reading The Online Photographer recently I found a great way to combat at least one of those trends, and I put it to work immediately. You see, I'd been feeling that my work was erring on the "too bright" side. Not necessarily overexposed, but just brighter than I felt like it needed to be. And it occurred to me when reading about Canvas Value in Photoshop on TOP that my fairly bright computer background could be making me overcompensate in my photos, producing work that is brighter than it needs to be. So I adjusted my Photoshop Canvas Value to make it a fairly dark gray. Now when compared to the background against which I'm working, a slightly darker photo will appear "normal" and I'll be more inclined to produce subtly darker work—counteracting that disturbing trend that had been skewing my work of late. Sometimes it's the simplest techniques that have the biggest impact on your photographs.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2012/11/a-tip-canvas-value-in-photoshop.html
DPMag
Do you ever feel like you're consistently producing photographs that are somehow skewed? What I mean is, do you find yourself occasionally producing work that is either too dark, or too light? Maybe too warm, or too cool? A lot of these problems are solved by keeping your monitor well…

The Brenizer Method

Ever heard of the Brenizer method? Photographer Ryan Brenizer developed it, and lucky him it gets to have his name attached to it forever. It's fairly straightforward, and it goes like this. You want to make a wide angle view of a scene, but you want it to have the shallow depth of field of a telephoto shot with a wide aperture. What do you do? Simple: you shoot several exposures of the scene with a long lens and wide aperture to get the shallow DOF you need, and then you stitch them together to create the wide angle. It's one of those things that's optically impossible, but photographically beautiful. Why didn't I think of that? Then it could have been named after me instead.

http://www.ryanbrenizer.com/category/brenizer-method/
DPMag
Ever heard of the Brenizer method? Photographer Ryan Brenizer developed it, and lucky him it gets to have his name attached to it forever. It's fairly straightforward, and it goes like this. You want to make a wide angle view of a scene, but you want it to have the…

Simple Data Security—The Old Fashioned Way

I found some great advice on the DPS blog about data safety procedures. Sure, it's a good article about using duplicate media cards when you have the opportunity, and importing and archiving and backing up your data, and all of those tips are always wonderfully useful. But the one that really caught my eye isn't mentioned in the text, it's elegantly illustrated in the photograph accompanying the story: there's a bold "REWARD!!!" sticker on the removable SD card. Brilliant! I think I'll have to start doing this. Not only including my name and number, but maybe offering a reward worth more than the value of the card for the return of the card. Because after all, it's the pictures you're concerned about, not the card, right? I love this idea. The simpler the better—and that much more effective, I'm sure.

http://digital-photography-school.com/four-tips-on-your-image-data-safety-procedures
DPMag
I found some great advice on the DPS blog about data safety procedures. Sure, it's a good article about using duplicate media cards when you have the opportunity, and importing and archiving and backing up your data, and all of those tips are always wonderfully useful. But the one that…

The Future Of Smart Cameras

If you can get past the Apple vs. Android fanboys and haters so vocal in the comments, this article at DP Review is a great read. Allan Hoffman hypothesizes about what the future of smart cameras may look like. The idea being that iPhone and Android smartphones sure are great cameras, and we've now got camera makers now dipping their toes into the "smart" world of features that are similar to many features on smartphones. It's a continually blurring line that should eventually deliver some very interesting options for us photographers/phone-users in the coming years. The question I keep asking is not just can I get a camera into my phone, but rather when can I get a phone in my camera? Imagine your favorite compact point-and-shoot being able to make calls and send texts. No, it wouldn't be for everybody, but I'd sure love it. It would make it a lot easier to good carry a camera wherever you go, that's for sure. Whatever your take, it sure is fun to think about, especially when you figure that some of our wildest dreams are bound to come true in the smart phones and cameras of tomorrow.

http://connect.dpreview.com/post/1040822089/smartcamera-future-for-apple
DPMag
If you can get past the Apple vs. Android fanboys and haters so vocal in the comments, this article at DP Review is a great read. Allan Hoffman hypothesizes about what the future of smart cameras may look like. The idea being that iPhone and Android smartphones sure are great…

Night Skies In The City

Have you ever wondered what New York City would look like in the middle of the night if all of the lights were turned off? Photographer Thierry Cohen can show you, if you don't mind a little bit of imagination thrown in. No, he couldn't shut off all the lights in New York for real—he had to do that digitally. But when he combined those now—darkened urban scenes (from cities around the world, I should point out) with photographs of starry night skies made in remote locations on the same latitude, he delivers what the night sky would actually look like to a New Yorker fortunate enough to find his city completely in the dark. Fortunate for those who hate light pollution, I mean—not so fortunate to the millions of people who'd have to deal with that massive havoc if the lights were really turned off! Maybe it's better that we leave the lights on in reality, and only turn them off in this wonderful art.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/02/03/magazine/look-stars.html
DPMag
Have you ever wondered what New York City would look like in the middle of the night if all of the lights were turned off? Photographer Thierry Cohen can show you, if you don't mind a little bit of imagination thrown in. No, he couldn't shut off all the lights…

Lego For Your Lens Cap

Lose your lens cap? If you're chronically uncovered or if you have a hard time keeping track of your lens caps, consider trying this fun fix courtesy of the DIY Photography blog. You can use Lego pieces to affix your lens cap to your camera strap, tripod leg or just about anything else. Sure, it may not be as practical as using industrial strength hook and loop fasteners for the job, but it's a whole lot more fun. And on the plus side you get to sport a colorful bit of Lego on the front of your lens—when it's capped, that is.

http://www.diyphotography.net/use-lego-to-keep-your-lens-cap-safe
DPMag
Lose your lens cap? If you're chronically uncovered or if you have a hard time keeping track of your lens caps, consider trying this fun fix courtesy of the DIY Photography blog. You can use Lego pieces to affix your lens cap to your camera strap, tripod leg or just…
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