Stop Action Fashion Edit Animation

This is a neat video of photographer Kwaku Alston editing the take from a recent fashion shoot with actress Drew Barrymore. Alston isn't retouching here, he's editing to decide which ones he likes the best. And heck, let's be clear: I doubt he edits them this way in reality. But the stop action animation effect is great, and it's a wonderful way to showcase a great bunch of photos from what certainly appears to be a successful, high-energy shoot. There's also a great behind the scenes video, and more information about the Drew Barrymore project on the page. Oh, and thanks to the ever-outstanding Feature Shoot blog for pointing us to this clip.

http://artofstudio.com/the-drew-barrymore-project-11318
DPMag
This is a neat video of photographer Kwaku Alston editing the take from a recent fashion shoot with actress Drew Barrymore. Alston isn't retouching here, he's editing to decide which ones he likes the best. And heck, let's be clear: I doubt he edits them this way in reality. But…

Reality VS. Photoshop. Does it Matter?

Our friends at Outdoor Photographer recently published a blog post by Bill Hatcher that I think is a must-read for many photographers. You see, at Outdoor Photographer, whenever the magazine sponsors a photo contest or publishes a gallery of reader photos, the comments fill up quickly with complaints that the photos are "overprocessed." My first problem with the complaint is that quite often the images aren't really overcooked at all. Or at least they don't appear to be to me. It's as if any time someone sees a deep blue sky, or warm sunset light and they accuse the photographer of succumbing to the evils of HDR. Now don't get me wrong—I don't love fake looking overprocessed HDR landscapes either, but I certainly don't think every bold, colorful photo is a function of HDR or too much post processing. My second issue with this complaint is... So what? Even if it is overdone and you don't like it… Big deal! There are plenty of things I don't like, but just because I judge something—someone else's work of art, mind you—not to my liking, it's somehow necessary to decree that this photograph as a lesser work in my eyes? It's preposterous. Get off your high horse, climb down from your ivory tower. There are no rules about photography. There is no "right" and "wrong." If you don't like it, don't do it. But let's agree to stop all of our bickering about what's real and what's not. It's fine to have an opinion, and even to share it. There's constructive criticism, and there's petty whining. Let's not forget that none of us is the ultimate arbiter of taste—especially when it comes to someone else's photography. Ultimately, if you don't like it and want to show the rest of us how it's done… then show us how it's done! Share your work. That makes the greatest statement of what you think a good photograph should look like. Oh yes, and one more thing. If I hear one more comment about the good old days of film and how realistic it was, I'm going to cry. Let us not forget that black & white photography is inherently an abstraction of reality, and perhaps the greatest black & white landscape master worked hard to create photographs that represented his vision more than they represented the facts of a scene. The most popular color film for a generation of landscape photographers—Fuji Velvia—was popular precisely because of how rich and saturated it was. Photoshop is not evil, and HDR is not wrong. So let's all take it down a notch and try appreciate good photography of all kinds, even when it's not our own cup of tea.

http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/columns/photo-adventure/keeping-it-real-or-calling-it-art.html
DPMag
Our friends at Outdoor Photographer recently published a blog post by Bill Hatcher that I think is a must-read for many photographers. You see, at Outdoor Photographer, whenever the magazine sponsors a photo contest or publishes a gallery of reader photos, the comments fill up quickly with complaints that the…

Fixing Blue Skies With Lightroom

Here's a useful tip, made even more necessary when working outdoors this time of year. No, it's not about staying warm when shooting in winter, it's about helping those not-quite-as-blue-as-you'd-like-them skies to being more beautifully blue. Jason Weddington writes on the DPS blog about using some of Lightroom 4's simple tools and techniques to help make a washed out blue sky a little more bold, a little more vibrant, a little more straight up blue. No, it's not a tutorial in making unrealistic, candy-colored landscapes. It's just a simple way to help make a blue sky a little more photogenic, and you don't need to be a computer expert to make it happen.

http://digital-photography-school.com/enhancing-blue-skies-in-lightroom
DPMag
Here's a useful tip, made even more necessary when working outdoors this time of year. No, it's not about staying warm when shooting in winter, it's about helping those not-quite-as-blue-as-you'd-like-them skies to being more beautifully blue. Jason Weddington writes on the DPS blog about using some of Lightroom 4's simple…

Hands-On Copyright Protection

If you find your photograph on a site where it doesn't belong, do you know what to do about it? I don't mean send an invoice and hire a lawyer, I mean the basics. Namely, how to send a takedown request the quick and easy way via our old friends at Google. Google announced last month that it now receives an average of 2.5 million copyright infringement-related takedown requests every week. (Thanks to Rob Haggart's A Photo Editor blog to pointing me to this interesting statistic.) In the last six months since Google made it incredibly easy to report copyright infringers—whether they're using your photos, music or other copyrighted intellectual property—the company reports that takedown requests have grown tenfold. So if you find your photo being used improperly, yes you can start by sending the infringer an invoice and hiring a lawyer, but you should also visit Google to have the content removed from search results. Check out the cold hard facts, straight from Google's mouth, on their copyright data page,  then head over to the search giant's information page for help on removing infringing content from Google's index. 

http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/copyright
http://support.google.com/bin/static.py?hl=en&ts=1114905&page=ts.cs
DPMag
If you find your photograph on a site where it doesn't belong, do you know what to do about it? I don't mean send an invoice and hire a lawyer, I mean the basics. Namely, how to send a takedown request the quick and easy way via our old friends…

The Earth At Night

Here's a pretty pretty beautiful image of the earth, not only because it animates the planet's rotation, but because it's comprised of images of our earth at night. It comes from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, via the Pixiq photo blog. The animation was made of images captured over 22 days in the spring and fall of 2012. The satellite had to make 312 orbits to capture 2.5 terabytes of data, which provided a perfectly clear image of every last little bit of the Earth's surface. It's a beautifully subtle image of dark tones punctuated by occasional bursts of map-defining electric light. Simply gorgeous.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/earth-at-night-from-space-the-big-picture#3GyKVGST0dBIK1ca.99
DPMag
Here's a pretty pretty beautiful image of the earth, not only because it animates the planet's rotation, but because it's comprised of images of our earth at night. It comes from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, via the Pixiq photo blog. The animation was made of images captured over…

New Year's Resolutions For Photographers

This new year is still young, and so I think it's fitting to consider your most important new years resolutions for 2013. Not the personal kind, like exercise more and eat less, but the photographic kind—like pushing your creative boundaries to become a better photographer. Tremendous outdoor photographer, blogger and educator Ian Plant has published a list of his personal Top 5 New Year's resolutions for photographers on the OP blog. It's a good place to start when looking for a little bit of creative guidance to get this year off to a great start. 

http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/ian-plant/2013/01/top-5-new-year%E2%80%99s-resolutions-for-photographers.html
DPMag
This new year is still young, and so I think it's fitting to consider your most important new years resolutions for 2013. Not the personal kind, like exercise more and eat less, but the photographic kind—like pushing your creative boundaries to become a better photographer. Tremendous outdoor photographer, blogger and…
Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.