Brazen Camera Thieves

Believe it or not, gutsy camera thieves can actually steal the lens right off your D-SLR without you even noticing. And according to the BBC, they're actually doing it and getting away scot-free. The same quick release button that makes it easy for you to swap lenses on your camera body also makes it equally easy for shady characters to do the same when your camera's slung casually over your shoulder. Check out the Pixiq blog for the lowdown, to see video of master thieves in action, and for a bit of advice on how to protect yourself while traveling.

http://www.pixiq.com/article/lens-thieves
DPMag
Believe it or not, gutsy camera thieves can actually steal the lens right off your D-SLR without you even noticing. And according to the BBC, they're actually doing it and getting away scot-free. The same quick release button that makes it easy for you to swap lenses on your camera…

An Unseen Ad Campaign

I've been a fan of Blair Bunting's photography since I first saw one of his intense football portraits last year. His work's got an edgy, gritty look that lends itself to all sorts of subjects. Along with a portfolio full of athletes, Blair also photographs advertisements for some very popular reality TV shows, including my personal favorite—Discovery's Deadliest Catch. Fans of the show know that a beloved principal character, Captain Phil, died suddenly last year. It just so happened that Blair had been commissioned to shoot an ad campaign playing on the "cheating death" aspects of the violent nature of crab fishing. Running the campaign, which was completed just days before Captain Phil's death, would have been in poor taste, so it was cancelled. That was more than a year ago, but just last week Blair finally decided to show some of his favorite images from the unused campaign. Not only does Blair's blog currently show a great example of an image from the group, it also includes a neat behind the scenes video showing how he pulled the shots together in the studio. Check out the intense images and read about how Blair even used his own teeth to give an image a dose of gory reality.

http://www.blairbunting.com/blog/?p=2291

DPMag
I've been a fan of Blair Bunting's photography since I first saw one of his intense football portraits last year. His work's got an edgy, gritty look that lends itself to all sorts of subjects. Along with a portfolio full of athletes, Blair also photographs advertisements for some very popular…

Music For Your Multimedia

Vimeo has become a favorite outlet for video projects among those who relish high-quality video online. With minimal compression and maximum fidelity, Vimeo tends to cater to folks who are doing more than throwaway home videos. That’s partly why the company recently announced its own music store, specifically for creators who need music tracks to put into their videos—whether they’re made for commercial purposes or otherwise. With 45,000 tracks available in its library, and prices from free to $98 (depending on whether the project is personal or commercial) it’s a phenomenal resource for videographers—and for us photographers who are venturing into the ever-changing multimedia landscape. See for yourself at Vimeo, and then get to work on your next great masterpiece!

http://vimeo.com/musicstore

DPMag
Fall is finally here in my part of the world. Summer hung on for quite a while, but this week the crisp air of fall finally crept over my hometown. I’m guessing it’s doing the same for many readers, too. And that puts me in the mood for enjoying fall…

Fall Photography Galleries

Fall is finally here in my part of the world. Summer hung on for quite a while, but this week the crisp air of fall finally crept over my hometown. I’m guessing it’s doing the same for many readers, too. And that puts me in the mood for enjoying fall and the great photo opportunities that come with it. There's lots of great photography to see—a lot more than just colorful foliage—in two beautiful galleries courtesy of The Atlantic and MSNBC. What’s great about each of them is that they’re representative of autumn all across the world, with images from multiple continents and cultures. Check them out and get ready for the splendor of fall wherever, and whenever, you will find it.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44849031/ns/travel-picture_stories/
http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/10/fall-is-in-the-air/100167/

DPMag
Fall is finally here in my part of the world. Summer hung on for quite a while, but this week the crisp air of fall finally crept over my hometown. I’m guessing it’s doing the same for many readers, too. And that puts me in the mood for enjoying fall…

W. Eugene Smith Grant

Tonight in New York the $30,000 grant recipient of the 2011 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography will be announced. The annual ceremony is free and open to the public, and celebrates the grant that was established in 1978 after the death of W. Eugene Smith. One of the most prestigious honors in photojournalism, the grant is given to a photographer whose past work and proposed future project follows the tradition of W. Eugene Smith's “concerned photography and dedicated compassion” that he exhibited throughout his long career. Learn more about the grant process, Smith’s photography and past awardees—including some of the most prominent names in photojournalism—at the memorial fund web site.

http://smithfund.org


DPMag
Tonight in New York the $30,000 grant recipient of the 2011 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography will be announced. The annual ceremony is free and open to the public, and celebrates the grant that was established in 1978 after the death of W. Eugene Smith. One of the…

Hack Your Old Camera

What to do with your old, unused (and practically unusable) 35mm film cameras? Turn them into flash focusing snoots, of course. If you tear off the back of your film camera and use enough tape and bungee cords you can shove your handheld flash into it and utilize the now dead camera's lens to focus, and therefore project, the flash over longer distances, in more refined shapes, and with patterns built in. That last part is only, of course, if you decide to insert a patterned transparency between dead camera and flash. It's a bit ridiculous, but certainly clever. And if you're drowning in near worthless old film cameras and plenty of time on your hands, why not give it a shot? It may not be practical, but it’s certain to grab attention!

http://www.diyphotography.net/convert-your-old-camera-to-a-backdrop-projector-in-10-easy-steps


DPMag
What to do with your old, unused (and practically unusable) 35mm film cameras? Turn them into flash focusing snoots, of course. If you tear off the back of your film camera and use enough tape and bungee cords you can shove your handheld flash into it and utilize the now…
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