Photographers On Photography

I don’t just write this blog. Obviously I have a life and a family and I take pictures, but I mean I write more blogs than this one. I also write another blog about photography that, at the risk of sounding entirely too self serving, I thought you might be interested in as well. I call it Key Words: Photographers On Photography, and I’ve been updating it for about a year. It’s a little bit amorphous, with no set schedule or agenda, but it does have one constant principle that drives it: when I read something about photography and I find it so informative or inspiring that I just have to print it out and paste it on my wall, I also paste it on my digital wall—via the Key Words blog. I include things about creativity, technique, the photo business... anything that I find particularly informative or inspiring to help me with my photography. Feel free to check it out. I hope you will find it helpful with your own photography too.

http://www.sawalich.com/keywords
DPMag
I don’t just write this blog. Obviously I have a life and a family and I take pictures, but I mean I write more blogs than this one. I also write another blog about photography that, at the risk of sounding entirely too self serving, I thought you might be…

The Practice Of Contemplative Photography

I’ve always enjoyed photography as much more than just a means to an end. It’s not always about the pictures as much as, on a personal level, it’s about the making of those pictures. The act of photographing can itself be a very enjoyable, even meditative, experience. To that end there’s a new book that aims to help photographers connect on a deeper level with their daily world via their photographic experiences. It’s a book about how to see as much as it is about how to take pictures. It’s called The Practice of Contemplative Photography and it’s out this month from authors Andy Karr and Michael Wood. Drawing on Buddhist traditions and insights from photographic masters, the book works to teach photographers to ìsee what’s in front of them.î Very Zen. Very apt, too, given the nature of the art of photography. This looks like a great read that I’ll be putting on my wish list.

http://www.facebook.com/the.practice.of.contemplative.photography
DPMag
I’ve always enjoyed photography as much more than just a means to an end. It’s not always about the pictures as much as, on a personal level, it’s about the making of those pictures. The act of photographing can itself be a very enjoyable, even meditative, experience. To that end…

Cave Photography

Do you remember when earlier this year James Cameron (of Titanic and Avatar fame) released a 3D movie called Sanctum? It didn't get a lot of critical acclaim, and it wasn’t around for very long, so I don’t blame you if you missed it. One thing it did do quite well was show some beautiful cave images, and raise some interesting questions about cave diving and photography. National Geographic took the lead on setting the record straight by interviewing photographer Stephen Alvarez, a cave expert, about what it's really like to explore—and photograph—in these treacherous locations far underground. You can watch the movie trailer and read the interesting interview at National Geographic's Blog Central. 

http://blogs.ngm.com/blog_central/2011/02/sanctum-raises-cave-questions-nat-geo-photographer-answers-them.html
DPMag
Do you remember when earlier this year James Cameron (of Titanic and Avatar fame) released a 3D movie called Sanctum? It didn't get a lot of critical acclaim, and it wasn’t around for very long, so I don’t blame you if you missed it. One thing it did do quite…

Why You Should Shoot JPEG Instead Of RAW

I know most of you are used to hearing the advice, "Shoot RAW!" shouted over and over, but there are a few key exceptions to that generally good rule. There are actually times when you should shoot JPEG files instead of RAW. When might that be? According to a recent piece on the Digital Photography School blog, sports photographers suggest shooting JPEG files when you want to work very fast to capture fast action—as they do all the time. You should also consider JPEG files when you're forced to conserve storage space and a RAW file would simply eat up too much of it. There are a couple of other ideal times to capture JPEG in lieu of RAW, but for that you'll have to go check out the original article. And now you don't have to feel bad if you too prefer to shoot JPEG—that is, as long as you're doing it for the right reasons.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/4-reasons-to-switch-to-jpeg
DPMag
I know most of you are used to hearing the advice, "Shoot RAW!" shouted over and over, but there are a few key exceptions to that generally good rule. There are actually times when you should shoot JPEG files instead of RAW. When might that be? According to a recent…

Reducing Digital Noise In Camera

Sensor noise has gotten a lot of press in recent years. Digital noise, particularly from high-ISO photography, has gotten considerably better with innovations in digital camera sensors and image processing algorithms. Still, though, noise is a real issue for almost every photographer, no matter what she might be shooting. Light Stalking has published a nice tutorial about noise and its causes, as well as a few great tips for reducing noise without resorting to post-production trickery. Advice centers on the common sense approaches of shooting with lower ISOs and subtle overexposure, as well as keeping the camera itself cool. Great advice for anybody who doesn't want to take a "fix it in post" approach but still wants to make low-noise photographs.

http://www.lightstalking.com/reduce-noise
DPMag
Sensor noise has gotten a lot of press in recent years. Digital noise, particularly from high-ISO photography, has gotten considerably better with innovations in digital camera sensors and image processing algorithms. Still, though, noise is a real issue for almost every photographer, no matter what she might be shooting. Light…

A Great Video About Sibling Photojournalists

Yet another reason to love YouTube. It's like the library of congress for quirky videos. Do you remember a great news item from 15 years ago? Check YouTube and, sure enough, it probably lives there. The 15-year-old piece in this case is a great interview and exploration of the work of twin brother photographers Peter and David Turnley. These world-class photojournalists can teach all of us a thing or two about documentary photography, and image gathering in general. It's interesting enough that twin brothers both became prize-winning photographers; even more so when you consider just how competitive they are. The nice thing about the 60 minutes story is that it isn’t just a mere glimpse, but a real in-depth exploration; this piece, called Double Exposure, comes in at nearly 14 minutes long. It's intense but worthwhile. Thanks to Michael Johnston at The Online Photographer for linking to this interesting video. 

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/02/double-exposure.html
DPMag
Yet another reason to love YouTube. It's like the library of congress for quirky videos. Do you remember a great news item from 15 years ago? Check YouTube and, sure enough, it probably lives there. The 15-year-old piece in this case is a great interview and exploration of the work…
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