Understanding Flash Sync And Shutter Curtains

Cameras work in mysterious ways. That's even more true in the digital era, but the simple mechanics of a shutter are about as astounding to me as the workings of a fine watch or NASA’s ability to put a man on the moon. Once you get beyond the basics I'm not much of a mechanical engineer. That's why this video post from DIY Photography is especially appealing. It explains in easy to understand terms how a camera's shutter curtain works, and how a flash synchronizes with the shutter. I’m particularly fond of the shower curtain analogy: close from one side, then open from another. That's kind of the same way a shutter curtain, actually a pair of curtains, works. The video is sure to help many photographers figure out how their SLRs functions—and that almost always leads to better pictures. Why? Because with an understanding of how a camera works, we can make better technical choices to achieve the specific camera and lighting effects we're after. And we're more apt not to mess up shutter sync when working with a flash.  

http://www.diyphotography.net/understanding-flash-sync-shutter-curtains-and-high-speed-sync
DPMag
Cameras work in mysterious ways. That's even more true in the digital era, but the simple mechanics of a shutter are about as astounding to me as the workings of a fine watch or NASA’s ability to put a man on the moon. Once you get beyond the basics I'm…

Antique Expedition Images In Color

Now this is something I actually want to add to my gear bag. Tired of using those same bland, flavorless gels to color the light coming from your hot-shoe flash? Well try these new edible gels from General Mills. They're not sold in camera stores, though—you have to get them in the grocery store. They're called Fruit Roll-Ups, and while they've long been a popular snack, a desperate photographer recently found out they can also be used as flash gels. Talk about a tasty alternative. Read all about it at the Strobist blog. 

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2011/02/compared-to-these-rosco-gels-taste-like.html
DPMag
Now this is something I actually want to add to my gear bag. Tired of using those same bland, flavorless gels to color the light coming from your hot-shoe flash? Well try these new edible gels from General Mills. They're not sold in camera stores, though—you have to get them…

Military Training In Photography

The military has always been a tremendous proving ground for some of the world’s best photographers. One of my first photography teachers, in fact, often referenced his military training in photography as a way to inspire his students to do more, to go above and beyond, and to do whatever it takes to get the shot. The Light Stalking blog has compiled a gallery of great images from Army photographers as a way to showcase the fine photographic work they do, as well as to offer a glimpse into Army life as only an army photographer may be able to provide. Worth a look whether you’re a military buff or simply if you’re interested in outstanding documentary photography.

http://www.lightstalking.com/us-army
DPMag
The military has always been a tremendous proving ground for some of the world’s best photographers. One of my first photography teachers, in fact, often referenced his military training in photography as a way to inspire his students to do more, to go above and beyond, and to do whatever…

The Last Lions

National Geographic photographers Beverly and Dereck Joubert gave a TED talk last month in which they discussed their documentary, The Last Lions. In case you missed it, or if you’re not in LA, New York or Washington DC where the film is screening, now you’ve got another chance to see these amazing and unsettling images. There’s a book to accompany the project, which tells the story of a family of lions in Botswana’s Okavango Delta. I’m a big fan of TED talks, a sucker for gorgeous wildlife photography, and I will forever be in awe of the lengths to which National Geographic photographers will go to tell us these important stories of conservation. Read all about and watch the TED talk at the Brain Pickings blog, and follow that with a visit to the official Last Lions film site. There you’ll find photo galleries and information about the filmmakers and the Big Cats Initiative to help preserve these animals and their habitats.

http://movies.nationalgeographic.com/movies/last-lions
http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/02/22/the-last-lions
DPMag
National Geographic photographers Beverly and Dereck Joubert gave a TED talk last month in which they discussed their documentary, The Last Lions. In case you missed it, or if you’re not in LA, New York or Washington DC where the film is screening, now you’ve got another chance to see…

The Best List Of The Best Lists

Sometimes I like to look at great photos just to get inspired. The next time I want to do that I’m going to look at this list compiled by Jim Goldstein on the Digital Photography School blog. It's a list of lists—the 162 best "best photos of 2010" lists. Whether you’re interested in travel, landscape, wildlife or documentary photography, this list has got it from great photographers including Peter West Carey, Jay Goodrich and Bill Neill. This uber-list is a one-stop shop of photographic inspiration—and a great way to get to know the work of 162 different photographers from new amateurs to seasoned vets.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/162-best-photos-of-2010-blog-posts
DPMag
Sometimes I like to look at great photos just to get inspired. The next time I want to do that I’m going to look at this list compiled by Jim Goldstein on the Digital Photography School blog. It's a list of lists—the 162 best "best photos of 2010" lists. Whether…

Wedding Photographer Ups The Ante

Hey wedding photographers, this one's for you—especially if you're looking for a way to increase your "wow" factor. I went to a wedding recently and, as I often do, I kept my eye on the wedding photographer to glean whatever I can from his approach. It was a very interesting experience. First of all, there wasn't a photographer—there was a team. Handling the photography and the video, these five folks (led by one clear primary photographer) had every moment covered from multiple angles on stills and video. This wedding-as-photo-shoot approach may be a little more invasive than I personally prefer, but one thing was very clear: these folks were working hard to get their shots. Turns out the team was doing a great job—which they put proudly on display with a slideshow of the day's photographs presented during the reception! That's right: the reception paused after dinner and before dancing in order to dim the lights and play a 15-minute slideshow of images, accompanied by music (professionally licensed music, I wonder?) and the "oohs and ahhs" of the bridal party and guests. The images were great, they provided a glimpse into the parts of the day most of us guests weren't privy to, and it seemed to be a hit with the bride and groom. What was most noteworthy to me, though, was the photographer's ability to turn a paying job into a portfolio showing for a crowded room of 200-some prospects. Anybody in that room considering hiring a wedding photographer was now convinced of one thing: this guy was great. And that is what I call upping the ante and taking your wedding photography to the next level. As much as anything, I'm impressed by this photographer's ability to think outside the box and create a showcase of finished images before the day was even done. 
DPMag
Hey wedding photographers, this one's for you—especially if you're looking for a way to increase your "wow" factor. I went to a wedding recently and, as I often do, I kept my eye on the wedding photographer to glean whatever I can from his approach. It was a very interesting…
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