A Photographic Scholarship

Photographers can now apply for a unique scholarship from the American Photographic Artists association and the Lucie Foundation. This award is a little different than most because it's more like a grant, and instead of being geared to young, "emerging" photographers its target audience includes working professionals too. A scholarship of $5,000 will be awarded to an established photographer to be used for a specific photographic project. The APA is a commercial photographers' organization, and the Lucie Foundation's mission is three tiered: to honor master photographers, discover and cultivate new talent and promote the appreciation of photography throughout the world. They're working together to benefit each of their constituencies, which in turn could benefit you. So if you've been looking for a way to fund a personal project you're passionate about, this may be the ideal opportunity. For more information and an application, visit the Lucie Foundation's web site. 

http://www.luciefoundation.org/education/scholarship-APA_2011_2012.php
DPMag
Photographers can now apply for a unique scholarship from the American Photographic Artists association and the Lucie Foundation. This award is a little different than most because it's more like a grant, and instead of being geared to young, "emerging" photographers its target audience includes working professionals too. A scholarship…

Life Imitating Art

Alexa Meade makes photographs of people that look like oil paintings. And here's the catch: she doesn't do it with post-production, or with a fancy filter, or in any other high-tech way. She simply paints her subjects and their surroundings to look like actual oil paintings. Then she photographs them. Simple. Brilliant. Beautiful. I love this kind of outside-the-box thinking and creative problem solving. Sometimes the simplest approch is also the most elegant and effective.

http://news.yahoo.com/photos/alexa-meade-photos-imitate-paintings-1319236464-slideshow
DPMag
Alexa Meade makes photographs of people that look like oil paintings. And here's the catch: she doesn't do it with post-production, or with a fancy filter, or in any other high-tech way. She simply paints her subjects and their surroundings to look like actual oil paintings. Then she photographs them.…

Talkin’ Baseball

Baseball season's been long over throughout much of the country, but in Texas and St. Louis it ended just this past weekend. In honor of my hometown St. Louis Cardinals winning the World Series, today I've got a great gallery from Life Magazine of some of baseball's most iconic images. This historic look back through baseball's best moments and players includes many of the greats from the black & white era: Willie Mays, Jackie Robinson, Mickey Mantle and of course, Cardinal great Stan "The Man" Musial. When you're finished perusing, stick around at Life.com and take a look at some of the other awesome galleries of baseball photographs.

http://www.life.com/gallery/40812/image/50399794/lifes-best-baseball-pictures
DPMag
Baseball season's been long over throughout much of the country, but in Texas and St. Louis it ended just this past weekend. In honor of my hometown St. Louis Cardinals winning the World Series, today I've got a great gallery from Life Magazine of some of baseball's most iconic images.…

Happy Halloween

Today's post is simply spooktacular. It's Halloween and I've got a couple of great places for you to go today for some haunted photo tips. The first one I know is an excellent piece because I wrote it myself. It's here at the Digital Photo web site in the Tip of the Week section. (Which, by the way, you should definitely sign up to have a new photo tip emailed to your inbox each week.) It's five tips that will help you make creepy lighting, or successful low-light images of glowing jack-o-lanterns, or awesome portraits of costumed kids. In a similar vein, the Digital Photography School blog just published its own take on Halloween tips. They aren't overly Halloween-centric, but they still offer useful insights for a variety of photographic situations. And the accompanying ghoulish images are really nice as well. Neither post, unfortunately, includes advice for acquiring more candy or avoiding having your house tee-peed by devilish kids. For that you're on your own.

http://www.dpmag.com/how-to/tip-of-the-week/five-halloween-photo-tips-10-24-11.html
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/halloween-photography-tips

DPMag
Today's post is simply spooktacular. It's Halloween and I've got a couple of great places for you to go today for some haunted photo tips. The first one I know is an excellent piece because I wrote it myself. It's here at the Digital Photo web site in the Tip…

Exploded Flowers

Sometimes I have to share something here just because it's so stunningly beautiful—even if I'm not sure I can provide an explicit photographic learning opportunity with the post. Such is the case today, when I direct you to seek out the Exploded Flowers project by "serious hobbyist" photographer Fong Qi Wei. Fong, who is based in Singapore, has really accomplished something quite simple and beautiful, and utterly unlike anything I've ever seen before. And it makes me gasp audibly every time I come back to it. Maybe the takeaway is this: sometimes great photography is not at all about technique or even execution, but simply a beautiful idea that produces a beautiful result.

http://www.featureshoot.com/2011/10/exploded-flowers-photographed-by-fong-qi-wei/

DPMag
Sometimes I have to share something here just because it's so stunningly beautiful—even if I'm not sure I can provide an explicit photographic learning opportunity with the post. Such is the case today, when I direct you to seek out the Exploded Flowers project by "serious hobbyist" photographer Fong Qi…

I Am The 13 Percent

When it comes to focusing your camera there are lots of ways to go about it. In the end, though, the choices really boil down to two options: autofocus or manual. I've always been a fan of manual focusing. I think it's because I learned this way in the pre-auto era, and I had some bad experiences missing shots because my early autofocusing cameras couldn't keep up with the action or because I was working in low light. As I get older I find that I rely on my eyes a little less and on the camera to autofocus a little more. These days I'd say I use manual focus most of the time, with a little bit of autofocus thrown in. And that, according to a recent poll at Digital Photography School, means that I'm in the 13% group. Turns out that most people, by far, use autofocus most of the time. In fact, three quarters of photographers rely on autofocus at least half of the time. That's a pretty significant group, I'd say. Check out the pie chart at DPS to see how the statistics break down, to figure out where you fall in comparison to other photographers, and to read some interesting and insightful comments from readers about how and why they choose to focus their cameras the way they do.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/how-photographers-focus-their-cameras-poll-results

DPMag
When it comes to focusing your camera there are lots of ways to go about it. In the end, though, the choices really boil down to two options: autofocus or manual. I've always been a fan of manual focusing. I think it's because I learned this way in the pre-auto…
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