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More on back-button focusing

Remember a few weeks ago when I mentioned my personal discovery of "back-button" focusing? Well here's a video about using the technique courtesy of Nikon Blog. With simple use of the AF On button, you can easily separate focus activation from the shutter release. This makes it especially easy to start and stop focus tracking to have a better shot at precisely capturing a fast-moving subject. That's why sports shooters seem to be so keen on the technique. But even if you're not a sports photographer, there's bound to be a back-button focusing approach that works for you. The video is especially useful for Nikon shooters, but the principles apply across other camera brands too. 

http://www.nikonblog.net/autofocus-af-on-lens
DPMag
Remember a few weeks ago when I mentioned my personal discovery of "back-button" focusing? Well here's a video about using the technique courtesy of Nikon Blog. With simple use of the AF On button, you can easily separate focus activation from the shutter release. This makes it especially easy to…

Photography and the law

This is a must read for every photographer—unless of course you never take pictures outside of your own home. It’s a post from Black Star rising, linked to via A Photo Editor, all about the complex legal issues surrounding photography. It helps us understand what we as photographers need to know about our rights. It’s an increasingly important issue both for photographers and for an actively engaged citizenry. You can get a lot of good insights from the comments on the APE post as well. Know your rights, understand the law, make great pictures.

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2010/09/09/photographers-and-the-law/
DPMag
This is a must read for every photographer—unless of course you never take pictures outside of your own home. It’s a post from Black Star rising, linked to via A Photo Editor, all about the complex legal issues surrounding photography. It helps us understand what we as photographers need to…

The most expensive roll of Tri-X ever

Last month The Online Photographer ran a great post about Phase One's black & white digital back. That's right: A medium format digital camera back that only records black & white images. If I know one thing about photographers, it's that there is not a huge clamor for a $40,000 digital camera back that only records black & white images. So why do I want to point it out? Because it offers a great look at the way digital cameras record light, and how they utilize a filter array to turn a black and white image (which is what all but the Foveon sensor captures) into a faux color image. That's also right: your digital camera's color is faked from a black & white original. One of the neat things about this digital back is the increased sharpness (or at least the claims of increased sharpness) because the light doesn't have to travel through a Bayer filter. That’s the thing that makes your digital camera capture in color. The whole idea is just a neat little footnote in the annals of photography because, for the most part, the buyers of this camera are scientific and military users. Though if you're a solely black & white shooter, why should the digital revolution leave you behind? This camera's perfect for you—assuming you've got 40-grand to dedicate to your next black & white camera.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2010/09/phaseones-bw-digital-back.html
DPMag
Last month The Online Photographer ran a great post about Phase One's black & white digital back. That's right: A medium format digital camera back that only records black & white images. If I know one thing about photographers, it's that there is not a huge clamor for a $40,000…

How to photograph your pregnant wife

Perfect timing! Well, perfect for me, anyway. My wife and I are expecting our first child, and so far we've been documenting the progress with a monthly profile portrait of her growing tummy. So this DPS post couldn't have arrived at a better time. I especially like the idea of making tummy portraits outside. I think those will show our future daughter how her mommy got out and about with baby in tow. It seems that outdoors shots might also help us make pretty pictures rather than, well, creepy belly shots. I've seen some of those before, and I don't think I want any part of that. I know my wife doesn’t. So if you're expecting, or if you might be called on to photograph an expectant mother, check out these tips for making better maternity portraits.
 
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/tummy-time-7-tips-for-taking-great-maternity-shots
DPMag
Perfect timing! Well, perfect for me, anyway. My wife and I are expecting our first child, and so far we've been documenting the progress with a monthly profile portrait of her growing tummy. So this DPS post couldn't have arrived at a better time. I especially like the idea of…

All about photo contests

A judge recently awarded the $160,000 grand prize in a major Australian photo contest to a friend of his. The friend also won the prize last year too. This may not be fishy at all, but it sure raised some eyebrows. After all, the appearance of impropriety is as dangerous as actual impropriety. It’s an interesting read at The Online Photographer that also serves as a cautionary reminder: not all contests are worth entering. Keep in mind that some folks use photo contests as ploys for income derived solely from registration fees. Others simply use contests to gather a pool of images to be used for a commercial purpose, with pitiful prize money reflecting a fraction of the actual commercial value of the images. The point is: keep your eyes peeled to avoid being taken advantage of. The TOP piece also contains links to other great photo contest info, as well as resources for finding the good ones.

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2010/10/judge-defends-choice-.html
DPMag
A judge recently awarded the $160,000 grand prize in a major Australian photo contest to a friend of his. The friend also won the prize last year too. This may not be fishy at all, but it sure raised some eyebrows. After all, the appearance of impropriety is as dangerous…

Ansel Adams, Street Photographer

We all know Ansel Adams as the granddaddy of all iconic western landscape photographers, but did you know he was a bit of a street photographer too? In the World War II era, Adams made pictures for many commercial clients. Like so many artists, commercial assignments taken outside of their own area of expertise helped fund the iconic imagery the artists would ultimately become known for. This series of Los Angeles images was made for a 1939 Fortune magazine article about the aviation industry in L.A. It’s an interesting glimpse into a whole different set of photographic talents Mr. Adams possessed. And it helps remind those of us who are struggling to balance art and commerce that even legends need to pay the bills.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2010/10/26/130838664/adamsla
DPMag
We all know Ansel Adams as the granddaddy of all iconic western landscape photographers, but did you know he was a bit of a street photographer too? In the World War II era, Adams made pictures for many commercial clients. Like so many artists, commercial assignments taken outside of their…
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