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Laszlo Willinger

A friend walked into my office the other day with a big beautiful black and white print of leading lady Vivien Leigh, best known as Scarlet in the movie Gone With The Wind. He'd purchased it for $20 at an antique shop just a few minutes before. The print was poster sized, although it looked old it didn't look like a traditional darkroom silver gelatin print. Most intriguing, it was signed and numbered. The signature was almost impossible to read, but after a bit of Googling we found out who created this gorgeous image: Laszlo Willinger, a Hollywood photographer of epic skill. Most of us are familiar with the work of Clarence Sinclair Bull and George Hurrell, but that's generally where the household names end when it comes to photographers who captured all the stars during Hollywood's golden era. Turns out Mr. Willinger belongs in their company too. He was a master portraitist with a fascinating personal story. Read all about him and see a large sampling of his work at the Iconista blog, then see what else you can dig up about the man and his prolific body of work online.

http://theiconista.blogspot.com/2008/08/laszlo-willinger.html
A friend walked into my office the other day with a big beautiful black and white print of leading lady Vivien Leigh, best known as Scarlet in the movie Gone With The Wind. He'd purchased it for $20 at an antique shop just a few minutes before. The print was…

The Man Who Shot The Sixties

Ending our video-centric week of learning from great photographers, here's a neat film about photographer Brian Duffy. Duffy was an iconic London fashion photographer from the 1960s. At the time, he was a downright superstar. Then one day he decided to up and quit, going so far as to burn all of his negatives. And now after a 30 year hiatus, he's taken another picture. Prompted by his son Chris, he picked up a camera once again. Chris made this documentary about his father and his work, and you can watch the whole thing online at Vimeo. Not only is it interesting and informative, like all good documentaries it's very entertaining, too.

http://vimeo.com/9141202
Ending our video-centric week of learning from great photographers, here's a neat film about photographer Brian Duffy. Duffy was an iconic London fashion photographer from the 1960s. At the time, he was a downright superstar. Then one day he decided to up and quit, going so far as to burn…

Dan Winters In His Own Words

One of my favorite photo blogs is called A Photo Editor. This recent three-part interview with one of my favorite photographers working today, Dan Winters, illustrates precisely why. It also showcases Winters phenomenal creative talent. Sure he's the cream of the crop of portrait photographers, but he's also a talented illustrator, sculptor and wielder of scanning electron microscopes. Read all about how Dan became as talented as he is—as well as the many tools and techniques he uses to express himself—in this wonderful interview conducted by Rob Haggart.

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2011/04/13/dan-winters-interview-part-1/
One of my favorite photo blogs is called A Photo Editor. This recent three-part interview with one of my favorite photographers working today, Dan Winters, illustrates precisely why. It also showcases Winters phenomenal creative talent. Sure he's the cream of the crop of portrait photographers, but he's also a talented…

Learning From The Best

Continuing with my theme of improving your photography by learning from the best of the best, the masters of the medium, the most iconic photographers of recent years...allow me to direct you to a wonderful web site called the Shooting Gallery. It's a collection of videos highlighting world class photographers who have agreed to discuss how, and why, they make their work. From Ryan McGinley to Alec Soth, Cindy Sherman to Hiroshi Sugimoto, these photographers are world class artists and creators and it's downright fascinating to see them dissect and discuss how they work.

http://shootinggallery.tumblr.com
Continuing with my theme of improving your photography by learning from the best of the best, the masters of the medium, the most iconic photographers of recent years...allow me to direct you to a wonderful web site called the Shooting Gallery. It's a collection of videos highlighting world class photographers…

Arnold Newman

Yesterday I mentioned the presentation I attended by Gregory Heisler. Part of what made it so great was that the photographer also went into great depth to tell us about his experience working for one of the greatest portraitists of the 20th century, Arnold Newman. Mr. Heisler clearly has the utmost respect for Mr. Newman, and as he showed us a few dozen of Mr. Newman’s most renowned photographs it became clear the influence Mr. Newman had on Mr. Heisler’s own work. And that reminded me of the influence Mr. Newman should have on everyone’s photographs. To that end, please let me direct you to a great and inspiring resource about Mr. Newman. It’s the Arnold Newman Archive, a collaboration of his heirs and his gallery, dedicated to carrying on the legacy of this great photographer. It’s perhaps the best online resource for information about the man and his work, and a little time spent studying the gallery is probably equivalent to a full year at a great photo school.

http://www.arnoldnewmanarchive.com
Yesterday I mentioned the presentation I attended by Gregory Heisler. Part of what made it so great was that the photographer also went into great depth to tell us about his experience working for one of the greatest portraitists of the 20th century, Arnold Newman. Mr. Heisler clearly has the…

Gregory Heisler

I recently attended a lecture by Gregory Heisler. What a great speaker, what an enjoyable evening, and what a ridiculously talented photographer. He showed a video of himself in action and he explained the creation of dozens of his images—including iconic Time and Life magazine covers you’re doubtlessly familiar with. A friend and I were struck by how much the video of Mr. Heisler working in studio reminded each of us of our own studios, and the general energy and approach we take to every photo shoot. What was different, of course, was the end result—proving to me, anyway, that it isn’t about the gear or the technique so much as it’s about the creativity. And it probably doesn’t hurt if you’re a true photographic genius, as Mr. Heisler seems to be. So I recommend that you rush out to his web site right away to view a variety of his portrait galleries. Then head over to YouTube to watch him diagram the lighting he used on a few famous shots, courtesy of his lighting sponsor, Profoto. Then think about all of Mr. Heisler’s great advice and wonderful photographs, and go out and put that information to use in your own work.

www.gregoryheisler.com

http://www.youtube.com/user/profotovids#p/u/16/x63bvpNUxLE
I recently attended a lecture by Gregory Heisler. What a great speaker, what an enjoyable evening, and what a ridiculously talented photographer. He showed a video of himself in action and he explained the creation of dozens of his images—including iconic Time and Life magazine covers you're doubtlessly familiar with.…
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