How To Properly Get Permission To Shoot On Location

I don't like asking for permission. I generally want to do what I want when I want and how I want. This gets me into a fair amount of trouble. It would really get me into trouble if I applied this same philosophy to photographing in public, but I'm smart enough to know that photo shoots tend to attract attention, and if you don't have permission to shoot in public you're probably going to get hassled. Even worse, you might be sent packing. That's bad on any shoot, but especially so if you're a professional working with a budget and client. Cancelled shoots cost money, and so it's important to get permission—and the necessary permits—for your location photo and video shoots. You might think that a park is public property, but in fact if you're setting up a commercial venture, or even a private photo shoot that simply prevents others from enjoying the park, you're darn right you need permission. Thankfully this post by photographer Chase Jarvis explains how and why to go about getting the necessary permits for your public photo shoots, and he even includes examples of actual paperwork and documents from his own client-driven assignments. The bottom line is this: if you're shooting for money, you're practically always going to need permission. And even if you're shooting just for fun, you sometimes need permission too. Check out the blog to find out how to get it.

http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/03/how-to-permit-photo-video-shoots/
DPMag
I don't like asking for permission. I generally want to do what I want when I want and how I want. This gets me into a fair amount of trouble. It would really get me into trouble if I applied this same philosophy to photographing in public, but I'm smart…

The Ramble In Central Park

I'm not a New Yorker, but after seeing this book I kinda wish I was. It's called The Ramble In Central Park, and it's a collection of Robert A. McCabe’s photographs of this "Wilderness west of Fifth.” A New Yorker may know about this wilderness, but the rest of us may not be familiar with The Ramble; It truly is a little bit of raw nature right there in the middle of the city. Not just green space like the rest of Central park, it’s actual wild space—a densely forested area almost 40 acres in size and filled with winding paths, streams, lake, boulders and trees. This Ramble is a lovely spot, and these photographs make me wish I had the opportunity to experience the urban wilderness on any afternoon stroll. A beautiful spot in any location, this particular place—and this collection of photographs—is made even more special because of its juxtaposition with New York City. Visit Mr. McCabe's web site to see more photographs of this wonderful place, and buy the book to serve as a subtle reminder that you shouldn't let simple geography keep you from photographing what you want. If he can photograph nature in the heart of Manhattan, anything must be possible.

http://www.mccabephotos.com/Ramble.htm
DPMag
I'm not a New Yorker, but after seeing this book I kinda wish I was. It's called The Ramble In Central Park, and it's a collection of Robert A. McCabe’s photographs of this "Wilderness west of Fifth.” A New Yorker may know about this wilderness, but the rest of us…

Free Guide To Selling Prints Online

Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn't your photo editing occur online too? I can't say that I've ever done any serious I just downloaded a free and quite interesting guide to selling prints online courtesy of the fine folks at Photoshelter. Sure, they have an agenda, and that agenda is to convince you that their service is an ideal place to store, display, license, print, and sell your photographs, but that doesn't mean the info they provide in exchange for an email address is any less pertinent or accurate. It's a great guide to selling prints online, whether you work with Photoshelter or not. Covering everything from color matching to print finishing, trends in what sells and even pricing and marketing strategies, any photographer who's ever even thought of selling a print via their web site would be well served to click over to Photoshelter and download this guide. Then go ahead and get rich selling your photographs online, and tell me all about the success that this post inspired.

http://www.photoshelter.com/mkt/how-to-sell-prints
DPMag
Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn't your photo editing occur online too? I can't say that I've ever done any serious I just downloaded a free and quite interesting guide to selling prints online courtesy of the fine folks at Photoshelter. Sure, they have an agenda, and…

Online Photo Editing Resources

Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn't your photo editing occur online too? I can't say that I've ever done any serious image editing online, but the idea definitely intrigues me—especially as a resource for folks who don't have hundreds of dollars to shell out for photo editing programs that live on their computers. The Light Stalking photo blog recently compiled a list of five free online photo editing programs that deserve a look if you're interested in editing your images online. One of them even carries the Photoshop name. All in all, online editors probably aren't yet ready to take over for full-fledged computer-based versions of photo software, but they're making great strides—and they're providing a useful resource for many users, and maybe even a glimpse into the future of photo software.

http://www.lightstalking.com/online-photo-editing
DPMag
Everything else happens on the internet, so why shouldn't your photo editing occur online too? I can't say that I've ever done any serious image editing online, but the idea definitely intrigues me—especially as a resource for folks who don't have hundreds of dollars to shell out for photo editing…

The next big thing in really small cameras

In case you missed it, your pocket point-and-shoot is no longer the smallest camera around. Neither is your cell phone. It's not your toy spy camera either. It's a camera the size of a grain of salt, and it was announced earlier this month by researchers in Germany. At 1x1 millimeters in size, it's probably not going to be for sale at your favorite camera store any time soon, but you may find yourself on the other end of this camera via your doctor's office. The device is destined to be immensely helpful in the medical world of endoscopic surgery, but it could also find its way into many other devices as well. And who knows, perhaps the technology could help get a future D-SLR to fit into a teacup?

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2381752,00.asp
DPMag
In case you missed it, your pocket point-and-shoot is no longer the smallest camera around. Neither is your cell phone. It's not your toy spy camera either. It's a camera the size of a grain of salt, and it was announced earlier this month by researchers in Germany. At 1x1…

The ground-level tripod

Every time I have to get my camera close to the ground I'm never really sure of the best way to go about it. I could use a tripod with a convertible center column that can suspend the camera quite low, or even upside down. Or I could use a backpack or sandbag and squeeze the camera gently into place just a few inches from the floor. Or I could finally wise up and do what James Burger did and make my own extremely low angle floor plate tripod. What a simple idea; I'm embarrassed it hasn't occurred to me sooner. After all, a real tripod head attaches to the legs with a simple 3/8" screw, so why not use your own 3/8" bolt and put it through a board to mount a tripod head at floor level? With a few bucks and a little ingenuity, Mr. Burger is really on to something here. And now I know how to get those floor level shots without resorting to an unsteady approach. 

http://www.diyphotography.net/take-extremely-low-angle-pictures-with-a-floor-plate-tripod
DPMag
Every time I have to get my camera close to the ground I'm never really sure of the best way to go about it. I could use a tripod with a convertible center column that can suspend the camera quite low, or even upside down. Or I could use a…
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