A Few Great Tripod Accessories

I love my tripod, and I feel like it's fairly tricked out: it's got legs and a geared head I love… and that's about it. I never give much thought to tripod accessories, or I never did until I read this great post by Photo Naturalist Steve Berardi. He suggests three simple—and yes, amazing—accessories for tripods. The first one is an L-shaped bracket that keeps your camera centered over the legs even when positioned in the vertical axis. He had me with this one; I hate the way my camera dangles there over the side of my tripod whenever I go vertical. Not only do I hate it, it tends to mess me up when I've worked to center myself precisely for a composition. I won't give away the other two accessories, so you'll have to go read about them for yourself. Trust me when I say that your tripod CAN be tricked out, and it's probably a great way to improve your tripod efficiency too.

http://photonaturalist.net/3-great-tripod-accessories
DPMag
I love my tripod, and I feel like it's fairly tricked out: it's got legs and a geared head I love… and that's about it. I never give much thought to tripod accessories, or I never did until I read this great post by Photo Naturalist Steve Berardi. He suggests…

A Kickstarter Success Story

I love the idea behind the web site Kickstarter, especially as it relates to creatives. You get an idea, you need to raise funds to make that idea a reality, you start a Kickstarter project and folks all over the world can contribute to projects they believe in—or the ones that offer the best schwag in exchange for a monetary pledge. While I've seen interesting Kickstarter projects for photo books, travel magazines, gallery prints and even independent films, none of them have seen the success of this project by an inventor of an interesting piece of camera gear. It's the Capture Camera Clip system, which is designed to let you securely hold your camera on your belt, without worrying about camera straps and too much fuss. The device sure sparked the interest of lots of other photographers, because as of this writing almost 5,200 of them have contributed a whopping $370,000—a significant success when you consider that the inventor, Peter Dering, was looking to raise just $10,000 in order to complete an initial production run of the product. Check out his Kickstarter page, consider contributing, and look for this neat device as soon as it's released.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/97103764/capture-camera-clip-system
DPMag
I love the idea behind the web site Kickstarter, especially as it relates to creatives. You get an idea, you need to raise funds to make that idea a reality, you start a Kickstarter project and folks all over the world can contribute to projects they believe in—or the ones…

Mount Your D-SLR Lenses To Your iPhone. Really.

Ever since the iPhone, and in particular the introduction of its Instagram app, folks everywhere have been treating their iPhones like actual cameras. The point, usually, is that you can make great pictures with even a relatively rudimentary fixed-focal length lens. And it also proves, as Chase Jarvis will attest, that the best camera is the one you have with you all the time. Just like an iPhone. Well now there's another add-on for folks who want to get serious, really serious, about taking iPhone pictures... in a totally ridiculous way. It's the SLR iPhone lens mount from PhotoJojo, which allows you to take the zoom off your Nikon D90 (or whatever Nikon or Canon D-SLR you happen to be toting) and affix it to your iPhone for "serious" picture taking power. I know it's too ridiculous to be true, and yet here it is. See for yourself at the PhotoJojo web site.

http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/iphone-slr-mount
DPMag
Ever since the iPhone, and in particular the introduction of its Instagram app, folks everywhere have been treating their iPhones like actual cameras. The point, usually, is that you can make great pictures with even a relatively rudimentary fixed-focal length lens. And it also proves, as Chase Jarvis will attest,…

Photoshop Exchange

Thanks again, John Paul Caponigro, for coming through with spot-on invaluable Photoshop information. In this recent post he points us readers to a great resource for over 10,000 Photoshop add-ons—from templates to tutorials, brushes to plug-ins. It's Adobe's own Photoshop Exchange, where photographers can access thousands of unique tools (like Actions, Styles and Brushes) to make Photoshop better—or easier, more fun and more interesting. And many of them are given away for free. The ones that do charge, Caponigro points out, average only a few bucks each, so either way it's an invaluable resource. Take a look at what you can add on to your computer to make Photoshop work even better.

http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/blog/6033/photoshop-exchange/
DPMag
Thanks again, John Paul Caponigro, for coming through with spot-on invaluable Photoshop information. In this recent post he points us readers to a great resource for over 10,000 Photoshop add-ons—from templates to tutorials, brushes to plug-ins. It's Adobe's own Photoshop Exchange, where photographers can access thousands of unique tools (like…

Cameras In Action

I recently saw this neat little video on the DPS blog. It's by street photographer Eric Kim, who strapped a tiny GoPro video camera to his Leica's hot shoe and took to the streets. A neat way to see how an actual street photographer works. I'm not at all disparaging Mr. Kim's approach to photographing people on the street, but it did make me realize how differently he approaches his subjects than some other photographers I've seen from their cameras' perspectives—like, for instance, James Nachtwey, who in the documentary "War Photographer" had a tiny video camera strapped to his camera as well. It too is a fascinating look at how a photographer works, made even more powerful when viewed from the perspective of his camera. It's interesting that Mr. Kim tries to avoid eye contact and shoots quickly before moving on to another subject, while Mr. Nachtwey works in a more lingering, deliberate manner. Part of it may be the different subject matter, part of it is surely different shooting styles. Whatever the differences, and whichever approach you prefer, it's extremely interesting to watch photographers work like this. Check out both videos via the links below. 

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/watch-how-a-street-photographer-going-about-a-shoot-video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3VoyjUP8hg
DPMag
I recently saw this neat little video on the DPS blog. It's by street photographer Eric Kim, who strapped a tiny GoPro video camera to his Leica's hot shoe and took to the streets. A neat way to see how an actual street photographer works. I'm not at all disparaging…

Restoring An Antique Tintype

It's amazing what a skilled set of hands can do with a tool as powerful as Photoshop. Take, for instance, the world of photographic restoration. It's a different set of skills than just the regular old image editing and retouching so many of us do in our regular photographic workflows. When it comes to restoring an old image, I can't think of any challenge more daunting than a 19th century tintype. Here's a link to a collection of these photographs, which were made right on a sheet of metal. Check out the amazing transformation that takes place in this restoration project, and keep it in mind the next time you feel like a retouching project is too daunting.

http://topdogimaging.net/blog/restoring-a-photograph-from-the-1870s
DPMag
It's amazing what a skilled set of hands can do with a tool as powerful as Photoshop. Take, for instance, the world of photographic restoration. It's a different set of skills than just the regular old image editing and retouching so many of us do in our regular photographic workflows.…
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