Monday, January 9, 2012

To D4 Or Not To D4. Is It Even A Question?

The Nikon D4 was announced last week to much fanfare. I have to admit, the flagship D-SLR in the Nikon pro lineup seriously pulled on my irrational "I need to buy this camera" heart-strings. Maybe it's nostalgia for my most beloved camera ever, the perfect tank of film SLR, the F4. Maybe it's that on paper the D4 doesn't reinvent the wheel—which makes me think that the company has created a really good camera that delivers really good pictures. It appears that Nikon has focused on improving usability and picture quality, rather than simply filling the thing with specs that make it look great on paper. But that's really neither here nor there, because there's plenty to read on this site and elsewhere about the new D4. What prompted me to write today was reading The Strobist's take on it. A Nikon guy himself, David Hobby says he won't be buying this great new camera, which is surprising in and of itself. More surprising is that it's because he recently unloaded his arsenal of Nikon equipment and made the switch—not to a Canon D-SLR, but to a medium format digital system. Given the trend of 35mm-film-format D-SLRs getting better by leaps and bounds on an almost yearly basis and rivaling medium format, it's quite a surprising take—made even more surprising since The Strobist is all about using hand-held strobes to take D-SLR photography to the next level. It's a fascinating read, whether or not you agree with David's rationale. But it's one that certainly made me think, and made me extremely envious that I don't have $6,000 or $10,000 to consider investing in new camera equipment at the moment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/01/bailing-on-nikon-d4.html
DPMag Published in Blog
To D4 Or Not To D4. Is It Even A Question?


The Nikon D4 was announced last week to much fanfare. I have to admit, the flagship D-SLR in the Nikon pro lineup seriously pulled on my irrational "I need to buy this camera" heart-strings. Maybe it's nostalgia for my most beloved camera ever, the perfect tank of film SLR, the F4. Maybe it's that on paper the D4 doesn't reinvent the wheel—which makes me think that the company has created a really good camera that delivers really good pictures. It appears that Nikon has focused on improving usability and picture quality, rather than simply filling the thing with specs that make it look great on paper. But that's really neither here nor there, because there's plenty to read on this site and elsewhere about the new D4. What prompted me to write today was reading The Strobist's take on it. A Nikon guy himself, David Hobby says he won't be buying this great new camera, which is surprising in and of itself. More surprising is that it's because he recently unloaded his arsenal of Nikon equipment and made the switch—not to a Canon D-SLR, but to a medium format digital system. Given the trend of 35mm-film-format D-SLRs getting better by leaps and bounds on an almost yearly basis and rivaling medium format, it's quite a surprising take—made even more surprising since The Strobist is all about using hand-held strobes to take D-SLR photography to the next level. It's a fascinating read, whether or not you agree with David's rationale. But it's one that certainly made me think, and made me extremely envious that I don't have $6,000 or $10,000 to consider investing in new camera equipment at the moment.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/01/bailing-on-nikon-d4.html
Login to post comments

Popular How-To

Popular Gear

Subscribe & Save!
International residents, click here.