Sunday, January 30, 2011

Photography Is Legal Again

It just got more legal to photograph in public spaces around important government buildings and landmarks. Thanks to efforts from the New York Civil Liberties Union, the U.S. government last week made it once again officially A-okay to photograph any and all exteriors of federal buildings viewed from public spaces. The Hyperallergic blog has a link to the documents, and Chase Jarvis suggests printing them out to help inform any government officials who haven't yet been brought up to speed. Chase also offers a great example of how problematic the old way was; he wasn't photographing a federal building, but because his streetscape shoot was close to a federal building he was still shut down by armed officers. And if you want to read about governments that really don’t like photography, check out the Time interview with photographer Platon who describes evading Burmese secret police in order to make a simple portrait.

http://hyperallergic.com/17621/us-photogs-official-free-to-photograph-public-space-federal-buildings/
http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/01/avoid-being-hassled-by-the-cops-while-shooting-pictures/
http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,731023907001_2040082,00.html
DPMag Published in Blog
Photography Is Legal Again


It just got more legal to photograph in public spaces around important government buildings and landmarks. Thanks to efforts from the New York Civil Liberties Union, the U.S. government last week made it once again officially A-okay to photograph any and all exteriors of federal buildings viewed from public spaces. The Hyperallergic blog has a link to the documents, and Chase Jarvis suggests printing them out to help inform any government officials who haven't yet been brought up to speed. Chase also offers a great example of how problematic the old way was; he wasn't photographing a federal building, but because his streetscape shoot was close to a federal building he was still shut down by armed officers. And if you want to read about governments that really don’t like photography, check out the Time interview with photographer Platon who describes evading Burmese secret police in order to make a simple portrait.

http://hyperallergic.com/17621/us-photogs-official-free-to-photograph-public-space-federal-buildings/
http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2011/01/avoid-being-hassled-by-the-cops-while-shooting-pictures/
http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,731023907001_2040082,00.html
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