Sunday, February 13, 2011

More Ways To Modify Handheld Strobes

I have to admit, sometimes the great ideas that come from the Strobist web site make me a little embarrassed. The problem is, they can be so simple and so brilliant that they make you wonder: "Why didn't I think of that?" Here's such a case, in the form of a "hack" to use studio strobe honeycomb grids—which focus light to narrowly send it in only one direction rather than scattered all around the room—with small hot-shoe portable flashes. The trick? Use a rubber band or a small elastic cord to connect the big ol' grid to that little bitty flash. The principle works just the same, even if the flash isn't using the entire surface of the grid. All you want is to make sure light is only traveling in a single direction. It's a great fix, either way, and definitely worth a look. Find it over at strobist.com.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2011/01/hack-your-grid-ii.html
DPMag Published in Blog
More Ways To Modify Handheld Strobes


I have to admit, sometimes the great ideas that come from the Strobist web site make me a little embarrassed. The problem is, they can be so simple and so brilliant that they make you wonder: "Why didn't I think of that?" Here's such a case, in the form of a "hack" to use studio strobe honeycomb grids—which focus light to narrowly send it in only one direction rather than scattered all around the room—with small hot-shoe portable flashes. The trick? Use a rubber band or a small elastic cord to connect the big ol' grid to that little bitty flash. The principle works just the same, even if the flash isn't using the entire surface of the grid. All you want is to make sure light is only traveling in a single direction. It's a great fix, either way, and definitely worth a look. Find it over at strobist.com.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2011/01/hack-your-grid-ii.html
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